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NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
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B

Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown
Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015

This study was not chartered to review the full breadth of NASA’s 2015 technology roadmaps. Rather, its scope is limited to technologies appearing in the NASA 2015 roadmaps that were not evaluated in the 2012 NRC study. These technologies were identified by comparing (1) the Technology Area Breakdown Structure (TABS) in NASA’s 2015 roadmap, (2) the TABS in the 2012 NRC report, and (3) the TABS in NASA’s 2010 draft roadmaps, as detailed in the TABS comparison table (Table B.1).

The entries in the first column of Table B.1 denote the following:

  • New-Evaluate: These are the 39 technologies that appear in the 2015 TABS but not in the TABS in the 2012 NRC report. They are prioritized in the present report.
  • Revised-Evaluate: These three technologies appear in both the 2015 and the 2012 TABS but (1) the names of the technologies are different in the 2012 and 2015 TABS and (2) the description of related work for them in the 2015 roadmaps is substantially different from or has a much wider scope than any technology in the 2012 TABS. This report evaluates the priority of these technologies.
  • Revised-DNR: Revised-Do Not Review. The technology appears in both the 2015 and 2012 TABS, and even though the name of the technology is different in the 2012 and 2015 TABS, (1) there seems to be only a modest change in the goals and/or scope of the technology effort or (2) the scope of the technology in the 2015 roadmap is not as broad as the scope of the technology in the 2012 roadmap, and so this report does not reevaluate the priority of this technology.
  • Revived: The technology appears in the 2015 TABS but did not appear in the 2012 TABS. However, it is not evaluated as a new technology because it also appears in the 2010 TABS, meaning that the 2012 NRC study evaluated this technology and decided it should be deleted from the TABS. Given that the present study is intended to evaluate only the technologies that were not covered by the prior study, this report does not evaluate the priority for this technology.
  • Merged: The technology appears in the 2015 TABS but does not appear in the 2012 TABS. However, it is not evaluated as a new technology because it appeared in the 2010 TABS, the prior NRC study merged it with another technology in the 2010 TABS, and the merged technology appears in the 2012 TABS under a different technology number. Thus, the prior NRC study already evaluated this technology, and given that this study is intended to evaluate only those technologies not covered by the prior study, this report does not evaluate the priority of this technology.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
  • Deleted: The technology appears in the 2012 TABS but not in the 2015 TABS. Given that this study is only reviewing technologies that have been added to the 2012 TABS, this study does not evaluate the priority of this technology, nor does it review the decision to delete them.
  • Placeholder: The technology appears in the 2015 TABS, but only as a placeholder, in that NASA does not propose conducting related research in the respective roadmap. For each of these technologies there is a note in the respective roadmap such as

    —NASA is not currently advancing any technologies in this area within the time frame of this roadmap.

    —Currently, no identified mission need exists to justify NASA’s development in this technology.

    Thus, in essence, these technologies have been deleted from the TABS. Given that this study is only reviewing technologies that have been added to the 2012 TABS, this study does not evaluate the priority of these technologies, nor does it review NASA’s decision not to propose related research.

  • Elsewhere: The technology appears in the 2015 TABS, but the respective roadmap has no technical content. Rather, the roadmaps say that related research has been shifted to one or more other technologies. This study does not evaluate the priority of this technology, nor does it review NASA’s decision to shift research elsewhere or the extent to which the content of the technology in the 2012 roadmap actually appears in the designated location.
  • No entry: The technology appears in both the 2012 and 2015 TABS, so this study does not evaluate its priority.

The second column contains the TABS for July 2015 version of the TABS. This is the version of the TABS that was used to conduct this study.

The third column lists technologies from the TABS that was recommended to NASA in the 2012 NRC report. These technologies are listed out of sequence if they appear in the 2015 roadmap with a different number. (For example, see technology 7.6.2, which appears after 7.6.3.) There are some gaps in the numbering because if the committee that authored the 2012 report decided to drop a technology that was in the 2010 TABS (in the fourth column), it did not renumber subsequent technologies so that the numbering of identical technologies in the 2012 NRC TABS and the 2010 TABS would remain the same. (For example, the 2012 TABS has no technology 8.2.1.) However, in some cases the same technology has different numbers in the 2015 and 2012 roadmaps. For example, Onboard Autonomous Navigation and Maneuver is technology 5.4.2 in the 2015 roadmap and 5.4.3 in the 2012 roadmap.

The fourth column is NASA’s 2010 TABS, which is evaluated in the 2012 NRC report. That report produced a modified TABS, which appears in the third column.

Based on the comparison of the 2010, 2012, and 2015 TABS, as detailed in Table B.1, and in accordance with the study statement of task, this report evaluates the priority of 42 level 3 technologies, which are listed below.

TA 1, Launch Propulsion Systems (11 new technologies)

1.1, Solid Rocket Propulsion Systems

1.1.6, Integrated Solid Motor Systems

1.1.7, Liner and Insulation

1.6, Balloon Launch Systems

1.6.1, Super-Pressure Balloon

1.6.2, Materials

1.6.3, Pointing Systems

1.6.4, Telemetry Systems

1.6.5, Balloon Trajectory Control

1.6.6, Power Systems

1.6.7, Mechanical Systems: Launch Systems

1.6.8, Mechanical Systems: Parachute

1.6.9, Mechanical Systems: Floatation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×

TA 4, Robotics and Autonomous Systems (11 new technologies)

4.2, Mobility

4.2.5, Surface Mobility

4.2.6, Robot Navigation

4.2.7, Collaborative Mobility

4.2.8, Mobility Components

4.3, Manipulation

4.3.7, Grappling

4.4, Human–System Interaction

4.4.3, Proximate Interaction

4.4.8, Remote Interaction

4.5, System-Level Autonomy

4.5.8, Automated Data Analysis for Decision Making

4.7, Systems Engineering

4.7.3, Robot Modeling and Simulation

4.7.4, Robot Software

4.7.5, Safety and Trust

TA 5, Communications, Navigation, and Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization Systems (4 new technologies)

5.1, Optical Communications and Navigation

5.1.6, Optical Tracking

5.1.7, Integrated Photonics

5.7, Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization

5.7.1, Tracking Technologies

5.7.2, Characterization Technologies

TA 7, Human Exploration Destination Systems (1 new technology)

