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Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains (1996)

Chapter: Index of Foods

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Suggested Citation:"Index of Foods." National Research Council. 1996. Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2305.
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INDEX OF FOODS

afezu 261

African rice 17

akohi 83

arake 43

areuie 245

aromatic sorghums 181


baby food (see also weaning foods) 141

baked goods 297

baked products 308

barley 243

barley-water drinks (see also beverages) 245

beer 49, 53, 64, 81, 130, 141, 148, 168, 245, 249, 258, 299, 305

sorghum 168, 305

betso 25

beverages 43, 119, 146, 245

sweet beverages 262

bhunja 83

biscuits 148, 221

bogobe 300

bourgou 266

bread 43, 81, 83, 119, 141, 148, 215, 221, 239, 240, 243, 245, 297, 308, 309, 310

raised bread 308

sorghum 189

sourdough 300, 316

steamed 189

breakfast cereals 130

brown sugar 118, 298

buza 25


cakes 148, 221, 237

casseroles 221

chapati 83, 141

convenience foods 174, 297

cookies 221

couscous 13, 64, 81


dahl 310

dawa 148, 155

dosai 310

dough balls 148

drinn 260


Egyptian grass 267

einkorn 240

emmer 239

Ethiopian oats 248

extruding 304


famine food 271, 272

fast food (see also convenience foods) 73

fermented food 81, 310, 316

porridges 300

finger millet 298, 39

popped 298

flaking 302

flour 52, 141, 237, 244, 262, 285, 287, 310

sorghum 162

Power Flour 315

preprocessed 303

fonio 59, 298

fritters 237


gallettes 81

genfo 240

grass, Egyptian 267

gruel 6, 221, 313

guinea millet 237


high lysine sorghums 181


idli 310

infant foods (see also weaning foods) 53

injera 11, 215, 218, 219, 221, 222, 224, 226, 249


jagger, 118, 178, 298


Kashi 256

kimchee 300

kisra 81

kita 221, 239

kodo millet 249

koko 100

kram-kram 262

kreb 256


lahi 83

liqueur 267

liquors 245


malt 43, 48, 53, 141

malt extract 299

malted food 314

malted milk 299

malting 299

mao-tai 188

marsa 100

meal, sorghum 162

milk, mother's 312

millets

finger 39, 298

guinea 237

kodo 249

pearl 77, 298

shama 267

mother's milk 312

muffins 221

muk 221


nasha 300

noodles 189


oats, Ethiopian 248

obusera 300

ogi 81, 317

Ovaltine®299


pancakes 221, 221,

parboiled products 117, 162, 175, 301

pastries 297

pearl millet 77, 298

popping 118

sweet-stalk 125

phula 83

pickled vegetables 300

pickles 316

pilaf 302

Suggested Citation:"Index of Foods." National Research Council. 1996. Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2305.
×

pombe 148

popped products 43, 141

popping 63, 297

finger millet 298

pearl millet 118

sorghum 178, 298

porridge 6, 13, 43, 49, 81, 83, 100, 119, 146, 189, 221, 239, 240, 245, 261, 262, 314

fermented 300

sour 316

sour millet 300

sour sorghum 300

Power Flour 315

preprocessed flours 303

puddings 221

puffing 298

quality-protein sorghums 181

quick-cooking sorghums 180


raised bread 308

roti 81


samshu 188

sauerkraut 300, 316

semolina 64

shama millet 267

snacks 130

sorghum 127

aromatic 181

beer 168, 305, 189

flour 162

high-lysine 181

meal 162

molasses 186

popped 178, 298

quality-protein 181

quick-cooking 180

sugar 184

sweet 184, 188

syrup 184

tannin-free 179

vegetable 178

vitamin-A 178

white 309

soups 221, 245

sour porridges 316

millet 300

sorghum 300

sourdough 100, 300, 316

soy sauce 300, 316

spelt 240

starch 130

steamed breads 189

stews 221

sugar 125, 130

brown 118, 298

sorghums 184

sugarcane 184

sugar beet 184

sweet beverages 262

corn (maize) 117

sorghum 184, 188

sweet-stalk pearl millet 125

sweetmeats 267

syrup sorghums 184


tala 249

tannin-free sorghums 179

tchapalo 64

téhik 261

tef 215

toh 81, 100, 146, 155, 157

tortilla 218


ugali 146, 155

ugi 317

uji 146, 155


vegetable sorghum 178

vitamin-A sorghum 178


waffles 221

weaning food 55, 81, 312, 317

white sorghum 309

wild grains 251

wusu-wusu 64


yogurt 300

Suggested Citation:"Index of Foods." National Research Council. 1996. Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2305.
×
Page 367
Suggested Citation:"Index of Foods." National Research Council. 1996. Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2305.
×
Page 368
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Lost Crops of Africa: Volume I: Grains Get This Book
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Scenes of starvation have drawn the world's attention to Africa's agricultural and environmental crisis. Some observers question whether this continent can ever hope to feed its growing population. Yet there is an overlooked food resource in sub-Saharan Africa that has vast potential: native food plants.

When experts were asked to nominate African food plants for inclusion in a new book, a list of 30 species grew quickly to hundreds. All in all, Africa has more than 2,000 native grains and fruits--"lost" species due for rediscovery and exploitation.

This volume focuses on native cereals, including

  • African rice, reserved until recently as a luxury food for religious rituals.
  • Finger millet, neglected internationally although it is a staple for millions.
  • Fonio (acha), probably the oldest African cereal and sometimes called "hungry rice."
  • Pearl millet, a widely used grain that still holds great untapped potential.
  • Sorghum, with prospects for making the twenty-first century the "century of sorghum."
  • Tef, in many ways ideal but only now enjoying budding commercial production.
  • Other cultivated and wild grains.

This readable and engaging book dispels myths, often based on Western bias, about the nutritional value, flavor, and yield of these African grains.

Designed as a tool for economic development, the volume is organized with increasing levels of detail to meet the needs of both lay and professional readers. The authors present the available information on where and how each grain is grown, harvested, and processed, and they list its benefits and limitations as a food source.

The authors describe "next steps" for increasing the use of each grain, outline research needs, and address issues in building commercial production.

Sidebars cover such interesting points as the potential use of gene mapping and other "high-tech" agricultural techniques on these grains.

This fact-filled volume will be of great interest to agricultural experts, entrepreneurs, researchers, and individuals concerned about restoring food production, environmental health, and economic opportunity in sub-Saharan Africa.

Selection, Newbridge Garden Book Club

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