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Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation (2015)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Organizing
Committee Members and Workshop
Speakers

CHAIR

Sarah C.R. Elgin is Professor of Biology, Professor of Genetics, Professor of Education, and Victor Hamburger Professor of Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis (WU). She developed an interest in biochemistry/molecular biology in high school, so majored in chemistry at Pomona College. A summer spent at Caltech led to an interest in the role of chromatin structure in control of gene expression that continues to the present. Completing a PhD with James Bonner exploring the role of nonhistone chromosomal proteins, Dr. Elgin also did postdoctoral research at Caltech with Leroy Hood, working to develop tools to characterize chromatin in Drosophila. Following a move to a faculty position at Harvard, work with her students led both to a method to determine the distribution of specific proteins in the polytene chromosomes using immunofluorescence, and to methods for analyzing the nucleosome array, including identification of accessible regulatory sites. Work at WU led to a detailed picture of the chromatin structure of an inducible gene, hsp26, and to the identification of Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1), shown by genetic and cytological analysis to play a key role in heterochromatin formation and gene silencing. Current work focuses on the establishment of heterochromatin, investigating both targeting mechanisms and maintenance. Dr. Elgin has taught undergraduate and graduate lecture/discussion courses on chromatin structure/function; a large introductory course in molecular genetics (lecture/ lab/ discussion); a lecture/lab course on genetics for non-science majors; “DNA Science” both for K-8 and high school teachers; phage bioinformatics for freshmen; and an upper level lab course that engages junior/senior undergraduates in research in Drosophila genomics. She served as Director for WU’s HHMI Undergraduate Biological Sciences Education Program from 1992-2004, and has been an HHMI Professor since 2002. In 2006 she founded the Genomics Education Partnership (http://gep.wustl.edu) to engage undergraduates in genomics research, and continues to direct this project. Dr. Elgin has received awards for her contributions to science education from ASCB, ASBMB, and GSA, and is a Fellow of AAAS and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She currently serves on the editorial boards of Chromatin & Epigenetics and CBE-Life Science Education, as well as the Board on Life Sciences (NAS), the SAB for iPLANT, and the Advisory Board for CourseSource.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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COMMITTEE

Gita Bangera is currently Dean of Undergraduate Research at Bellevue College, a community college in Bellevue, WA. She is a PULSE (Partnership for Undergraduate Life Science Education) leadership fellow and Principal Investigator of an NSF-supported project, C-ARE: ComGen - Authentic Research Experience Expansion. She is also Adjunct Professor in Plant Pathology at Washington State University, and an inventor and technical consultant for Intellectual Ventures with over 75 patent applications. As Dean she is building a new division called RISE Learning Institute focused on bringing Research, Innovation, Service and Experiential Learning to curricula across the Bellevue College campus. Dr. Bangera was invited to be a participant in the community that helped develop the recommendations in the AAAS report, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education, because of her early work with the ComGen program which introduced undergraduates at community colleges to authentic research experiences. ComGen has been profiled as a pioneering program by Science magazine (13 Sept. 2011). Faculty from approximately 15 institutions (colleges and universities) in Washington State are trained and are now implementing the ComGen pedagogical technique. Her current focus is the impact of classroom based undergraduate research as a way to diversify the scientific community. Previously Dr. Bangera was a Senior Scientist at Combimatrix Corporation and conducted Post-doctoral Research at Harvard Medical School, University of Washington Medical School, and University of Copenhagen. She received her doctorate in Microbiology at Washington State University, Master’s in Biology from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Master’s in Microbiology from University of Mumbai.

Sean M. Decatur became the 19th president of Kenyon College on July 1, 2013. He served previously as the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Oberlin College. He also was a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Oberlin. Dr. Decatur joined the faculty at Mount Holyoke College in 1995 as an assistant professor of chemistry. As an associate professor of chemistry, he served as department chair from 2001-04. In 2005, he was appointed the Marilyn Dawson Sarles Professor of Life Sciences. He also was an associate dean of faculty for science from 2005-08. On the faculty at Mount Holyoke, Decatur helped establish a top research program in biophysical chemistry. He also developed unique courses, including a race-and-science lecture series; a course exploring ethical, social, and political questions related to scientific topics; and a team-taught course that integrates introductory biology and chemistry. During his time as dean and under his leadership at Oberlin, Dr. Decatur helped lead a review of major curricular requirements with a number of significant changes under way that have brought more focus to the academic program. He also helped strengthen the Oberlin faculty and planned a new system for post-tenure faculty review and pushed for a deep curricular connection between Oberlin College and the Allen Memorial Art Museum. He has won research grants from NSF and NIH and from private foundations including the Alzheimer’s Association, Dreyfus Foundation, and Research Corporation for Science Advancement. He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and has received a number of national awards for his scholarship, including a NSF CAREER award in 1999 and a Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award in 2003. He was named an Emerging Scholar of 2007 by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine.

He earned a bachelor’s degree at Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry at Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

Erin Dolan has held tenure-track and tenured faculty positions at Virginia Tech and the University of Georgia, where she also held the position of Senior Scholar in Biology Education. Dolan is the founding Executive Director of the Texas Institute for Discovery Education in Sciences (TIDES) in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin. The mission of TIDES is to catalyze, support, and showcase innovative, evidence-based undergraduate science education. TIDES promotes experiential learning for undergraduates, especially through research experiences such as the Freshman Research Initiative (https://cns.utexas.edu/fri) and summer research internships. TIDES also offers professional development on teaching for current and future faculty, and conducts education studies to evaluate program efficacy and impact and inform future programmatic directions. Dolan’s research focuses on understanding science research as an educational context. Her group studies scalable ways of engaging high school and undergraduate students in science research, mentoring of undergraduate researchers, and research as a mechanism for undergraduates to access to social capital within the scientific community, especially for students from backgrounds that are underrepresented in the sciences. She is principal investigator or co-investigator on more than $6 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other agencies. Her work has been published in peer-reviewed journals read by scientists, teachers, and education researchers. Dolan is also Editor-in-Chief of CBE – Life Sciences Education (http://www.lifescied.org/), which has been described as the premier journal of biology education research and practice. She has been an invited speaker at national meetings of scientific societies such as the American Society for Cell Biology and American Society of Plant Biologists. Dr. Dolan earned a B.A. in Biology at Wellesley College and Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of California at San Francisco.