7.4, Habitat Systems

7.4.4, Artificial Gravity

TA 9, Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems (3 new technologies)

9.2, Descent and Targeting

9.2.6, Large Divert Guidance

9.2.7, Terrain-Relative Sensing and Characterization

9.2.8, Autonomous Targeting

TA 11, Modeling, Simulation, Information Technology, and Processing (8 new technologies)

11.2, Modeling

11.2.6, Analysis Tools for Mission Design

11.3, Simulation

11.3.5, Exascale Simulation

11.3.6, Uncertainty Quantification and Nondeterministic Simulation Methods

11.3.7, Multiscale, Multiphysics, and Multifidelity Simulation

11.3.8, Verification and Validation

11.4, Information Processing

11.4.6, Cyber Infrastructure

11.4.7, Human–System Integration

11.4.8, Cyber Security

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×

TA 13, Ground and Launch Systems (3 new technologies)

13.1, Operational Life Cycle

13.1.4, Logistics

13.2, Environmental Protection and Green Technologies

13.2.5, Curatorial Facilities, Planetary Protection, and Clean Rooms

13.3, Reliability and Maintainability

13.3.8, Decision-Making Tools

TA 14, Thermal Management Systems (1 new technology)

14.3, Thermal Protection Systems

14.3.2, TPS Modeling and Simulation

There are no new technologies in the following technology areas:

  • TA 2, In-Space Propulsion Technologies
  • TA 3, Space Power and Energy Storage
  • TA 6, Human Health, Life Support, and Habitation Systems
  • TA 8, Science Instruments, Observatories, and Sensor Systems
  • TA 10, Nanotechnology
  • TA 12, Materials, Structures, Mechanical Systems, and Manufacturing

All of the technologies in the roadmap for TA 15 Aeronautics are new, because the 2010 and 2012 TABS did not include aeronautics. As noted in Chapter 1, however, TA 15 is outside the scope of this study.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×

TABLE B.1 Technology Area Breakdown Structure Comparisons: NASA 2015/NRC 2012/NASA 2010

