National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 6 Closing Remarks
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21747.
×

References

CSO (Central Statistical Office), MOH (Ministry of Health), TDRC (Tropical Diseases Research Centre), University of Zambia, and Macro International Inc. 2009. Zambia Demographic and Health Survey 2007. Calverton, MD: CSO and Macro International Inc.

Edelman Health Barometer. 2011. Edelman. http://www.slideshare.net/EdelmanInsights/edelman-health-barometer-2011-global-deck (accessed July 29, 2014).

Edmans, A. 2007. Does the stock market fully value intangibles?: Employee satisfaction and equity prices. Journal of Financial Economics 101(3):621-640.

Henke, R. M., R. Z. Goetzel, J. McHugh, and F. Isaac. 2011. Recent experience in health promotion at Johnson & Johnson: Lower health spending, strong return on investment. Health Affairs 30(3):490-499.

Hussmanns, R. 1996. ILO’s recommendations on methodologies concerning informal sector data collection. Unveiling the informal sector: More than counting heads, edited by B. Herman and W. Stoffers. Aldershot, UK: Avebury.

Hymel, P. A., R. R. Loeppke, C. M. Baase, W. N. Burton, N. P. Hartenbaum, T. W. Hudson, R. K. McLellan, K. L. Mueller, M. A. Roberts, C. M. Yarborough, D. L. Konicki, and P. W. Larson. 2011. Workplace health protection and promotion: A new pathway for a healthier—and safer—workforce. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine 53(6):695-702.

IHME (Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation). 2010. 2010 global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors study. Seattle: University of Washington.

ILO (International Labour Organization). 2013. Key indicators of the labour market, 8th edition. Geneva: ILO.

ILO and WIEGO (Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing). 2013. Women and men in the informal economy: A statistical picture-second edition. Geneva: ILO.

Khai, T. T., T. Kawakami, and K. Kogi. 2011. Participatory action-oriented training. ILO DWT for East and South-East Asia and the Pacific. Hanoi, Vietnam: ILO.

McKinsey Global Institute. 2014. From poverty to empowerment: India’s imperative for jobs, growth, and effective basic services. San Francisco: McKinsey & Company.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21747.
×

Mills, A. 2014. Health care systems in low- and middle-income countries. New England Journal of Medicine 370(6):552-557.

Planning Commission of India. 2011. High level expert group report on universal health coverage in India. New Delhi: Planning Commission of India.

Shepherd-Smith, A. 2012. Free drugs for India’s poor. Lancet 380(9845):874.

SNA (System of National Accounts). 1993. System of National Accounts 1993. Commission of European Communities. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

Takala, J. 2002. Introductory report: Decent work—Safe work. Paper presented at the 16th World Congress on Safety and Health. Geneva: ILO.

Tangcharoensathien, V., S. Limwattananon, W. Patcharanarumol, and J. Thammatacharee. 2014. Monitoring and Evaluating Progress towards Universal Health Coverage in Thailand. PLoS Medicine 11:9.

UNDP (United Nations Development Programme). 2013. Millennium Development Goals: Progress report, Zambia, 2013. Zambia: UNDP.

Wang, H., K. Switlick, C. Ortiz, B. Zurita, and C. Connor. 2012. Health insurance handbook: How to make it work. World Bank Working Paper no. 219. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

WEF (World Economic Forum). 2008. The wellness imperative: Creating more effective organizations. Geneva: World Economic Forum.

WHO (World Health Organization). 2007. Everybody’s business: Strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes, WHO’s framework for action. Geneva: World Health Organization.

WHO. 2013. WHO global plan of action on workers’ health (2008–2017): Baseline for implementation. Geneva: World Health Organization.

WHO. 2014a. Media centre: Protecting workers’ health. Fact sheet No. 389. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs389/en (accessed October 15, 2015).

WHO. 2014b. What is universal health coverage? http://www.who.int/features/qa/universal_health_coverage/en (accessed April 20, 2015).

WHO. 2015a. Health financing for universal coverage: What is universal coverage? http://www.who.int/health_financing/universal_coverage_definition/en (accessed March 13, 2015).

WHO. 2015b. Health financing for universal coverage: Universal coverage- three dimensions. http://www.who.int/health_financing/strategy/dimensions/en (accessed August 8, 2015).

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21747.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21747.
×
Page 98
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $44.00 Buy Ebook | $35.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Universal health coverage (UHC) has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a key element in reducing social inequality and a critical component of sustainable development and poverty reduction. In most of the world UHC is sought through a combination of public and private-sector health care systems. In most low- and middle-income countries health systems are evolving to increasingly rely on the private sector because the public sector lacks the infrastructure and staff to meet all health care needs. With growing individual assets available for private-sector expenditure, patients often seek better access to technology, staff, and medicines. However, in low-income countries nearly 50 percent of health care financing is out-of-pocket. With the expected increase in the overall fraction of care provided through the private sector, these expenditures can be financially catastrophic for individuals in the informal workforce.

In the global workforce of approximately 3 billion people, only 10 to 15 percent are estimated to have some type of access to occupational health services. The informal workforce is growing worldwide, and the degree to which its occupational health needs are satisfied depends on the capabilities of the general health care system. In July 2014, the Institute of Medicine held a workshop on approaches to universal health coverage and occupational health and safety for informal sector workers in developing countries. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop. Approaches to Universal Health Coverage and Occupational Health and Safety for the Informal Workforce in Developing Countries identifies best practices and lessons learned for the informal workforce in developing countries in the financing of health care with respect to health care delivery models that are especially suitable to meeting a population's needs for a variety of occupational health issues, including the prevention of or mitigation of hazardous risks and the costs of providing medical and rehabilitation services and other benefits to various types of workers within this population. These experiences and lessons learned may be useful for stakeholders in moving the discussions, policies, and mechanisms forward to increase equitable access to quality health services without financial hardship for the informal workforce.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!