Laura Guertin’s is Professor of Earth Science at the Pennsylvania State University, Brandywine. Her primary research focus is the effective integration of innovative technologies to improve student learning in introductory-level geoscience courses. Research projects with students have included using Palm Pilots, iPods, GPS, Google Earth, and other technological tools for geoscience research and outreach. She has been awarded the Penn State – Commonwealth College Award for Teaching Excellence, Penn State’s George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching, and in 2009 was recognized at the national level with the Biggs Earth Science Teaching Award, an award that places her in the Geology Hall of Fame. She is the campus coordinator for the environmental inquiry minor. She has received funding from NSF, EPA, and the Society of Women Environmental Professionals. She is a co-principal investigator on a $9.2 million NSF-Targeted Math Science Partnership grant to improve middle school Earth and space science teaching in Pennsylvania. She is the past chair of the Geoscience Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research and a former councilor-at-large with the National Association of Geoscience Teachers. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association and serves on the Board of Trustees of Tyler Arboretum. She blogs for the American Geophysical Union (AGU) on geoscience education and educational technology at GeoEd Trek. Dr. Guertin received her B.A. in Geology from Bucknell University and her Ph.D. in Marine Geology and Geophysics from the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. In 2015 she was named one of the Top 100 Women in STEM by INSIGHT into Diversity magazine and a Fellow of the Geological Society of America.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

Wendy Newstetter served as the Director of Learning Sciences Research in Georgia Tech’s Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) from 2000-2012, where she pioneered the development of problem-driven environments for learning. These efforts resulted in the BME department winning the 2013 Georgia Regents Excellence in Teaching Award for departments. These problem-driven models for educational reform were informed by ethnographic investigations of the cognitive and learning practices found in interdisciplinary research laboratories or in vivo settings and then translated into in vitro models for interdisciplinary classes and instructional laboratories. This authentic to synthetic or translational model of educational reform seeks to achieve greater fidelity between the socio-cognitive practices deployed on the frontiers of science and those that students are apprenticed to in science and engineering classrooms and instructional laboratories. Science as Psychology: Sense-Making and Identity in Science, the book reporting on research findings in tissue and neuroengineering laboratories, co-authored by Dr. Newstetter, won the American Psychological Association William James Book Award in 2012. As a senior editor for the Journal of Engineering Education from 2009-2012, she conceived and instituted Special Issues to promote a greater focus on important topics in engineering education. In 2012, Dr. Newstetter was named a top twenty engineering and science professor in Georgia. She is most recently the PI on an NSF I-Corps Learning grant to explore translating a learning innovation into a viable commercial product. She received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Lancaster University in the United Kingdom.

Elvyra San Juan leads the Capital Planning, Design and Construction (CPDC) department in providing system wide management, administration and long-range planning of the physical development aspects of The California State University (CSU). This includes preparation and administration of an annual state and non-state capital outlay program. Ms. San Juan provides system wide policy leadership for development of the campuses and provides training utilizing campus model practices and lessons learned to improve the twenty-three campuses and their off-campus centers. Responsibilities also include land use and environmental planning, sustainability, public/private partnerships, utility management, and maintenance of the systemwide physical plant. She has been a leader in a innovative initiative, “The Campus as a Living Laboratory,” to provide opportunities for faculty and students across the 23 campuses of the CSU system to work with leaders of the physical plants on those campuses to undertake research that benefits those communities. She is a member of the National Association of College and University Business Officers, the U.S. Green Building Council, the Society of College and University Planning, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers. She received a bachelors degree at San Jose State University and postbaccalaureate education at the University of California, Berkeley.

Mary Smith is Professor of Biology and Chairperson of the Department of Biology at North Carolina A & T State University. She has led in transforming the biology program to embrace student-centered instruction, and in motivating biology faculty to adopt active learning practices in the classroom. Collaborating with STEM Chairpersons and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, she contributed to developing a STEM Center of Excellence for Active Learning. Under her leadership, the Department of Biology has become an enriched environment for undergraduate research in offering multiple research based-courses, the Genomics Education Partnership program, Science Education Alliance-Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) project, and other sophomore research courses that include wet-lab or survey research experiences. She has procured multi-million dollars in federal

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

funding to support research training for undergraduate and graduate students and to enhance research infrastructure and faculty development at North Carolina & T. She is PI/PD of the Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) program; former PI/PD of a Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Needs (GAANN) program, and former PI/PD for NIH/NCI P20 Feasibility Cancer grant award that focused on junior faculty development in research. Dr. Smith is the recipient of several recognitions and awards, a Ford Foundation Fellowship; North Carolina-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Outstanding Mentor Award; North Carolina A & T College of Arts and Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching; the University of North Carolina (UNC) Board of Governor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching; and a Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE) Vision & Change Leadership Fellow. Dr. Smith earned her BS degree from Morgan State University in Baltimore, MD, Ph.D. in Plant Science at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY and did postdoctoral work at Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI.