2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
TA 1 Launch Propulsion Systems TA 1 Launch Propulsion Systems TA 1 Launch Propulsion Systems
1.1 Solid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.1 Solid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.1 Solid Rocket Propulsion Systems
1.1.1 Propellants 1.1.1 Propellants 1.1.1 Propellants
1.1.2 Case Materials 1.1.2 Case Materials 1.1.2 Case Materials
1.1.3 Nozzle Systems 1.1.3 Nozzle Systems 1.1.3 Nozzle Systems
1.1.4 Hybrid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.1.4 Hybrid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.1.4 Hybrid Rocket Propulsion Systems
1.1.5 Fundamental Solid Propulsion Technologies 1.1.5 Fundamental Solid Propulsion Technologies 1.1.5 Fundamental Solid Propulsion Technologies
New-Evaluate 1.1.6 Integrated Solid Motor Systems
New-Evaluate 1.1.7 Liner and Insulation
1.2 Liquid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.2 Liquid Rocket Propulsion Systems 1.2 Liquid Rocket Propulsion Systems
1.2.1 LH2/LOX Based 1.2.1 LH2/LOX Based 1.2.1 LH2/LOX Based
1.2.2 RP/LOX Based 1.2.2 RP/LOX Based 1.2.2 RP/LOX Based
1.2.3 CH4/LOX Based 1.2.3 CH4/LOX Based 1.2.3 CH4/LOX Based
Placeholder 1.2.4 Detonation Wave Engines—Closed Cycle 1.2.4 Detonation Wave Engines (Closed Cycle) 1.2.4 Detonation Wave Engines (Closed Cycle)
Placeholder 1.2.5 Propellants 1.2.5 Propellants 1.2.5 Propellants
1.2.6 Fundamental Liquid Propulsion Technologies 1.2.6 Fundamental Liquid Propulsion Technologies 1.2.6 Fundamental Liquid Propulsion Technologies
1.3 Air Breathing Propulsion Systems 1.3 Air Breathing Propulsion Systems 1.3 Air Breathing Propulsion Systems
Placeholder 1.3.1 Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle 1.3.1 Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) 1.3.1 TBCC
Placeholder 1.3.2 Rocket-Based Combined Cycle 1.3.2 Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) 1.3.2 RBCC
Placeholder 1.3.3 Detonation Wave Engines—Open Cycle 1.3.3 Detonation Wave Engines (Open Cycle) 1.3.3 Detonation Wave Engines (Open Cycle)
Placeholder 1.3.4 Turbine-Based Jet Engines 1.3.4 Turbine Based Jet Engines (Flyback Boosters) 1.3.4 Turbine Based Jet Engines (Flyback Boosters)
Placeholder 1.3.5 Ramjet and Scramjet Engines 1.3.5 Ramjet/Scramjet Engines (Accelerators) 1.3.5 Ramjet/Scramjet Engines (Accelerators)
Placeholder 1.3.6 Deeply Cooled Air Cycles 1.3.6 Deeply Cooled Air Cycles 1.3.6 Deeply Cooled Air Cycles
Placeholder 1.3.7 Air Collection and Enrichment Systems 1.3.7 Air Collection and Enrichment System 1.3.7 Air Collection and Enrichment System
Placeholder 1.3.8 Fundamental Air Breathing Propulsion Technologies 1.3.8 Fundamental Air Breathing Propulsion Technologies 1.3.8 Fundamental Air Breathing Propulsion Technologies
1.4 Ancillary Propulsion Systems 1.4 Ancillary Propulsion Systems 1.4 Ancillary Propulsion Systems
1.4.1 Auxiliary Control Systems 1.4.1 Auxiliary Control Systems 1.4.1 Auxiliary Control Systems
1.4.2 Main Propulsion Systems (Excluding Engines) 1.4.2 Main Propulsion Systems (Excluding Engines) 1.4.2 Main Propulsion Systems (Excluding Engines)
1.4.3 Launch Abort Systems 1.4.3 Launch Abort Systems 1.4.3 Launch Abort Systems
1.4.4 Thrust Vector Control Systems 1.4.4 Thrust Vector Control Systems 1.4.4 Thrust Vector Control Systems
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Placeholder 1.4.5 Health Management and Sensors 1.4.5 Health Management and Sensors 1.4.5 Health Management and Sensors
1.4.6 Pyro and Separation Systems 1.4.6 Pyro and Separation Systems 1.4.6 Pyro and Separation Systems
1.4.7 Fundamental Ancillary Propulsion Technologies 1.4.7 Fundamental Ancillary Propulsion Technologies 1.4.7 Fundamental Ancillary Propulsion Technologies
1.5 Unconventional and Other Propulsion 1.5 Unconventional and Other Propulsion 1.5 Unconventional and Other Propulsion
Systems Systems Systems
Placeholder 1.5.1 Ground Launch Assist 1.5.1 Ground Launch Assist 1.5.1 Ground Launch Assist
1.5.2 Air Launch and Drop Systems 1.5.2 Air Launch/Drop Systems 1.5.2 Air Launch/Drop Systems
Elsewhere 1.5.3 Space Tether Assist 1.5.3 Space Tether Assist 1.5.3 Space Tether Assist
1.5.4 Beamed Energy and Energy Addition 1.5.4 Beamed Energy/Energy Addition 1.5.4 Beamed Energy/Energy Addition
Placeholder 1.5.5 Nuclear 1.5.5 Nuclear 1.5.5 Nuclear
Placeholder 1.5.6 High Energy Density Materials and Propellant 1.5.6 High Energy Density Materials/Propellants 1.5.6 High Energy Density Materials/Propellants
1.6 Balloon Launch Systems
New-Evaluate 1.6.1 Super-Pressure Balloon
New-Evaluate 1.6.2 Materials
New-Evaluate 1.6.3 Pointing Systems
New-Evaluate 1.6.4 Telemetry Systems
New-Evaluate 1.6.5 Balloon Trajectory Control
New-Evaluate 1.6.6 Power Systems
New-Evaluate 1.6.7 Mechanical Systems: Launch Systems
New-Evaluate 1.6.8 Mechanical Systems: Parachute
New-Evaluate 1.6.9 Mechanical Systems: Floatation
TA 2 In-Space Propulsion Technologies TA 2 In-Space Propulsion Technologies TA 2 In-Space Propulsion Technologies
2.1 Chemical Propulsion 2.1 Chemical Propulsion 2.1 Chemical Propulsion
2.1.1 Liquid Storable 2.1.1 Liquid Storable 2.1.1 Liquid Storable
2.1.2 Liquid Cryogenic 2.1.2 Liquid Cryogenic 2.1.2 Liquid Cryogenic
2.1.3 Gels 2.1.3 Gels 2.1.3 Gels
2.1.4 Solids 2.1.4 Solid 2.1.4 Solid
2.1.5 Hybrid 2.1.5 Hybrid 2.1.5 Hybrid
2.1.6 Cold Gas/Warm Gas 2.1.6 Cold Gas/Warm Gas 2.1.6 Cold Gas/Warm Gas
2.1.7 Micropropulsion 2.1.7 Micropropulsion 2.1.7 Micropropulsion
