National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 4 Forensic Science Research at NIJ: A Blueprint for the Future
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

References

Bureau of Justice Statistics. (2012). Census of Publicly Funded Forensic Crime Laboratories, 2009. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

Campbell, S. (2010). Deliberative Priority Setting—A CIHR KT Module. Available: http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/documents/deliberative_priority_setting_module_e.pdf [June 2015].

Durlak, J., and DuPre, E. (2008). Implementation matters: A review of research on the influence of implementation on program outcomes and the factors affecting implementation. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41, 327-350.

Ernst, T., Berman, T., Buscaglia, J., Eckert-Lumsdon, T., Hanlon, C., Olsson, K., Palenik, C., Ryland, S., Trejos, T., Valadez, M., and Almirall, J.R. (2012). Signal-to-noise ratios in forensic glass analysis by micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. X-Ray Spectrometry, 43(1), 13-21.

Executive Office of the President. (2014a, February). Strengthening Forensic Science: A Progress Report. Executive Office of the President of the United States. Available: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/forensicscience_progressreport_feb-2014.pdf [June 18, 2015].

Executive Office of the President. (2014b, May). Strengthening the Forensic Sciences. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Science, Subcommittee on Forensic Science. Available: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/NSTC/forensic_science___may_2014.pdf [May 2015].

Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Latent Print Analysis. (2012). Latent Print Examination and Human Factors: Improving the Practice Through a Systems Approach. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Gabel, J.D. (2014). Realizing reliability in forensic science from the ground up. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 104(2), 283-352.

Gold, M., and Taylor, E. (2007). Moving research into practice: Lessons from the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s IDSRN program. Implementation Science, 2(9).

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

Guthrie, S., Wamae, W., Diepeveen, S., Wooding, S., and Grant, J. (2013). Measuring Research: A Guide to Research Evaluation Frameworks and Tools. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation. Available: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/MG1200/MG1217/RAND_MG1217.pdf [August 2015].

James Bell Associates. (2013). Lessons Learned Through the Application of Implementation Science Concepts to Children’s Bureau Discretionary Grant Programs. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates. Available: http://www.jbassoc.com/ReportsPublications/CB_ImpScienceReport_Final_012413.pdf [August 2015].

Kilbourne, A., Neumann, M., Pincus, H., Bauer, M., and Stall, R. (2007). Implementing evidence-based interventions in health care: Application of the replicating effective programs framework. Implementation Science, 2(42), doi:10.1186/1748-5908-2-42.

Lane, J., and Bertuzzi, S. (2011). Measuring the results of science investments. Science, 331, 678-680.

Laub, J.H. (2011). Strengthening NIJ: Mission, science, and process. NIJ Journal, October(268), 16-21. Available: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/235891.pdf [September 2015].

Lenaway, D., Halverson, P., Sotnikov, S., Tilson, H., Corso, L., and Millington, W. (2006). Public health systems research: Setting a national agenda. American Journal of Public Health, 96(3), 410-413.

Lovrich, N.P., Pratt, T.C., Gaffney, M.J., Johnson, C.L., Asplen, C.H., Hurst, L.H., and Schellberg, T.M. (2004). National Forensic DNA Study Report, Final Report. Pullman: Washington State University.

Martin, B., and Tang, P. (2006). The Benefits from Publicly Funded Research. Brighton, UK: University of Sussex, Science and Technology Policy Research. Available: https://www.sussex.ac.uk/webteam/gateway/file.php?name=sewp161.pdf&site=25 [August 2015].

National Institute of Justice. (2009). Fundamental Research to Improve Understanding of the Accuracy, Reliability, and Measurement Validity of Forensic Science Disciplines. Solicitation SL# 000878. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2010). Fundamental Research to Improve Understanding of the Accuracy, Reliability, and Measurement Validity of Forensic Science Disciplines. Solicitation SL# 000909. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2011a). The National Institute of Justice Response to the Report of the National Research Council: Strengthening the National Institute of Justice. Special Report. Washington, DC: Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2011b). Electronic Crime and Digital Evidence Recovery. Solicitation No. NIJ-2011-2798. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. Available: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000957.pdf [June 2015].

National Institute of Justice. (2011c). Basic Scientific Research to Support Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes. Solicitation No. NIJ-2011-2806. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2011d). Applied Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes. Solicitation No. NIJ-2011-2807. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2013). National Institute of Justice Annual Report 2013. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. Available: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/248568.pdf [June 18, 2015].

National Institute of Justice. (2014a). NIJ R&D Portfolio Management and Technology Transition Support. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

National Institute of Justice. (2014b). Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes. Solicitation No. NIJ-2014-3744. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice. (2015a). The Impact of Forensic Science Research and Development. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. Available: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/248572.pdf [April 2015].

National Institute of Justice. (2015b). Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes. Solicitation No. NIJ-2015-3985. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

National Institute of Justice Forensic Technology Center of Excellence. (2015). National Institute of Justice—The Forensic Technology Center of Excellence: Activities and Deliverables 2011 (Q4) Through 2015 (Q1). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice.