Gabriela Weaver serves as Vice Provost for Faculty Development, and Director for the Center for Teaching and Faculty Development, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Colorado at Denver from 1994 to 2001. During that time she shifted the focus of her research work from physical chemistry to STEM education. From 2001 to 2014 she served on the faculty at Purdue University as Associate Professor and Professor of Chemistry and Science Education and later as the Jerry and Rosie Semler Director of the Discovery Learning Research Center. She served for one year as the Associate Head of the Department of Chemistry, resigning that position to become the Director of the DLRC. In 2012, Weaver was elected as fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to transforming science education at the undergraduate and pre-college levels through the use of inquiry-based pedagogies and innovative technologies. Weaver has been a co-author on two different first-year chemistry textbooks, numerous book chapters on topics in science education and the 2015 book Transforming Institutions: Undergraduate STEM Education for the 21st Century. From 2004-2012, she served as Director of the NSF-funded multi-institutional CASPiE project (Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education) dedicated to involving first- and second-year undergraduate students in real research experiences as part of their regular laboratory course curricula. Her research interests include the development, implementation and evaluation of instructional practices that engage students and improve their understanding of science, and the institutionalization of such practices through the transformation of cultures and processes in higher education. Dr. Weaver received her B.S. degree in Chemistry in 1989 from the California Institute of Technology and her Ph.D. in Chemical Physics in 1994 from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Susan R. Wessler is the Neil A. and Rochelle A. Campbell Presidential Chair for Innovations in Science Education and Distinguished Professor of Genetics at the University of California Riverside and home secretary of the National Academy of Sciences. She is a molecular geneticist known for her contributions to the field of transposon biology, specifically on the roles of plant transposable elements in gene and genome evolution. Her laboratory has pioneered the use of computational and experimental analyses in the identification of actively transposing elements. Following a position as postdoctoral fellow of the American Cancer Society at the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1980-1982 she began her career at the University of Georgia in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

1983 where she remained until moving to the University of California, Riverside in 2010. Dr. Wessler has contributed extensively to educational initiatives, including co-authorship of the widely used genetics textbook, Introduction to Genetic Analysis, and the popular reference book The Mutants of Maize. As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor, she adapted her research program for the classroom by developing the Dynamic Genome Courses where incoming freshman can experience the excitement of scientific discovery in the state-of-the art Neil A. Campbell Science Learning Laboratory. She is the recipient of several awards including the Creative Research Medal (1991) and the Lamar Dodd Creative Research Award (1997) from the University of Georgia, the Distinguished Scientist Award (2007) from the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), the Stephen Hales Prize (2011) from the American Society of Plant Biologists, the Excellence in Science Award from FASEB (2012) and the McClintock Prize (2014) from the Maize Genetics Community. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society (2012). She received her bachelor’s degree in biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1974 and her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Cornell University in 1980.

SPEAKERS

Elizabeth Ambos is Executive Officer for the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), the leading non-profit organization providing undergraduate research programs, services, and advocacy to close to 11,000 members at more than 740 member institutions. Prior to becoming Executive Officer in May 2012, she served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Initiatives and Partnerships at the California State University Chancellor’s office, from 2006-2012. In this capacity, she supported California State University (CSU) system research and sponsored programs efforts. Before her appointment at the CSU system office, Beth Ambos held several administrative appointments at California State University, Long Beach, including Associate Vice President for Research and External Support, Graduate Dean and Associate Dean in the College of Natural Sciences in Mathematics. She held a professorship in the Department of Geological Sciences at CSULB, and her research, and that of her students, has focused on two main areas: crustal and upper mantle structure, particularly at plate boundary zones; and high resolution geophysical imaging of shallow subsurface features, principally active faults and archaeological sites.

David Asai is Senior Director in Science Education at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He directs the HHMI Undergraduate and Graduate programs, which include: (i) grants to colleges, research universities, and HHMI Professors; (ii) research fellowships to undergraduates, graduate students, and medical students; and (iii) the Science Education Alliance. Before moving to HHMI in 2008, David was on the faculty for 19 years at Purdue University where he was Head of Biological Sciences, and for 5 years at Harvey Mudd College where he was Stuart Mudd Professor and Chair of Biology. He is an elected member of the Purdue Teaching Academy and was inducted into Purdue’s “Book of Great Teachers.” David served as a member of the boards of trustees of the National PTA and the Higher Learning Commission-North Central Association, and on the advisory committee to the Biology Directorate of the National Science Foundation. Currently, he serves on several advisory committees, including the Progress Through Calculus

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

project of the Mathematical Association of America, the Interdisciplinary Teaching About Earth for a Sustainable Future (InTeGrate) NSF STEP center, the University of Delaware NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation project, the Minority Affairs Committee of the American Society for Cell Biology, Understanding Interventions, the Committee on Opportunities in Science (COOS) of the AAAS, Research Enhancement for BUILDing Detroit, and the NIH Advisory Committee of the Director’s Working Group on Diversity. Dr. Asai received the B.S. in chemistry and M.S. in biology from Stanford University, and the Ph.D. in biology from the California Institute of Technology. He was a Muscular Dystrophy Association postdoctoral fellow at Caltech, and an NIH NRSA postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Until 2010 when he closed his lab, his group studied the structure and functional diversity of the molecular motor dynein in sea urchins and Tetrahymena thermophila.

Betsy Beise is a Professor of Physics and the Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Programs at the University of Maryland College Park. Her current responsibilities include oversight of the development and implementation of new academic programs and oversight of graduate and undergraduate curriculum changes across the campus. In 1998, she received the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from the American Physical Society (APS), which recognizes outstanding achievement by a woman physicist in the early years of her career. From 2004 to 2006, she was a Program Director for Nuclear Physics at the National Science Foundation. In 2008, she received the Physics department’s George Snow Award for helping to advance the representation of women in the field of physics and she was a co-PI on UMD’s NSF-ADVANCE grant to support retention and recruitment of women faculty. In 2012 she was recognized as a UMD Distinguished Scholar Teacher. Dr. Beise earned her B.A. in Physics from Carleton College, and her Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Elizabeth S. Boylan directs the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s programs on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Higher Education, both for the education and professional advancement of underrepresented groups and for the improvement of student learning and performance in STEM fields. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Teagle Foundation, and is a Fellow of Education section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In December 2015 she begins a term on the Advisory Committee for NSF’s Directorate of Education and Human Resources. Dr. Boylan came to the Sloan Foundation in 2011, after 16 years at Barnard College where she served as Provost and Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Biological Sciences. There she led many efforts on faculty career enhancement, curriculum reform, international education, and capital projects. She served on the Commission for Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, the Leadership Network for International Education of the American Council on Education, and the Advisory Board of Project Kaleidoscope. Prior to her work at Barnard, Boylan was associate provost for academic planning and programs at Queens College/CUNY. As a tenured member of the biology faculty at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center, she served as Deputy Chair of Graduate Studies in Biology, chaired of the Queens College Academic Senate, and co-chaired University task forces on STEM reform and on secondary education. Research in her laboratory was supported by the National Cancer Institute and the American Federation for Aging Research, as well as University grants. A specialist in developmental biology and hormonal carcinogenesis,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