2.2 Nonchemical Propulsion 2.2 Nonchemical Propulsion 2.2 Nonchemical Propulsion
2.2.1 Electric Propulsion 2.2.1 Electric Propulsion 2.2.1 Electric Propulsion
2.2.2 Solar and Drag Sail Propulsion 2.2.2 Solar Sail Propulsion 2.2.2 Solar Sail Propulsion
2.2.3 Thermal Propulsion 2.2.3 Thermal Propulsion 2.2.3 Thermal Propulsion
2.2.4 Tether Propulsion 2.2.4 Tether Propulsion 2.2.4 Tether Propulsion
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
2.3 Advanced (TRL<3) Propulsion Technologies 2.3 Advanced (TRL <3) Propulsion Technologies 2.3 Advanced (TRL <3) Propulsion Technologies
2.3.1 Beamed Energy Propulsion 2.3.1 Beamed Energy Propulsion 2.3.1 Beamed Energy Propulsion
2.3.2 Electric Sail Propulsion 2.3.2 Electric Sail Propulsion 2.3.2 Electric Sail Propulsion
2.3.3 Fusion Propulsion 2.3.3 Fusion Propulsion 2.3.3 Fusion Propulsion
2.3.4 High-Energy-Density Materials 2.3.4 High Energy Density Materials 2.3.4 High Energy Density Materials
2.3.5 Antimatter Propulsion 2.3.5 Antimatter Propulsion 2.3.5 Antimatter Propulsion
2.3.6 Advanced Fission 2.3.6 Advanced Fission 2.3.6 Advanced Fission
2.3.7 Breakthrough Propulsion 2.3.7 Breakthrough Propulsion 2.3.7 Breakthrough Propulsion
2.4 Supporting Technologies 2.4 Supporting Technologies 2.4 Supporting Technologies
Placeholder 2.4.1 Engine Health Monitoring and Safety 2.4.1 Engine Health Monitoring and Safety
2.4.2 Propellant Storage and Transfer 2.4.2 Propellant Storage and Transfer 2.4.2 Propellant Storage and Transfer
Placeholder 2.4.3 Materials and Manufacturing Technologies 2.4.3 Materials and Manufacturing Technologies
Placeholder 2.4.4 Heat Rejection 2.4.4 Heat Rejection
Placeholder 2.4.5 Power 2.4.5 Power
TA 3 Space Power and Energy Storage TA 3 Space Power and Energy Storage TA 3 Space Power and Energy Storage
3.1 Power Generation 3.1 Power Generation 3.1 Power Generation
3.1.1 Energy Harvesting 3.1.1 Energy Harvesting 3.1.1 Energy Harvesting
3.1.2 Chemical 3.1.2 Chemical (Fuel Cells, Heat Engines) 3.1.2 Chemical (Fuel Cells, Heat Engines)
3.1.3 Solar 3.1.3 Solar (Photovoltaic and Thermal) 3.1.3 Solar (Photovoltaic and Thermal)
3.1.4 Radioisotope 3.1.4 Radioisotope 3.1.4 Radioisotope
3.1.5 Fission 3.1.5 Fission 3.1.5 Fission
3.1.6 Fusion 3.1.6 Fusion 3.1.6 Fusion
3.2 Energy Storage 3.2 Energy Storage 3.2 Energy Storage
3.2.1 Batteries 3.2.1 Batteries 3.2.1 Batteries
3.2.2 Flywheels 3.2.2 Flywheels 3.2.2 Flywheels
3.2.3 Regenerative Fuel Cells 3.2.3 Regenerative Fuel Cells 3.2.3 Regenerative Fuel Cells
Revised-DNR 3.2.4 Capacitors 3.2.4 Electric and Magnetic Field Storage
Deleted 3.2.5 Thermal Storage
3.3 Power Management and Distribution 3.3 Power Management and Distribution 3.3 Power Management and Distribution
3.3.1 Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery 3.3.1 Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) 3.3.1 FDIR
3.3.2 Management and Control 3.3.2 Management and Control 3.3.2 Management and Control
3.3.3 Distribution and Transmission 3.3.3 Distribution and Transmission 3.3.3 Distribution and Transmission
3.3.4 Wireless Power Transmission 3.3.4 Wireless Power Transmission 3.3.4 Wireless Power Transmission
3.3.5 Conversion and Regulation 3.3.5 [Power] Conversion and Regulation 3.3.5 Conversion and Regulation
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
3.4 Crosscutting Technology 3.4 CrosscuttingTechnology 3.4 Crosscutting Technology
Elsewhere 3.4.1 Analytical Tools 3.4.1 Analytical Tools 3.4.1 Analytical Tools
Elsewhere 3.4.2 Green Energy Impact 3.4.2 Green Energy Impact 3.4.2 Green Energy Impact
Elsewhere 3.4.3 Multifunctional Structures 3.4.3 Multifunctional Structures 3.4.3 Multifunctional Structures
Elsewhere 3.4.4 Alternative Fuels 3.4.4 Alternative Fuels 3.4.4 Alternative Fuels
TA 4 Robotics and Autonomous Systems TA 4 Robotics, TeleRobotics, and Autonomous Systems TA 4 Robotics, TeleRobotics and Autonomous Systems
4.1 Sensing and Perception 4.1 Sensing and Perception 4.1 Sensing and Perception
Revised-DNR 4.1.1 3D Sensing 4.1.1 Vision 4.1.1 Stereo Vision
Revised-DNR 4.1.2 State Estimation 4.1.5 Pose Estimation 4.1.2 LIDAR
Revised-DNR 4.1.3 Onboard Mapping 4.1.4 Localization and Mapping 4.1.3 Proximity Sensing
Revised-DNR 4.1.4 Object, Event, and Activity Recognition 4.1.3 Natural Feature Image Recognition 4.1.4 Sensing Non-Geometric Terrain Properties
Revised-DNR 4.1.5 Force and Tactile Sensing 4.1.2 Tactile Sensing 4.1.6 Tactile Sensing Arrays
Elsewhere 4.1.6 Onboard Science Data Analysis 4.1.6 Multi-Sensor Data Fusion
Deleted 4.1.7 Mobile Feature Tracking and Discrimination
Deleted 4.1.8 Terrain Classification and Characterization 4.1.5 Estimating Terrain Mechanical Properties
4.1.7 Gravity Sensors and Celestial Nav.
4.1.8 Terrain-Relative Navigation
4.1.9 Real-Time Self-Calibrating of Hand-Eye Systems
4.2 Mobility 4.2 Mobility 4.2 Mobility
4.2.1 Extreme Terrain Mobility 4.2.1 Extreme Terrain Mobility
4.2.2 Below-Surface Mobility 4.2.2 Below-Surface Mobility
4.2.3 Above-Surface Mobility 4.2.3 Above-Surface Mobility
4.2.4 Small-Body and Microgravity Mobility 4.2.4 Small Body/Microgravity Mobility
New-Evaluate 4.2.5 Surface Mobility
New-Evaluate 4.2.6 Robot Navigation
New-Evaluate 4.2.7 Collaborative Mobility
New-Evaluate 4.2.8 Mobility Components
4.2.1 Simultaneous Localize and Mapping
4.2.2 Hazard Detection Algorithms
4.2.3 Active Illumination
4.2.4 3-D Path Planning w/ Uncertainty
4.2.5 Long-life Extreme Enviro. Mechanisms