National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2015a). New NIST Center of Excellence to improve statistical analysis of forensic evidence. NIST Tech Beat. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce. Available: http://nist.gov/forensics/center-excellence-forensic052615.cfm [June 2015].

National Institute of Standards and Technology. (2015b). Organization of Scientific Area Committee Organization Chart. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce. Available: http://www.nist.gov/forensics/osac/upload/OSAC-Block-Org-Chart-3-17-2015-2.pdf [June 2015].

National Research Council. (2004). Forensic Analysis Weighing Bullet Lead Evidence. Committee on Scientific Assessment of Bullet Lead Elemental Composition Comparison. Board on Chemical Science and Technology, Division on Earth and Life Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2008a). Ballistic Imaging. Committee to Assess the Feasibility, Accuracy and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database. Committee on Law and Justice and Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2008b). Evaluating Research Efficiency in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Committee on Evaluating the Efficiency of Research and Development Programs at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2009a). Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Fourth Edition. Committee on National Statistics. C.F. Citro, M.E. Martin, and M.L. Straf, Editors. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2009b). Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward. Committee on Identifying the Needs of the Forensic Science Community. Committee on Science, Technology, and Law and Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2010). Strengthening the National Institute of Justice. Committee on Assessing the Research Program of the National Institute of Justice. Committee on Law and Justice, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2011). Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research: A Workshop Summary. Committee on Measuring Economic and Other Returns on Federal Research Investments. Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

National Research Council. (2012). Best Practices in Assessment of Research and Development Organizations. Panel for Review of Best Practices in Assessment of Research and Development Organizations. Laboratory Assessments Board. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2014). Furthering America’s Research Enterprise. Committee on Assessing the Value of Research in Advancing National Goals. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council and Federal Judicial Center. (2011). Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence: Third Edition. Committee on the Development of the Third Edition of the Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence; Committee on Science, Technology, and Law; Policy and Global Affairs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Science Foundation. (2014). Investing in Science, Engineering, and Education for the Nation’s Future: Strategic Plan for 2014-2018. Washington, DC: National Science Foundation. Available: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14043/nsf14043.pdf [May 2015].

Nelson, M. (2010). Making sense of DNA backlogs—Myths vs. reality. NIJ Journal, 266. Available: http://www.nij.gov/journals/266/Pages/backlogs.aspx [June 2015].

Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences. (2015). Reviewer’s Checklist: FY2015 Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes Application Rating Sheet. Washington, DC: Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice.

Office of Justice Programs. (2013). OJP Standard Operation Procedure of OJP Peer Review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

O’Leary, A.E., Oberacher, H., Hall, S.E., and Mulligan, C.C. (2015). Combining a portable tandem mass spectrometer with automated library searching: An important step toward streamlined, onsite identification of forensic evidence. Analytical Methods, 7, 3331-3339.

Transportation Research Board. (2013). Letter Report on Review of the U.S. DOT Strategic Plan for Research, Development, and Technology 2013-2018. Committee for Review of the U.S. Department of Transportation Strategic Plan for Research, Development, and Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

U.S. Department of Justice. (2013). Charter: National Commission on Forensic Science. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Available: http://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/ncfs/legacy/2014/05/13/ncfs-charter.pdf [June 2015].

U.S. Government Accountability Office. (2013). DOJ Could Improve Decision-Making Documentation and Better Assess Results of DNA Backlog Reduction Program Funds. GAO-13-605. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office.

van Achterberg, T., Schoonhoven, L., and Grol, R. (2008). Nursing implementation science: How evidence-based nursing requires evidence-based implementation. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 40(4), 302-310.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 76
Next: Appendixes »
Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $46.00 Buy Ebook | $36.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Reliable and valid forensic science analytic techniques are critical to a credible, fair, and evidence-based criminal justice system. There is widespread agreement that the scientific foundation of some currently available forensic science methods needs strengthening and that additional, more efficient techniques are urgently needed. These needs can only be met through sustained research programs explicitly designed to ensure and improve the reliability and validity of current methods and to foster the development and use of new and better techniques. This task is challenging due to the broad nature of the field.

Concerns have been raised repeatedly about the ability of the criminal justice system to collect and analyze evidence efficiently and to be fair in its verdicts. Although significant progress has been made in some forensic science disciplines, the forensic science community still faces many challenges. Federal leadership, particularly in regard to research and the scientific validation of forensic science methods, is needed to help meet the pressing issues facing state and local jurisdictions.

This report reviews the progress made by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to advance forensic science research since the 2009 report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward and the 2010 report, Strengthening the National Institute of Justice. Support for Forensic Science Research examines the ways in which NIJ develops its forensic science research priorities and communicates those priorities as well as its findings to the scientific and forensic practitioner communities in order to determine the impact of NIJ forensic science research programs and how that impact can be enhanced.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!