Boylan earned a Ph.D. from Cornell University and a bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College. She was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole and a postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry and oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Sara Brownell is an Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. She received a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University, a M.S. in Biology from The Scripps Research Institute, and a Ph.D. in Biology and M.A. in Education, both from Stanford University. Sara completed postdoctoral training in biology education research at San Francisco State University and the University of Washington. Trained as a neuroscientist and turned full-time education researcher, she teaches undergraduate biology courses while building a research program in biology education at ASU. Her main research interests focus on exploring the impact of course-based research experiences on students and faculty, identifying gender differences in undergraduate biology, and developing tools for biology departments to use to align with the goals of Vision and Change.

James Burnette’s passion is bringing authentic research into the classroom . During the past ten years, he has developed college and high school courses where students learn state-of-the art techniques and bioinformatics skills and apply them to novel research projects. Along with Dr. Susan Wessler, he has developed the plug-and-play model for the Dynamic Genome (DG) course for freshmen at UC, Riverside. In this model all sections of the course use the same curriculum for the first half. During this time students learn core biological concepts and research techniques. In the second half of the course, a faculty member “plugs” in with a module related to ongoing research in the lab while the DG staff continue to handle the routine administration. The DG staff work with the professor to modify protocols and employ scientific teaching principles in module design. The plug-and-play model decreases the time required to develop and offer an authentic research experience to undergraduates and increases faculty buy-in. Over the past three years, seven professors and post-docs have “plugged” into the course. To enrich the DG experience for students, he has initiated a program where former DG students serve as undergraduate laboratory assistants. These students perform most of the duties of a graduate teaching assistant in addition to near-peer mentoring. Finally, he runs a robust outreach program to increase the excitement of middle and high school students in scientific research.

William David Burns is the Executive Director of the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement, co-founder and principal investigator of SENCER, publisher of Science Education and Civic Engagement - An International Journal, and research professor in the Department of Science and Technology at Stony Brook University. Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities (SENCER), aims to improve STEM learning and strengthen civic capacity by connecting learning to the most compelling civic issues of our day. Established in 2001, SENCER, now national in scope, has been called a “community of transformation” (Kezar, 2015) in a recent study of STEM reform networks sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Burns also currently serves, or has recently served, as principal investigator for several of the National Center’s projects and programs, including: the Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship Through Education Network (GLISTEN) project, supported by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the EPA; the W.M. Keck Foundation-supported Science and Civic Engagement Western Network (SCEWestNet); SENCER-ISE, an NSF and Noyce Foundation supported initiative to connect formal science education at the college level with informal science educators; Engaging Mathematics, an NSF-supported program to apply the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
×

SENCER approach to college-level mathematics courses, with the goal of using civic issues to make math more relevant to students; and, with the support of the Institute for Museum and Library Services, Partnership Champions: Creating the SENCER-ISE eMentor Program. A Woodrow Wilson National Fellow, Burns (along with SENCER co-founder, Karen Oates) were the recipients of the American Society for Cell Biology’s Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education.

Goldie S. Byrd is Professor of Biology and Dean for the College of Arts and Sciences at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Dr. Byrd received her PhD at Meharry Medical College and has served on the faculties at Tennessee State University and North Carolina Central University. In addition, she has served as visiting professor of genetics at UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University. Prior to becoming Dean, Dr. Byrd was Chair of Biology and the Nathan F. Simms Endowed Professor of Biology. Dr. Byrd has contributed significantly to research and training in STEM disciplines and was a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM). Dr. Byrd co-founded the North Carolina A&T Stem Center of Excellence for Active Learning where a mathematics emporiums and scale-up laboratories were created to advance active learning in STEM disciplines. She serves on numerous panels and study sections for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, the North Carolina Institute of Medicine, and the Alzheimer’s Association.

A. Malcolm Campbell earned his Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology from The Johns Hopkins University in 1992. Campbell was awarded a Pew Teacher-Scholar postdoctoral fellowship during which Jan Serie at Macalester College taught him how to teach. Campbell is a Professor of Biology and the director of the James G. Martin Genomics Program at Davidson College. He is the founding director of the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT), which connects undergraduates with research-quality genomic learning materials. With his colleague Laurie Heyer, he wrote the first true genomics textbook for undergraduates, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics. He has received the American Society for Cell Biology’s Bruce Alberts Excellence in Education Award, the Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education, and the Hunter-Hamilton Love of Teaching award from Davidson College. He served as co-Editor-in-Chief of CBE-Life Sciences Education and is a charter member of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). His scholarship covers both education research and undergraduate-driven synthetic biology. Heyer and Campbell collaborate with their students to perform synthetic biology research. In August, 2014, Campbell, Heyer and Chris Paradise published an innovative introductory e-textbook that aligns very well with Vision and Change (www.bio.davidson.edu/icb).