4.2.6 Robotic Jet Backpacks
4.2.7 Smart Tethers
4.2.8 Robot Swarms
4.2.9 Walking in Microgravity
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
4.3 Manipulation 4.3 Manipulation 4.3 Manipulation
Revised-DNR 4.3.1 Manipulator Components 4.3.1 Robot Arms 4.3.3 Robot Arms (light, high strength)
4.3.2 Dexterous Manipulation 4.3.2 Dexterous Manipulators
Elsewhere 4.3.3 Modeling of Contact Dynamics 4.3.3 Modeling of Contact Dynamics
4.3.4 Mobile Manipulation 4.3.4 Mobile Manipulation
4.3.5 Collaborative Manipulation 4.3.5 Collaborative Manipulation
Revised-DNR 4.3.6 Sample Acquisition and Handling 4.3.6 Robotic Drilling and Sample Processing
New-Evaluate 4.3.7 Grappling 4.3.1 Motion Planning Alg., High DOF
4.3.2 Sensing and Control
4.3.4 Dexterous Manipul., Robot Hands
4.3.5 Sensor Fusion for Grasping
4.3.6 Grasp Planning Algorithms Robotic Drilling Mechanisms
4.3.7 Multiarm/Finger Manipulation
4.3.8 Planning with Uncertainty
4.4 Human–Systems Interaction 4.4 Human–Systems Integration 4.4 Human–Systems Integration
Revised-DNR 4.4.1 Multimodal Interaction 4.4.1 Multimodal Human–Systems Interaction
Elsewhere 4.4.2 Supervisory Control 4.4.2 Supervisory Control
Revised-Evaluate 4.4.3 Proximate Interaction 4.4.3 Robot-to-Suit Interfaces
Elsewhere 4.4.4 Intent Recognition and Reaction 4.4.4 Intent Recognition and Reaction
4.4.5 Distributed Collaboration and Coordination 4.4.5 Distributed Collaboration 4.4.3 Distributed Collaboration
Elsewhere 4.4.6 Common and Standard Human System 4.4.6 Common Human–Systems Interfaces
Interfaces
Elsewhere 4.4.7 Safety, Trust, and Interfacing of Robotic and Human Proximity Operations 4.4.7 Safety, Trust, and Interfacing of Robotic/Human Proximity Operations
New-Evaluate 4.4.8 Remote Interaction
4.4.1 Crew Decision Support Systems
4.4.2 Immersive Visualization
4.4.4 Multiagent Coordination
4.4.5 Haptic Displays
4.4.6 Displaying Range Data to Humans
4.5 System-Level Autonomy 4.5 Autonomy 4.5 Autonomy
Revised-DNR 4.5.1 System Health Management 4.5.1 Vehicle System Management and FDIR 4.5.2 Vehicle Health, Prognostic/Diagnostic Systems
4.5.6 Integrated Systems Health Management
4.5.7 FDIR and Diagnosis
4.5.8 System Monitoring and Prognosis
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
4.5.2 Activity Planning, Scheduling, and Execution 4.5.2 Dynamic Planning and Sequencing Tools 4.5.4 Planning/Scheduling Resources
Elsewhere 4.5.3 Autonomous Guidance and Control 4.5.3 Autonomous Guidance and Control
4.5.4 Multiagent Coordination 4.5.4 Multiagent Coordination
Elsewhere 4.5.5 Adjustable Autonomy 4.5.5 Adjustable Autonomy
Elsewhere 4.5.6 Terrain-Relative Navigation 4.5.6 Terrain-Relative Navigation
Elsewhere 4.5.7 Path and Motion Planning with Uncertainty 4.5.7 Path and Motion Planning with Uncertainty
New-Evaluate 4.5.8 Automated Data Analysis for Decision Making
4.5.1 Spacecraft Control Systems
4.5.3 Human Life Support Systems
4.5.5 Operations
4.5.9 V&V of Complex Adaptive Systems
4.5.10 Automated Software Generation
4.5.11 Software Reliability
4.5.12 Semiautomatic Systems
4.6 Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking 4.6 Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking 4.6 Auton. Rendezvous and Docking
4.6.1 Relative Navigation Sensors 4.6.1 Relative Navigation Sensors (long, mid, and near range) 4.6.3 Relative Navigation Sensors
Revised-DNR 4.6.2 GN&C Algorithms 4.6.2 Relative Guidance Algorithms
4.6.3 Docking and Capture Mechanisms and Interfaces 4.6.3 Docking and Capture Mechanisms/Interfaces 4.6.2 Low Impact and Androgynous Docking Systems and Interfaces
Elsewhere 4.6.4 Mission and System Managers for Autonomy and Automation
4.6.1 Rendezvous and Capture
4.6.4 Robust AR&D GN&C Algorithms and FSW
4.6.5 Onboard Mission Manager
4.6.6 AR&D Integration and Standardization
4.7 Systems Engineering 4.7 RTA Systems Engineering 4.7 RTA Systems Engineering
4.7.1 Modularity, Commonality, and Interfaces 4.7.1 Modularity/Commonality
4.7.2 Verification and Validation of Complex Adaptive Systems 4.7.2 Verification and Validation of Complex Adaptive Systems
Revised-Evaluate 4.7.3 Robot Modeling and Simulation 4.7.3 Onboard Computing
New-Evaluate 4.7.4 Robot Software
New-Evaluate 4.7.5 Safety and Trust
4.7.1 Human Safety
4.7.2 Refueling Interfaces and Assoc. Tools
4.7.3 Modular/Serviceable Interfaces
4.7.4 High Perf., Low-Power Onboard Computers
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
4.7.5 Environment Tolerance
4.7.6 Thermal Control
4.7.7 Robot-to-Suit Interfaces
4.7.8 Common Human-Robot Interfaces
4.7.9 Crew Self-Sufficiency
TA 5 Communications, Navigation, and Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization Systems TA 5 Communications and Navigation TA 5 Communications and Navigation
5.1 Optical Communications and Navigation 5.1 Optical Communications and Navigation 5.1 Optical Communications and Navigation
5.1.1 Detector Development 5.1.1 Detector Development 5.1.1 Detector Development
5.1.2 Large Apertures 5.1.2 Large Apertures 5.1.2 Large Apertures
5.1.3 Lasers 5.1.3 Lasers 5.1.3 Lasers
5.1.4 Acquisition and Tracking 5.1.4 Acquisition and Tracking 5.1.4 Acquisition and Tracking
5.1.5 Atmospheric Mitigation 5.1.5 Atmospheric Mitigation 5.1.5 Atmospheric Mitigation
New-Evaluate 5.1.6 Optical Tracking
New-Evaluate 5.1.7 Integrated Photonics
5.2 Radio Frequency Communications 5.2 Radio Frequency Communications 5.2 Radio Frequency Communications
