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The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
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C

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Jose Bauermeister, M.P.H., Ph.D., is the John G. Searle Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, and director of the Center for Sexuality & Health Disparities (SexLab) at the School of Public Health. Locally, Dr. Bauermeister has led an academic–community partnership focused on addressing the structural barriers fueling the HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) disparities faced by black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the Detroit Metro Area. Dr. Bauermeister is also principal investigator and co-investigator of several projects examining HIV/STI prevention among YMSM, with a focus on how to integrate existing (e.g., condom use) and forthcoming (e.g., Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis; rectal microbicides) prevention technologies into HIV/STI prevention for YMSM. In light of his expertise, he serves as a member of the Behavioral Science Working Group of the Microbicides Trials Network. Dr. Bauermeister is also co-investigator on several projects examining the social and behavioral correlates of young adult well-being, as measured by HIV/AIDS risk, substance use, and psychological well-being. He is co-investigator of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest prospective biomedical studies of perinatally infected adolescents in the United States. Dr. Bauermeister serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Youth & Adolescence, Archives of Sexual Behavior, AIDS and Behavior, and Health Education & Behavior. He is chair of the American Public Health Association’s HIV/AIDS Section.

Andre Blackman is a connected agent of change within the health community. He is very interested in the intersection of media, technology, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
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design as it relates to the sustainable improvement of public health and health care, as well as the stories that result from these new ideas. Through his consulting firm, Pulse + Signal, Andre aims to empower a new generation of thought leaders to do great work through digital branding, effective coaching, and strategic digital public relations/communications. He is passionate about purposefully connecting the organizations and leaders changing the health landscape in our society with the resources to create sustainable change. Andre has been involved in traditional and digital campaigns for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health focused on areas such as disease informatics, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes. Andre also serves on the following advisory boards: Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media; SXSW Interactive Conference Advisory Board; Center for Health Media & Policy; National Health Communications, and Marketing and Media Conference. He is the co-founder of the FastForward Health Film Festival—an event dedicated to highlighting the stories of forward thinking in health initiatives around the world.

Tamar Ginossar, Ph.D., teaches courses in health communication, including a class about health, culture, and diversity as part of the B.A./M.D. program at the University of New Mexico. Additional courses include advanced quantitative research methods, intercultural communication, and organizational communication. Dr. Ginossar has held two previous faculty appointments at the Department of Communication in Tel Aviv University and as research faculty with the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Her research interests focus on health communication and reducing health disparities. She is particularly interested in how communities and individuals are using new communication technologies for information exchange and advocacy. She lived and traveled internationally in the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Her research focuses on health communication and reducing health disparities. More specifically, Dr. Ginossar is interested in how communities and individuals are using new communication technologies for information exchange and advocacy, and in how they seek and share information, and in designing interventions using community-based research approaches to reduce health disparities.

Tessie Guillermo is the president and CEO of ZeroDivide, a consulting organization focusing on technology adoption and innovation to improve health, economic opportunity, and civic engagement of disadvantaged communities. Ms. Guillermo served for 15 years as CEO of the Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum, a national health policy/advocacy organization. She was appointed by President Clinton in 1999 as an inaugural member of the President’s Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ms. Guillermo recently completed a 10-year tenure as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

a member of the board of directors of The California Endowment, serving for 3 years as chairwoman. She serves as an executive member of the Board for Dignity Health, and is a board member of the Nonprofit Finance Fund and the California State University East Bay Education Foundation, where she graduated with a B.A. in economics. She is a graduate of the Gallup Leadership Institute and was a 1997 fellow of the Asian Pacific American Women’s Leadership Institute.

Ivor Horn, M.D., M.P.H., is medical director of the Center for Diversity and Health Equity at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Horn is a National Institutes of Health–funded researcher in the area of health communication with underrepresented racial and ethnic minority communities using mobile technology innovations. She is principal investigator on a study of a text-message-based health communication intervention to improve asthma outcomes in an urban disadvantaged population. Dr. Horn was also the project director as part of the collaborative team funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to develop technology-enabled tools to facilitate transitions in care for patients with sickle cell anemia at Children’s National Health Systems. The project, a collaboration between Children’s National Health Systems, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, The Lewin Group, the National Institute for Children’s Healthcare Quality, and Nemours, was part of AHRQ’s Accelerating Change and Transformation in Organizations and Networks (ACTION) Program. On a national level, Dr. Horn is a board member and communication director for the Academic Pediatric Association (the leading professional organization for general academic pediatrician researchers). Dr. Horn has served as first author on two seminal papers about the approach to child health disparities research. Dr. Horn is also a community-based primary care pediatrician with more than a decade of experience providing care and conducting research in communities of color.