Nicole Villa Cerveny is a Professor of Geography at Mesa Community College (MCC) who specializes in environmental sciences, conservation of cultural resources and undergraduate research. She obtained her doctorate from Arizona State University in 2005 under the direction of Guggenheim Fellow and Professor Ronald I. Dorn. Her research ranges from studying climatic relationships through quartz grains to the conservation and preservation of Native American rock art. Her research has been published in journals including Heritage Management, Physical Geography, Geoarchaeology, and Weatherwise. Although engaged in indigenous weaving techniques and local search and rescue activities, her current passion involves engaging first and second year college students in impactful undergraduate research experiences. She chairs the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Undergraduate Research Committee at MCC and coordinates the multidisciplinary undergraduate research laboratory. Over the past 5 years, Dr. Cerveny has facilitated workshops designed to engage first and second year college students in undergraduate research.

Edward J. Coyle is the John B. Peatman Distinguished Professor of ECE at Georgia Tech and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. He is the founder and director of the Vertically-Integrated Projects (VIP) Program, which integrates research and education by embedding large-scale, long term teams of undergraduates in the research efforts of faculty and their graduate students. Dr. Coyle was a co-recipient of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering’s 2005 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education. He was also a co-recipient of the American Society for Engineering Education’s 1997 Chester F. Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education and the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s 1986 Best Paper Award. Dr. Coyle was elected a Fellow of the IEEE for his contributions to the theory of nonlinear signal processing. His current research interests include undergraduate education, signal and information processing, and wireless sensor networks.

Arthur B. Ellis joined City University of Hong Kong as provost in September, 2010. Prior to joining CityU, he was vice chancellor for research at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Ellis joined UCSD after serving as chemistry division director at the U.S. National Science Foundation and as a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His honors include an inaugural NSF Director’s Distinguished Teaching Scholar Award for his contributions to teaching and research; an NSF Director’s Meritorious Service Award for his work as a division director; and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Robert Full received his doctoral degree from SUNY Buffalo, conducted a post doc at The University of Chicago and is a Chancellor’s and Goldman Professor of Integrative Biology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. Professor Full is the Director of the Poly-PEDAL Laboratory, the Center for interdisciplinary Bio-inspiration in Education and Research (CiBER), and a NSF supported Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT). Professor Full has authored over two hundred research contributions in animal motion science leading to the design of insect inspired search- and-rescue robots and gecko-inspired, self-cleaning, dry adhesives. Full has designed interdisciplinary, discovery-based learning laboratories featuring layered mentoring, guided inquiry, and mutualistic teaming resulting in authentic research publications. His mentoring of undergraduate researchers has resulted in over one hundred and thirty journal articles, proceedings or abstracts published with at least one undergraduate author. Professor Full received Berkeley’s Distinguished Teaching Award, was named Mentor in the Life Sciences by NAS, has briefed the US House of Representatives STEM Education Caucus on Undergraduate Research and American Innovation, and presented his ideas on discovery-based education at the Undergraduate Biology in the 21st Century Workshop, Council on Undergraduate Research Conference, NSF CCLI, Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities, Reinventing Undergraduate Education and TED Ed Meetings.

Sylvester James “Jim” Gates, Jr., is an American theoretical physicist. He received two B.S. degrees and a Ph.D. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the latter in 1977. His doctoral thesis was the first thesis at MIT to deal with supersymmetry. Gates is currently a University System Regents Professor, the John S. Toll Professor of Physics at the University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Maryland, College Park, the Director of the String and Particle Theory Center, and serves on President Barack Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and on the Maryland State Board of Education. He is known for his work on supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstring theory. In 1984, working with M.T. Grisaru, M. Rocek, W. Siegel, Gates co-authorized Superspace, the first comprehensive book on the topic of supersymmetry. He is a member of the board of trustees of Society for Science & the Public. Gates has been featured extensively on many NOVA PBS programs on physics, notably “The Elegant Universe” in 2003, and ‘‘The Fabric of the Cosmos’’ in 2011. In 2006, he completed a DVD series titled Superstring Theory: The DNA of Reality for The Teaching Company composed of 24 half-hour lectures to make the complexities of unification theory comprehensible to non-physicists. In 2012, he was named a University System of Maryland Regents Professor, only the sixth person to be so recognized since 1992. He is past president of the National Society of Black Physicists, and is a NSBP Fellow, as well as a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Physics in the U.K. He also is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. In 2013, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, becoming the first African-American physicist so recognized in its 150-year history. On November 16, 2013, Prof. Gates was awarded the Mendel Medal by Villanova University “in recognition of his influential work in supersymmetry, supergravity and string theory, as well as his advocacy for science and science education in the United States and abroad.” President Obama awarded Prof. Gates the National Medal of Science, the highest award given to scientists in the U.S., at a White House ceremony in 2013. He currently continues his research in supersymmetry in systems of particles, fields, and strings.

James M. Gentile is the Emeritus Dean and Kenneth G. Herrick Distinguished Professor of Biology at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and the past president of Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA), a Tucson, Az.-based foundation dedicated to science since 1912. He has conducted extensive research on the role of metabolism in the conversion of natural and xenobiotic agents into mutagens and carcinogens, with funding from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the World Health Organization, among many other public and private foundations. He received his Ph.D. from Illinois State University and undertook postdoctoral studies in the Department of Human Genetics at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is the author of more than 200 research articles, book chapters, book reviews and special reports and has active Blogs on Tumbler and the Huffington Post. He is the former editor-in-chief of the international journal Mutation Research, past President of the U.S. Environmental Mutagen Society and the International Association of Environmental Mutagen Societies, and a founding member of Project Kaleidoscope. He serves on several national Boards and Committees, including the Science Friday Foundation Board, the Cures Now Foundation Board, The Biosphere2 Board, and many committees and task forces for the National Academies of Science, The National Science Foundation, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the National Institutes of Health.