5.2.1 Spectrum-Efficient Technologies 5.2.1 Spectrum Efficient Technologies 5.2.1 Spectrum Efficient Technologies
5.2.2 Power-Efficient Technologies 5.2.2 Power-Efficient Technologies 5.2.2 Power-Efficient Technologies
5.2.3 Propagation 5.2.3 Propagation 5.2.3 Propagation
Elsewhere 5.2.4 Flight and Ground Systems 5.2.4 Flight and Ground Systems 5.2.4 Flight and Ground Systems
5.2.5 Earth Launch and Reentry Communications 5.2.5 Earth Launch and Reentry Communication 5.2.5 Earth Launch and Reentry Comm.
5.2.6 Antennas 5.2.6 Antennas 5.2.6 Antennas
5.3 Internetworking 5.3 Internetworking 5.3 Internetworking
5.3.1 Disruption-Tolerant Networking 5.3.1 Disruptive Tolerant Networking 5.3.1 Disruptive Tolerant Networking
5.3.2 Adaptive Network Topology 5.3.2 Adaptive Network Topology 5.3.2 Adaptive Network Topology
Placeholder 5.3.3 Information Assurance 5.3.3 Information Assurance 5.3.3 Information Assurance
Placeholder 5.3.4 Integrated Network Management 5.3.4 Integrated Network Management 5.3.4 Integrated Network Management
5.4 Position, Navigation, and Timing 5.4 Position, Navigation, and Timing 5.4 Position, Navigation, and Timing
5.4.1 Timekeeping and Time Distribution 5.4.1 Timekeeping and Time Distribution 5.4.1 Timekeeping
5.4.2 Time Distribution
5.4.3 Onboard Autonomous Navigation and Maneuver 5.4.3 Onboard Autonomous Navigation and Maneuver 5.4.3 Onboard Autonomous Navigation and Maneuver
5.4.3 Sensors and Vision Processing Systems 5.4.4 Sensors and Vision Processing Systems 5.4.4 Sensors and Vision Processing Systems
5.4.4 Relative and Proximity Navigation 5.4.5 Relative and Proximity Navigation 5.4.5 Relative and Proximity Navigation
5.4.5 Auto Precision Formation Flying 5.4.6 Auto Precision Formation Flying 5.4.6 Auto Precision Formation Flying
5.4.6 Autonomous Approach and Landing 5.4.7 Auto Approach and Landing 5.4.7 Auto Approach and Landing
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
5.5 Integrated Technologies 5.5 Integrated Technologies 5.5 Integrated Technologies
5.5.1 Radio Systems 5.5.1 Radio Systems 5.5.1 Radio Systems
5.5.2 Ultra Wideband 5.5.2 Ultra Wideband 5.5.2 Ultra Wideband
5.5.3 Cognitive Networks 5.5.3 Cognitive Networks 5.5.3 Cognitive Networks
Elsewhere 5.5.4 Science from the Communications System 5.5.4 Science from the Communication System 5.5.4 Science from the Comm System
Elsewhere 5.5.5 Hybrid Optical Communications and Navigation Sensors 5.5.5 Hybrid Optical Communications and Navigation Sensors 5.5.5 Hybrid Optical Comm and Nav Sensors
5.5.6 Radio Frequency and Optical Hybrid Technology 5.5.6 RF and Optical Hybrid Technology 5.5.6 RF and Optical Hybrid Technology
5.6 Revolutionary Concepts 5.6 Revolutionary Concepts 5.6 Revolutionary Concepts
5.6.1 X-Ray Navigation 5.6.1 X-Ray Navigation 5.6.1 X-Ray Navigation
5.6.2 X-Ray Communications 5.6.2 X-Ray Communications 5.6.2 X-Ray Communications
5.6.3 Neutrino-Based Navigation and Tracking 5.6.3 Neutrino-Based Navigation and Tracking 5.6.3 Neutrino-Based Navigation and Tracking
5.6.4 Quantum Key Distribution 5.6.4 Quantum Key Distribution 5.6.4 Quantum Key Distribution
5.6.5 Quantum Communications 5.6.5 Quantum Communications 5.6.5 Quantum Communications
5.6.6 Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter Microwave Amplifier 5.6.6 SQIF Microwave Amplifier 5.6.6 SQIF Microwave Amplifier
5.6.7 Reconfigurable Large Apertures 5.6.7 Reconfigurable Large Apertures Using Nanosat Constellations 5.6.7 Reconfigurable Large Apertures
5.7 Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization
New-Evaluate 5.7.1 Tracking Technologies
New-Evaluate 5.7.2 Characterization Technologies
TA 6 Human Health, Life Support, and Habitation Systems TA 6 Human Health, Life Support, and Habitation Systems TA 6 Human Health, Life Support and Habitation Systems
6.1 Environmental Control and Life Support Systems and Habitation Systems 6.1 Environmental Control, Life Support Systems, and Habitation Systems 6.1 Environmental Control, Life Support Systems, and Habitation Systems
6.1.1 Air Revitalization 6.1.1 Air Revitalization 6.1.1 Air Revitalization
6.1.2 Water Recovery and Management 6.1.2 Water Recovery and Management 6.1.2 Water Recovery and Management
6.1.3 Waste Management 6.1.3 Waste Management 6.1.3 Waste Management
6.1.4 Habitation 6.1.4 Habitation 6.1.4 Habitation
6.2 Extravehicular Activity Systems 6.2 Extravehicular Activity Systems 6.2 Extravehicular Activity Systems
6.2.1 Pressure Garment 6.2.1 Pressure Garment 6.2.1 Pressure Garment
6.2.2 Portable Life Support System 6.2.2 Portable Life Support System 6.2.2 Portable Life Support System
6.2.3 Power, Avionics, and Software 6.2.3 Power, Avionics, and Software 6.2.3 Power, Avionics and Software
6.3 Human Health and Performance 6.3 Human Health and Performance 6.3 Human Health and Performance
6.3.1 Medical Diagnosis and Prognosis 6.3.1 Medical Diagnosis/Prognosis 6.3.1 Medical Diagnosis/Prognosis
6.3.2 Long-Duration Health 6.3.2 Long-Duration Health 6.3.2 Long-Duration Health
6.3.3 Behavioral Health 6.3.3 Behavioral Health and Performance 6.3.3 Behavioral Health and Performance
6.3.4 Human Factors 6.3.4 Human Factors and Performance 6.3.4 Human Factors and Performance
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
6.4 Environmental Monitoring, Safety, and Emergency Response 6.4 Environmental Monitoring, Safety, and Emergency Response 6.4 Environmental Monitoring, Safety and Emergency Response