Jimena Loveluck is president/CEO of the HIV/AIDS Resource Center (HARC) in Ypsilanti, Michigan. She has a master’s degree in social work from Boston College, specializing in community organization and social policy and planning. After completing her M.S.W. in 1990, Ms. Loveluck began working for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health AIDS Bureau, where she conducted HIV counseling and testing services in hospital and clinic settings, and also staffed the Massachusetts AIDS Hotline. Ms. Loveluck left the state level after 2 years to become director of HIV Services at Whittier Street Neighborhood Health Center, a federally qualified health center in Roxbury, Massachusetts. She returned to Michigan in 1999 and became the president/CEO of the HARC in November 2000. She

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

has been involved in community-based participatory research in collaboration with The Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health since 2009.

Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D., is a health scientist administrator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research and the program director for the Smart and Connected Health program at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Nilsen’s scientific focus is on the science of human behavior and behavior change, including using technology to better understand and improve health, adherence, the mechanisms of behavior change, and behavioral interventions in complex patients in primary care. More specifically, her efforts in mobile and wireless health (mHealth) research include serving as the NIH lead for the NSF/NIH Smart and Connected Health announcement, convening meetings to address methodology in mobile technology research, serving on numerous federal mHealth initiatives, and leading the NIH mHealth training institutes. Dr. Nilsen is also the chair of the Adherence Network, a trans-NIH effort to enhance and develop the science of adherence. She is also a member of the Science of Behavior Change, Health Economics, and HMO (health maintenance organization) Collaboratory working groups. These projects are initiatives funded through the Common Fund that target behavioral and social sciences research to improve health across a wide range of domains. Dr. Nilsen also chairs the NIH Integrating Health Strategies workgroup that supports the science of behavioral treatments for patients with multiple chronic conditions in primary care. At NSF, she leads the Smart Health program, which targets science at the intersection between computer science, engineering, medicine, and health, broadly defined.

Cameron Norman is the principal of CENSE Research + Design and an adjunct professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Cameron’s research interests focus on the intersection of systems science, design, and behavior science for health promotion and organizational change. The emphasis of his work is on program evaluation and modeling approaches to understanding complexity in social and health environments. Dr. Norman holds undergraduate and master’s degrees in psychology and a doctorate in public health sciences from the University of Toronto, and completed a Canadian Institutes of Health Research postdoctoral fellowship in Systems Thinking and Knowledge Translation jointly at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and the Centre for Global eHealth Innovation in Toronto. He recently completed a Master of Design in Strategic Foresight and Innovation at OCAD University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

Ruth Parker, M.D., is a professor of medicine at the Emory University School of Medicine. She is also associate director of the Faculty Development program in the Division of General Medicine, and holds a secondary appointment at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Parker has focused extensively on health care issues of underserved populations, particularly health literacy. She helped create a widely used measurement tool to quantify patients’ ability to read and understand health information. Dr. Parker currently serves as consultant and advisor to numerous federal agencies, professional societies, and members of industry on their initiatives related to health literacy.

Misha Pavel, Ph.D., is a professor of practice jointly appointed between the College of Computer and Information Sciences and the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University. Dr. Pavel came to Boston from the position of program director of Smart and Connected Health on a leave from Oregon Health and Science University where he was a professor at the Department of Biomedical Engineering, with a joint appointment in the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. He is also a visiting professor at Technical University of Tampere. Previously he served as chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering (he founded in 2001) and as director of the Point of Care Laboratory, which focuses on unobtrusive monitoring, neurobehavioral assessment, and computational modeling in support of health care, with a particular focus on chronic disease and elder care. His earlier academic appointments included positions at New York University and Stanford University. In addition to his academic career, Professor Pavel was a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories in the early 1970s, where his research included network analysis and modeling, and later at AT&T Laboratories with a focus on mobile and Internet-based technologies. He taught a number of courses in statistics for behavioral research at Stanford University and Oregon Health & Science University. He was one of the founding members of Oregon Research Center for Aging and Technology and is a member of the nascent Consortium for Technology for Proactive Care at Northeastern University. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from New York University, an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Dr. Pavel is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Brian Raymond, M.P.H., is a senior health policy consultant at the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy. Mr. Raymond analyzes emerging policy issues and supports the health policy decision-making process within Kaiser Permanente. His current areas of focus include eHealth technology to address health disparities, obesity prevention, and health in all policies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

In addition to policy analysis, Mr. Raymond manages projects and roundtable discussions to produce suggestions for health policy improvement. Mr. Raymond received a bachelor’s degree in community health administration from the University of California, Davis, and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Berkeley.