Jo Handelsman is the Associate Director for Science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, appointed by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate in June of 2014. Dr. Handelsman helps to advise President Obama on the implications of science for the Nation,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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ways in which science can inform U.S. policy, and on Federal efforts in support of scientific research. Dr. Handelsman is an expert in communication among bacteria that associate with soil, plants, and insects and helped pioneer the field of metagenomics, bridging agricultural and medical sciences. Handelsman is also recognized for her research on science education and women and minorities in science and in 2011 received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Mentoring. Dr. Handelsman co-chaired the PCAST working group that developed the 2012 report, “Engage to Excel,” which contained recommendations to the President to strengthen STEM education to meet the workforce needs of the next decade in the United States. Prior to joining OSTP, Dr. Handelsman was the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor and Frederick Phineas Rose Professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at Yale University. She received a B.S. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Graham Hatfull is Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. He received a B.Sc. (Hons) degree in Biological Sciences from Westfield College, University of London in 1978, and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Edinburgh University in 1981. He did postdoctoral work at Yale University in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry with Dr. Nigel Grindley, and at the Medical Research Council at Cambridge University, with Drs. Fred Sanger and Bart Barrell. He has been at the University of Pittsburgh since 1988 and served as Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences from 2003 to 2011. Dr. Hatfull’s research focuses on the molecular genetics of the mycobacteria and their bacteriophages, and their use for educational advancement. These studies take advantage of the intimacy of phage-host interactions to gain insights into the genetics and physiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human TB. Through integrated research-education programs such as the PHIRE and SEA-PHAGES programs, a large collection of completely sequenced mycobacteriophage genomes provides insights into viral diversity and evolution, and represents a rich toolbox of new approaches for understanding M. tuberculosis. Development of vector systems, selectable markers, recombineering approaches, expression tools, and insights into mycobacterial biofilms reflect some of the useful applications of this genomic resource. The SEA-PHAGES program implemented at over 80 institutions with over 3200 undergraduate students (2015-6) offers a transformative experience for freshman undergraduates engaging in research, with notable advances in both scientific insights and in learning gains. Highlights of Dr. Hatfull’s research accomplishments include publication of more than 160 peer-reviewed research articles, 35 book chapters or reviews, and four co-edited books. He has mentored 20 Ph.D. students, over 100 undergraduate student researchers, and 16 postdoctoral associates. Dr. Hatfull has received the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award at both the junior and senior level, the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, and is the Eberly Family Professor of Biotechnology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a teaching fellow of the National Academy of Science. He has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor since 2002.

James Hewlett currently serves as Professor of Biology and the Director of Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing at Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, NY. In addition to teaching, he serves as the Executive Director of the Community College Undergraduate Research Initiative (CCURI) – a National $4M NSF funded program under the Transforming

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Undergraduate Education in STEM (TUES) program. He is the New York Hub Director of the Northeast Biomanufacturing Center and Collaborative NBC2) and is the President and CEO of STEMsolutions, LLC, a New York based consulting firm specialized in developing customized higher education solutions to STEM curriculum reform efforts. In addition, he serves on the Editorial Board of the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science at the University of Buffalo and is on the Editorial Board of The American Society of Cell Biology’s CBE Life Sciences Education journal. He serves on the Advisory Board for Rochester Institute of Technology’s Center for Bioscience Education and Technology (CBET) and is a member of the Steering Committee for the University of Georgia’s RCN-UBE Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences Network (CUREnet).

Gail Hollowell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at North Carolina Central University (NCCU). She received her B.S. in Biology from NCCU and both her M.S. in Microbiology and Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Howard University in Washington, DC. Before returning to her alma mater, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship on eukaryotic gene expression at the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Hollowell currently serves as PI on Peer Mentoring and Technology as a Model for Enhancing Success in Science and Mathematics Persistence at NCCU, which is funded by the University of Pennsylvania Center for Minority Serving Institutions. She is also co-Director of NCCU’s HHMI science education grant which focuses on Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences. Dr. Hollowell is also an institutional participant in the Preparing Critical Future Faculty program, funded by the American Association of Colleges and Universities which focuses on STEM faculty development. In addition to her scholarly work, Dr. Hollowell has been recognized for her stellar teaching as a recipient of the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award, Department of Biology (2006) and the NCCU Award for Teaching Excellence (2007).

John R. Jungck is the Director of the Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratories at the University of Delaware. He is a tenured Professor of Biological Sciences and holds joint appointments in the Department of Mathematical Sciences and the Bioinformatics/Computational Biology Program. He is the former Editor of Biology International, Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching, and the American Biology Teacher. He currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals including the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, Evolutionary Bioinformatics, the American Journal of Undergraduate Research, and several others. He has also been the Editor of special issues of Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena and on Bio 2010 in CBE Life Science Education. He is the immediate past Vice President of the International Union of Biological Sciences, immediate past President of the IUBS Commission on Biology Education, and former Chairperson of the U. S. National Academy of Science’s National Committee of IUBS. His international commitments include long- term relations with NECTEC in Thailand, the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Evolution and Ecology in New Zealand, and BIOMAT – a consortium of South American mathematical biologists. He is the founder of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium (http://bioquest.org), He has served on Boards of such groups as the National Institute for Mathematical Biology Synthesis (NIMBioS) and Emerging Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS). His awards/honors/offices include AAAS Fellow, Honorary Doctorate from the University of Minnesota, ASCB Bruce Alberts Award, AIBS Education Award, EDUCOM Educational software and curriculum awards, former Chairperson of the Education Committee of the Society for Mathematical Biology, former

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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president of the Association of College and University Biology Educators, former president of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi chapters, and a Fulbright Scholar in Thailand.