6.4.1 Sensors: Air, Water, Microbial, and Acoustic 6.4.1 Sensors: Air, Water, Microbial, etc. 6.4.1 Sensors: Air, Water, Microbial, etc.
Revised-DNR 6.4.2 Fire: Detection, Suppression, and Recovery 6.4.2 Fire: Detection, Suppression 6.4.2 Fire: Detection, Suppression
6.4.3 Protective Clothing and Breathing 6.4.3 Protective Clothing/Breathing 6.4.3 Protective Clothing/Breathing
6.4.4 Remediation 6.4.4 Remediation 6.4.4 Remediation
6.5 Radiation 6.5 Radiation 6.5 Radiation
6.5.1 Risk Assessment Modeling 6.5.1 Risk Assessment Modeling 6.5.1 Risk Assessment Modeling
6.5.2 Radiation Mitigation and Biological Countermeasures 6.5.2 Radiation Mitigation 6.5.2 Radiation Mitigation
6.5.3 Protection Systems 6.5.3 Protection Systems 6.5.3 Protection Systems
6.5.4 Space Weather Prediction 6.5.4 Radiation Prediction 6.5.4 Space Weather Prediction
6.5.5 Monitoring Technology 6.5.5 Monitoring Technology 6.5.5 Monitoring Technology
TA 7 Human Exploration Destination Systems TA 7 Human Exploration Destination Systems TA 7 Human Exploration Destination Systems
7.1 In Situ Resource Utilization 7.1 In Situ Resource Utilization 7.1 In Situ Resource Utilization
7.1.1 Destination Reconnaissance, Prospecting, and Mapping 7.1.1 Destination Reconnaissance, Prospecting, and Mapping 7.1.1 Destination Reconnaissance, Prospecting, and Mapping
7.1.2 Resource Acquisition 7.1.2 Resource Acquisition 7.1.1.1 Resource Acquisition
7.1.3 Processing and Production 7.1.3 ISRU Products/Production 7.1.2 Consumables Production
7.1.4 Manufacturing Products and Infrastructure Emplacement 7.1.4 Manufacturing and Infrastructure Emplacement 7.1.3 Manufacturing and Infrastructure Emplacement
7.2 Sustainability and Supportability 7.2 Sustainability and Supportability 7.2 Sustainability and Supportability
7.2.1 Autonomous Logistics Management 7.2.1 Autonomous Logistics Management 7.2.1 Logistics Systems
7.2.2 Maintenance Systems 7.2.2 Maintenance Systems 7.2.2 Maintenance Systems
7.2.3 Repair Systems 7.2.3 Repair Systems 7.2.3 Repair Systems
7.2.4 Food Production, Processing, and Preservation 7.2.4 Food Production, Processing, and Preservation
7.3 Human Mobility Systems 7.3 Advanced Human Mobility Systems 7.3 Advanced Human Mobility Systems
7.3.1 EVA Mobility 7.3.1 EVA Mobility 7.3.1 EVA Mobility
7.3.2 Surface Mobility 7.3.2 Surface Mobility 7.3.2 Surface Mobility
7.3.3 Off-Surface Mobility 7.3.3 Off-Surface Mobility 7.3.3 Off-Surface Mobility
7.4 Habitat Systems 7.4 Advanced Habitat Systems 7.4 Advanced Habitat Systems
7.4.1 Integrated Habitat Systems 7.4.1 Integrated Habitat Systems 7.4.1 Integrated Habitat Systems
7.4.2 Habitat Evolution 7.4.2 Habitat Evolution 7.4.2 Habitat Evolution
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
7.4.3 Smart Habitats 7.4.3 Smart Habitats
New-Evaluate 7.4.4 Artificial Gravity
7.5 Mission Operations and Safety 7.5 Mission Operations and Safety 7.5 Mission Operations and Safety
Elsewhere 7.5.1 Crew Training 7.5.1 Crew Training 7.5.1 Crew Training
7.5.2 Environmental Protection
Revived 7.5.2 Planetary Protection 7.5.4 Planetary Safety
7.5.3 Integrated Flight Operations Systems 7.5.5 Integrated Flight Operations Systems
Elsewhere 7.5.4 Integrated Risk Assessment Tools 7.5.6 Integrated Risk Assessment Tools
7.5.3 Remote Mission Operations
7.6 Crosscutting Systems 7.6 Crosscutting Systems 7.6 Crosscutting Systems
7.6.1 Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation 7.6.3 Dust Prevention and Mitigation 7.6.3 Dust Prevention and Mitigation
7.6.2 Construction and Assembly 7.6.2 Construction and Assembly 7.6.2 Construction and Assembly
7.6.1 Modeling, Simulations and Destination Characterization
TA 8 Science Instruments, Observatories, and Sensor Systems TA 8 Science Instruments, Observatories, and Sensor Systems TA 8 Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems
8.1 Remote Sensing Instruments and Sensors 8.1 Remote Sensing Instruments/Sensors 8.1 Remote Sensing Instruments/Sensors
8.1.1 Detectors and Focal Planes 8.1.1 Detectors and Focal Planes 8.1.1 Detectors and Focal Planes
8.1.2 Electronics 8.1.2 Electronics 8.1.2 Electronics
8.1.3 Optical Components 8.1.3 Optical Systems 8.1.3 Optical Components
8.1.4 Microwave, Millimeter-, and Submillimeter-Waves 8.1.4 Microwave/Radio 8.1.4 Microwave/Radio
8.1.5 Lasers 8.1.5 Lasers 8.1.5 Lasers
8.1.6 Cryogenic/Thermal 8.1.6 Cryogenic/Thermal 8.1.6 Cryogenic/Thermal
8.1.7 Space Atomic Interferometry
Deleted 8.2 Observatories 8.2 Observatories 8.2 Observatories
Merged 8.2.1 Mirror Systems 8.2.1 Mirror Systems
8.2.2 Structures and Antennas 8.2.2 Structures and Antennas 8.2.2 Structures and Antennas
8.2.3 Distributed Aperture 8.2.3 Distributed Aperture 8.2.3 Distributed Aperture
Deleted 8.2.4 High Contrast Imaging and Spectroscopy Technologies
Deleted 8.2.5 Wireless Spacecraft Technologies
8.3 In Situ Instruments and Sensors 8.3 In Situ Instruments and Sensors 8.3 In Situ Instruments and Sensors
8.3.1 Field and Particle Detectors 8.3.1 Particles, Fields, and Waves: Charged and 8.3.1 Particles: Charged and Neutral
Elsewhere 8.3.2 Fields and Waves Neutral Particles, Magnetic and Electric Fields 8.3.2 Fields and Waves
8.3.3 In Situ (other) 8.3.3 In Situ (Instruments and Sensors) 8.3.3 In Situ
8.3.4 Surface Biology and Chemistry Sensors: Sensors to Detect and Analyze Biotic and Prebiotic Substances
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
TA 9 Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems TA 9 Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems TA 9 Entry, Descent and Landing Systems