Hayley Thompson, Ph.D., M.S., is currently an associate professor in the Department of Oncology at Wayne State University School of Medicine and a Scientific Member of the Karmanos Cancer Institute, a National Cancer Institute–designated comprehensive cancer center. Dr. Thompson and several investigators in our cancer center are interested in health interventions using mobile devices/social media to reduce disparities. She was just awarded a new R01 grant (R01 HS022955), enrolling a population-based sample of approximately 1,230 African American and white breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors to assess general eHealth activity and personal health history management to develop a software application prototype to facilitate access to digital cancer survivorship resources. Dr. Thompson also leads an American Cancer Society Research Scholar grant for testing an intervention to improve posttreatment resources using eHealth technologies to provide better support for Latina breast cancer survivors in southwest Detroit.

Kimberlydawn Wisdom, M.D., M.S., is the senior vice president of Community Health & Equity and Chief Wellness and Diversity Officer at Henry Ford Health System. She is a board-certified emergency medicine physician, the chair of the Gail and Lois Warden Endowment on Multicultural Health, and Michigan’s and the nation’s first state-level surgeon general. In 2012 she was appointed by President Obama to serve on the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion and Integrative and Public Health. Since 1987 she has been on the faculty of the University of Michigan (UM) Medical School’s Department of Medical Education and adjunct professor in the UM School of Public Health. Dr. Wisdom founded the award-winning African American Initiative for Male Health Improvement (AIM–HI) and most recently, the Women Inspired Neighborhood (WIN) Network, which aims to improve access to health care and reduce infant mortality in neighborhoods in Detroit. Since 2008, she has chaired the Detroit Infant Mortality Reduction Task Force. In 2007, she founded a youth leadership development effort—Generation With Promise (GWP)—designed to equip youth to drive policy, environmental, and behavioral change in their school and community. GWP youth were featured on the cover of Modern Healthcare in June 2014. Dr. Wisdom is the recipient of numerous awards, has authored several peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

appeared on national television, including ABC’s Nightline, and has presented to audiences across the country and internationally.

Noam Ziv is a recognized thought leader, experienced system architect, and advisor to numerous startups in wireless communication and mobile health care fields, and is the founder and CEO of Kesembe Inc. Mr. Ziv is serving as a judge in both Nokia Sensing XPrize Challenge competitions, and as a technical advisor to XPrize in the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize Competition. Noam worked at Qualcomm for 23 years. His leadership roles there included overall technical and system engineering lead for Qualcomm’s cellular infrastructure development program, Technical liaison to Nortel, Alcatel, and the Electronic and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), South Korea. Mr. Ziv was vice president of engineering leading Qualcomm’s Corporate Research and Development software organization for over a decade. He made significant contributions to the design and implementation of software, hardware, systems, protocols, and custom silicon circuits (ASICs). Mr. Ziv is the inventor and architect of Qualcomm’s 2net platform, and was an active contributor to multiple key technologies and products. Mr. Ziv was also a member of the original team that invented and implemented CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) cellular communication technology. Mr. Ziv earned a bachelor of science in computer engineering at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology) and has been granted more than 20 patents.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23439.
×
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The Promises and Perils of Digital Strategies in Achieving Health Equity: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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Health care is in the midst of a dramatic transformation in the United States. Spurred by technological advances, economic imperatives, and governmental policies, information technologies are rapidly being applied to health care in an effort to improve access, enhance quality, and decrease costs. At the same time, the use of technologies by the consumers of health care is changing how people interact with the health care system and with health information.

These changes in health care have the potential both to exacerbate and to diminish the stark disparities in health and well-being that exist among population groups in the United States. If the benefits of technology flow disproportionately to those who already enjoy better coverage, use, and outcomes than disadvantaged groups, heath disparities could increase. But if technologies can be developed and implemented in such a way to improve access and enhance quality for the members of all groups, the ongoing transformation of health care could reduce the gaps among groups while improving health care for all.

To explore the potential for further insights into, and opportunities to address, disparities in underserved populations the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in October 2014. The workshop focused on (1) how communities are using digital health technologies to improve health outcomes for racial and ethnic minority populations, (2) how community engagement can improve access to high-quality health information for members of these groups, and (3) on models of successful technology-based strategies to reduce health disparities. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions at the workshop.

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