Ryan Kelsey is a Program Officer for the Education Program at the Helmsley Charitable Trust where he primarily focuses on national work in undergraduate STEM education. He also contributes to the K-12 program in the area of teacher preparation and on effective uses of educational technology. Prior to coming to the Trust, Ryan spent 13 years at the Columbia University Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, most recently as the Director of Projects. At Columbia, Ryan led a team of educational technologists and design specialists partnering with faculty on innovative educational projects in the full range of academic disciplines, including simulations, case studies, health interventions and global learning initiatives with funding from multiple public and private sources. He has also served as an adjunct assistant professor and instructor at Teachers College and New York University, offering courses in the design and analysis of effective solutions for improving higher education classroom practice using purposeful technology. Ryan earned his Ed.D. and M.A. in Communication and Education from Teachers College and his B.S. in biology from Santa Clara University.

George M. Langford is Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Biology at Syracuse University and served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 2008-2014. For the academic year 2014-15, he is on sabbatical at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Science Education. Throughout his multi-faceted career, Professor Langford has maintained an interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research, service, and enterprise. Prior to SU, he served as dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Before that, he was the Ernest Everett Just Professor of Natural Sciences and professor of biological sciences at Dartmouth College. Dean Langford has also served on the faculty of The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, in addition to holding leadership positions at the National Science Foundation and the Marine Biology Laboratory (Woods Hole, Mass.). An accomplished visionary, Professor Langford was appointed by President Clinton to the National Science Board, the governing board of the National Science Foundation. He is the recipient of more than two-dozen awards and honors including the 2009 Professional Achievement Award from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in cell biology. He was elected an AAAS Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2013. He received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in 2001 from Beloit College.

Marcia C. Linn is Professor of Development and Cognition, specializing in science and technology in the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, Chair of the AAAS Education Section, and on the boards of the AAAS, the Educational Testing Service Graduate Record Examination, the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice, and the National Science Foundation Education and Human Resources Directorate. Awards include the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Award for Lifelong Distinguished Contributions to Science Education, the American Educational Research Association Willystine Goodsell Award, and the Council of Scientific Society Presidents first award for Excellence in Educational Research. Linn earned her Ph. D. at Stanford University where she worked with Lee Cronbach. She spent a year in Geneva working

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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with Jean Piaget, in Israel as a Fulbright Professor, and a year in London at University College. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences three times. Her books include Computers, Teachers, Peers (2000), Internet

Environments for Science Education (2004), Designing Coherent Science Education (2008), WISE Science (2009), and Science Teaching and Learning: Taking Advantage of Technology to Promote Knowledge Integration (2011). She chairs the Technology, Education—Connections (TEC) series for Teachers College Press.

Margot McDonald, AIA, NCARB, LEED BD+C is the Architecture Department Head at Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo. In the studio, her teaching focuses on integrated project delivery by working collaboratively with the disciplines of architecture, structural engineering, construction management, and landscape architecture on building/site proposals for real clients. She is the faculty advisor for an interdisciplinary Sustainable Environments minor, and chair-elect for the International Educational Advisory Council at Cal Poly. Professor McDonald is a licensed architect in the State of Oregon. She holds a Masters in Architecture degree from the University of Oregon as well as undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and French from the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is currently is a doctoral candidate (ABD) in the Geography Department at UC-Santa Barbara where she is designing a climate classification system for passive and low energy buildings in California.

Dave Micklos is founder and Executive Director of the DNA Learning Center (DNALC), the nation’s first science center devoted to public genetics education. An operating unit of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). With satellite centers in Nassau County and Harlem, the DNALC’s six teaching laboratories provide hands-on science experiences to 30,000 students per year. DNALC Asia, to open in 2016 in Suzhou, China, will have twice the capacity of the CSHL DNALC. Approximately 300,000 students per year use methods and commercial lab kits developed by the DNALC. The DNALC’s Internet portal and digital multimedia receive 7 million visitors and downloads annually. The DNALC’s textbooks – DNA Science, Laboratory DNA Science, and Genome Science – have been the basis for intensive lab or Internet training provided to more than 9,000 high school and college science teachers at workshops conducted in all 50 United States and 14 foreign countries. Dave received the 1990 Dana Award for Pioneering Achievement in Education, the 2011 Science Prize for Online Resources in Education, and the 2012 Genetics Society of America Award for Excellence in Education. He is an AAAS Fellow and is the only CSHL staff member to receive an honorary Doctorate from its Watson School of Biological Sciences.

Cathy Middlecamp is a Professor in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her scholarship focuses on designing, teaching, and assessing courses that connect environmental science to real-world societal issues. Middlecamp is the editor-in-chief of Chemistry in Context, a project of the American Chemical Society. She has served as the lead author for the chapters on air quality, acid rain, ozone depletion, nuclear energy, and sustainability. Cathy also serves as a senior scholar for SENCER (Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities). Middlecamp is a fellow of the Association for Women in Science (2003), of AAAS (2004), and of the American Chemical Society (2009). She also is the chair-elect of the ACS Division of Chemical Education and of the AAAS Division Q (Education).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Anne Rosenwald is an Associate Professor of Biology at Georgetown University, where she serves as Director of Georgetown’s innovative Biology of Global Health major. Her interests include bioinformatics education and she is a member of the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching and the Genomics Education Partnership. She is also member of the newly formed Network for Integrating Bioinformatics into Life Sciences Education. Finally, she is the developer of the Genome Solver Project, which takes advantage of the rich sequence data sources for comparative analysis of bacterial genomes.

