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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
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Appendix A


Speakers

FIRST COMMITTEE MEETING, FEBRUARY 25-26

Committee Charge and Sponsor Expectations for Study

  • Howard Spivak, Deputy Director, National Institute of Justice
  • Gerry LaPorte, Director, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice

Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States Report Brief

  • Anne-Marie Mazza, Director, Committee on Science, Technology, and the Law, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Strengthening the National Institute of Justice Report Brief

  • Jay Siegel, Member, Committee on Strengthening the National Institute of Justice
  • George Sensabaugh, Vice Chair, Committee on Strengthening the National Institute of Justice (via telecom)

SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING, APRIL 1-2

Strengthening Science at NIJ

  • John Laub, Distinguished University Professor, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

Standards and Practices of Forensic Science from a NIST perspective

  • John Butler, NIST Fellow and Special Assistant to the Director for Forensic Science, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark Stolorow, Director, Law Enforcement Standards Office, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation Process

  • Gerry LaPorte, Director, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice
  • Danielle McLeod-Henning, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice

PI Panel on Impact of Research

  • Bruce McCord, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University (video conference)
  • John Nelson, Principal Scientist, General Electric Global Research

Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences Budget

  • Gerry LaPorte, Director, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice

NIJ Peer Review Panels

  • Phillip Danielson, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver
  • Eric Bartelink, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, California State University, Chico (teleconference)

Standing Review Panels at NIJ

  • Eric Buel, Laboratory Director, State of Vermont Forensic Laboratory (retired)
  • Brooke Weinger Kammrath, Associate Professor, Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven (video conference)
  • Martin Wells, Professor and Chair, Cornell University (video conference)

Advancing Forensic Science at NIJ (video conference)

  • Greg Ridgeway, Associate Professor of Criminology, Director of the M.S. Program in Criminology, University of Pennsylvania
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

PI Panel

  • Ann Bunch, Interim Chair, Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, State University of New York–Brockport
  • Cedric Nuemann, Associate Professor, South Dakota State University (video conference)
  • Hanlee Ji, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Stanford University (video conference)

THIRD COMMITTEE MEETING, MAY 7-8

Conversation with the NIJ Director

  • Nancy Rodriguez, Director, National Institute of Justice

Past NIJ Director Discussion (via video conference)

  • Jeremy Travis, President, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Federal Forensic Sector

  • Mark Weiss, Division Director, National Science Foundation (retired)
  • Kelsey Cook, Program Director, National Science Foundation
  • Thomas Callaghan, Chief Biometrics Scientist, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Rick Tontarski, Chief Scientist, Defense Forensic Science Center

Center of Excellence—Transitioning Products Out to the Community

  • John Morgan, Senior Director, RTI International Center for Forensic Sciences
  • Nicole McCleary, Forensic Technology Center of Excellence Project Manager, RTI International
  • Jeri Ropero-Miller, Forensic Technology Center of Excellence Project Director, RTI International (via telecom)

Technology Working Groups

  • George Herrin, Deputy Director, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Division of Forensic Science
  • Mike Gorn, Supervisor, Forensic Services Unit, Sarasota County Sheriff
  • Steve Renteria, CODIS Administrator/DNA Tech Lead, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×

OIFS Dissemination/Strategic Plan

  • Gerry LaPorte, Director, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice
  • Danielle McLeod-Henning, Program Manager, Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences, National Institute of Justice

Perspectives of Forensic Labs

  • Peter Stout, Chief Operations Officer, Houston Forensic Science Center
  • Kristine Olsson, Forensic Scientist, Johnson County Sheriff’s Office Crime Laboratory
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Support for Forensic Science Research: Improving the Scientific Role of the National Institute of Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21772.
×
Page 82
Next: Appendix B: Previous Report Recommendations »
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Reliable and valid forensic science analytic techniques are critical to a credible, fair, and evidence-based criminal justice system. There is widespread agreement that the scientific foundation of some currently available forensic science methods needs strengthening and that additional, more efficient techniques are urgently needed. These needs can only be met through sustained research programs explicitly designed to ensure and improve the reliability and validity of current methods and to foster the development and use of new and better techniques. This task is challenging due to the broad nature of the field.

Concerns have been raised repeatedly about the ability of the criminal justice system to collect and analyze evidence efficiently and to be fair in its verdicts. Although significant progress has been made in some forensic science disciplines, the forensic science community still faces many challenges. Federal leadership, particularly in regard to research and the scientific validation of forensic science methods, is needed to help meet the pressing issues facing state and local jurisdictions.

This report reviews the progress made by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to advance forensic science research since the 2009 report, Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward and the 2010 report, Strengthening the National Institute of Justice. Support for Forensic Science Research examines the ways in which NIJ develops its forensic science research priorities and communicates those priorities as well as its findings to the scientific and forensic practitioner communities in order to determine the impact of NIJ forensic science research programs and how that impact can be enhanced.

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