Jeffrey Ryan is a Professor of Geology in the School of Geosciences at the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. He received his B.S. in Geology in 1983 from Western Carolina University, and his Ph.D. in 1989 from Columbia, with postdoctoral training at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. He is an active researcher the fields of igneous and metamorphic petrology, focusing on studies of the volcanic and metamorphic rocks encountered in modern and ancient convergent plate boundaries. He also pursues a range of geoscience education investigations, examining the instructional use of research instrumentation in undergraduate courses, the impacts of undergraduate research as an effective geoscience pedagogy, and innovative applications of geoinformatics and geospatial information platforms to facilitate student training in the tools of modern research. He was a National Science Foundation Program Director in the Division of Undergraduate Education from 2003-2005, and has since worked with geoscience faculty across the country to help them develop effective and potentially NSF-fundable interventions and instructional strategies for improving the undergraduate courses they teach. He has long been engaged in efforts to re-vision undergraduate education in the geosciences, as a co-convener of the ongoing "Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education" series of national meetings and workshops, and as the lead convener of the 2010 "Planning the Future of GeoCyberEducation" community workshop. He is a longstanding member and current Geoscience Division Councilor in the Council on Undergraduate Research, where he currently serves on the NCUR (National Conference on Undergraduate Research) Oversight Committee, helped develop and author the online resource collection "Undergraduate Research as Teaching Practice" (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/undergraduate_research/).

Troy D. Sadler is a Professor of Science Education at the University of Missouri (MU) with joint appointments in the College of Education and the Division of Biological Sciences. He serves as Director of the ReSTEM Institute: Reimagining & Researching STEM Education, a research and outreach center for K-12 STEM education. Sadler’s research focuses on how students negotiate complex socio-scientific issues and how these issues may be used as contexts for science learning. He is interested in how issues-based learning experiences can support student learning of science and development of practices essential for full participation in modern democratic societies. Sadler has also been involved with numerous efforts designed to create opportunities for undergraduates and high school students, particularly those from backgrounds underrepresented in the sciences, to engage in authentic scientific research experiences.

David Williamson Shaffer is a Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Educational Psychology and a Game Scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. Before coming to the University of Wisconsin, he was a teacher, teacher-trainer, curriculum developer, and game designer. Dr. Shaffer studies how new technologies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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change the way people think and learn, and his most recent book is How Computer Games Help Children Learn.

Sarah Simmons is Senior Program Officer, Science Education, at Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Sarah joined HHMI in 2014 and prior to that held the position of Assistant Dean for Honors, Research and International Study in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin where she administered multiple college initiatives including honors programs, international science initiatives and undergraduate research. Additionally, she was Director and PI of the HHMI- and NSF-funded Freshman Research Initiative (FRI) - a unique, large-scale program that engages undergraduates in research at The University of Texas at Austin.

Donald J. Wink is LSRI’s Director of Graduate Studies and Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Chemistry, where he served as Head for 2000-2005. Wink’s projects share a theme of crossing boundaries, often using student pathways for direction. In undergraduate chemical education he has NSF-supported materials development projects that led to a ‘math-aware’ preparatory chemistry textbook (Practice of Chemistry) and project-based laboratories (Working with Chemistry). He was co-PI for the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education that developed methods to have first and second year undergraduate chemistry students do research in their lab courses. Finally, he works in UIC’s innovative natural science general education program for students in the BA urban education major. He has also been very active on issues of teaching in K-12 settings, including on NSF GK-12 projects for intervention in schools. His Learning Sciences work focuses on learning in chemistry and on teacher development. In addition, he contributes regularly to questions of how particular constructs—such as relevance, constructivism, and inquiry—work in science and science education.

Robin Wright earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Georgia and a Ph.D. from Carnegie-Mellon University. After postdoctoral training at UC, Berkeley, she was on the faculty of the University of Washington (Zoology Department) for nearly 13 years. She moved to Minnesota in 2003, and is currently Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Initiatives in the College of Biological Sciences (CBS), Head of the Department of Biology Teaching and Learning, and professor of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development. Prior to focusing exclusively on undergraduate education, her lab used genetic, cell biological, ecological, and evolutionary approaches to explore cold adaptation. In addition, her laboratory was well known as a great place for undergraduates to pursue research. Over the past 21 years, she has mentored nearly 100 undergraduate researchers. Prof. Wright has experience teaching both large and small classes, including freshman seminars, large introductory biology courses, and skill-oriented courses for honors students. She helped to develop and co-teaches the Nature of Life program and has been a leader in the development of Foundations of Biology, an innovative, team-based introductory biology course for biological sciences majors. She leads HHMI- and NSF-supported initiatives to deliver discovery-based research experience for the thousands of majors and non-majors who take biology classes in the College of Biological Sciences. Prof. Wright has served on the Education Committee of the American Society for Cell Biology and was as chair of the Education Committee for the Genetics Society of America. In addition, she was a senior editor of the Journal, Life Science Education and is the founding Editor-in-Chief of a new biology curriculum journal called CourseSource. She is a member of the Executive Committee for the HHMI/National Academies of Science Summer Institute on Biology Education. She has been

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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named as a National Academies Biology Education Mentor for the past 12 years. She was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2012 and was recognized by the Genetics Society of America with the Elizabeth Jones Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Organizing Committee Members and WorkshopSpeakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum: Report of a Convocation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21851.
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Students who participate in scientific research as undergraduates report gaining many benefits from the experience. However, undergraduate research done independently under a faculty member's guidance or as part of an internship, regardless of its individual benefits, is inherently limited in its overall impact. Faculty members and sponsoring companies have limited time and funding to support undergraduate researchers, and most institutions have available (or have allocated) only enough human and financial resources to involve a small fraction of their undergraduates in such experiences.

Many more students can be involved as undergraduate researchers if they do scientific research either collectively or individually as part of a regularly scheduled course. Course-based research experiences have been shown to provide students with many of the same benefits acquired from a mentored summer research experience, assuming that sufficient class time is invested, and several different potential advantages. In order to further explore this issue, the Division on Earth and Life Studies and the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education organized a convocation meant to examine the efficacy of engaging large numbers of undergraduate students who are enrolled in traditional academic year courses in the life and related sciences in original research, civic engagement around scientific issues, and/or intensive study of research methods and scientific publications at both two- and four-year colleges and universities. Participants explored the benefits and costs of offering students such experiences and the ways that such efforts may both influence and be influenced by issues such as institutional governance, available resources, and professional expectations of faculty. Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum summarizes the presentations and discussions from this event.

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