9.1 Aeroassist and Atmospheric Entry 9.1 Aeroassist and Atmospheric Entry 9.1 Aeroassist and Atmospheric Entry
9.1.1 Thermal Protection Systems for Rigid Decelerators 9.1.1 Rigid Thermal Protection Systems 9.1.1 Rigid Thermal Protection Systems
9.1.2 Thermal Protection Systems for Deployable Decelerators 9.1.2 Flexible Thermal Protection Systems 9.1.2 Flexible Thermal Protection Systems
9.1.3 Rigid Hypersonic Decelerators 9.1.3 Rigid Hypersonic Decelerators 9.1.3 Rigid Hypersonic Decelerators
9.1.4 Deployable Hypersonic Decelerators 9.1.4 Deployable Hypersonic Decelerators 9.1.4 Deployable Hypersonic Decelerators
Elsewhere 9.1.5 Instrumentation and Health Monitoring 9.1.5 Instrumentation and Health Monitoring
Elsewhere 9.1.6 Entry Modeling and Simulation 9.1.6 Entry Modeling and Simulation
9.2 Descent and Targeting 9.2 Descent 9.2 Descent
9.2.1 Attached Deployable Decelerators 9.2.1 Attached Deployable Decelerators 9.2.1 Attached Deployable Decelerators
9.2.2 Trailing Deployable Decelerators 9.2.2 Trailing Deployable Decelerators 9.2.2 Trailing Deployable Decelerators
9.2.3 Supersonic Retropropulsion 9.2.3 Supersonic Retropropulsion 9.2.3 Supersonic Retropropulsion
Elsewhere 9.2.4 GN&C Sensors 9.2.4 GN&C Sensors
Elsewhere 9.2.5 Descent Modeling and Simulation 9.2.5 Descent Modeling and Simulation
New-Evaluate 9.2.6 Large Divert Guidance
New-Evaluate 9.2.7 Terrain-Relative Sensing and Characterization
New-Evaluate 9.2.8 Autonomous Targeting
9.3 Landing 9.3 Landing 9.3 Landing
Revised-DNR 9.3.1 Propulsion and Touchdown Systems 9.3.1 Touchdown Systems 9.3.1 Touchdown Systems
Elsewhere 9.3.2 Egress and Deployment Systems 9.3.2 Egress and Deployment Systems 9.3.2 Egress and Deployment Systems
Elsewhere 9.3.3 Propulsion Systems 9.3.3 Propulsion Systems 9.3.3 Propulsion Systems
Elsewhere 9.3.4 Large-Body GN&C 9.3.4 Large-Body GN&C
Elsewhere 9.3.5 Small-Body Systems 9.3.5 Small-Body Systems 9.3.5 Small-Body Systems
Elsewhere 9.3.6 Landing Modeling and Simulation 9.3.6 Landing Modeling and Simulation
9.4 Vehicle Systems 9.4 Vehicle Systems Technology 9.4 Vehicle Systems Technology
Elsewhere 9.4.1 Architecture Analysis 9.4.1 Architecture Analyses
Elsewhere 9.4.2 Separation Systems 9.4.2 Separation Systems 9.4.2 Separation Systems
Elsewhere 9.4.3 System Integration and Analysis 9.4.3 System Integration and Analyses 9.4.3 System Integration and Analyses
Elsewhere 9.4.4 Atmosphere and Surface Characterization 9.4.4 Atmosphere and Surface Characterization 9.4.4 Atmosphere and Surface Characterization
9.4.5 Modeling and Simulation 9.4.5 EDL Modeling and Simulation
9.4.6 Instrumentation and Health Monitoring 9.4.6 Instrumentation and Health Monitoring
Elsewhere 9.4.7 GN&C Sensors and Systems 9.4.7 GN&C Sensors and Systems
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
TA 10 Nanotechnology TA 10 Nanotechnology TA 10 Nanotechnology
10.1 Engineered Materials and Structures 10.1 Engineered Materials and Structures 10.1 Engineered Materials and Structures
Revised-DNR 10.1.1 Lightweight Structures 10.1.1 Lightweight Materials and Structures 10.1.1 Lightweight Structures
10.1.2 Damage-Tolerant Systems 10.1.2 Damage Tolerant Systems 10.1.2 Damage Tolerant Systems
10.1.3 Coatings 10.1.3 Coatings 10.1.3 Coatings
10.1.4 Adhesives 10.1.4 Adhesives 10.1.4 Adhesives
10.1.5 Thermal Protection and Control 10.1.5 Thermal Protection and Control 10.1.5 Thermal Protection and Control
10.2 Energy Storage, Power Generation, and Power Distribution 10.2 Energy Generation and Storage 10.2 Energy Generation and Storage
10.2.1 Energy Storage 10.2.2 Energy Storage 10.2.1 Energy Storage
10.2.2 Power Generation 10.2.1 Energy Generation 10.2.2 Energy Generation
10.2.3 Power Distribution 10.2.3 Energy Distribution 10.2.3 Energy Distribution
10.3 Propulsion 10.3 Propulsion 10.3 Propulsion
10.3.1 Propellants 10.3.1 Nanopropellants 10.3.1 Propellants
10.3.2 Propulsion Components 10.3.2 Propulsion Systems 10.3.2 Propulsion Components
10.3.3 In-Space Propulsion 10.3.3 In-Space Propulsion 10.3.3 In-Space Propulsion
10.4 Sensors, Electronics, and Devices 10.4 Sensors, Electronics, and Devices 10.4 Sensors, Electronics, and Devices
10.4.1 Sensors and Actuators 10.4.1 Sensors and Actuators 10.4.1 Sensors and Actuators
10.4.2 Nanoelectronics 10.4.2 Electronics 10.4.2 Nanoelectronics
10.4.3 Miniature Instruments and Instrument Components 10.4.3 Miniature Instrumentation 10.4.3 Miniature Instruments
TA 11 Modeling, Simulation, Information Technology, and Processing TA 11 Modeling, Simulation, and Information Technology, and Processing TA 11 Modeling, Simulation, Information Technology, and Processing
11.1 Computing 11.1 Computing 11.1 Computing
11.1.1 Flight Computing 11.1.1 Flight Computing 11.1.1 Flight Computing
11.1.2 Ground Computing 11.1.2 Ground Computing 11.1.2 Ground Computing
11.2 Modeling 11.2 Modeling 11.2 Modeling
11.2.1 Software Modeling and Model Checking 11.2.1 Software Modeling and Model-Checking 11.2.1 Software Modeling and Model-Checking
11.2.2 Integrated Hardware and Software Modeling 11.2.2 Integrated Hardware and Software Modeling 11.2.2 Integrated Hardware and Software Modeling
11.2.3 Human–System Performance Modeling 11.2.3 Human–System Performance Modeling 11.2.3 Human–System Performance Modeling
11.2.4 Science Modeling 11.2.4a Science Modeling and Simulation 11.2.4 Science and Engineering Modeling
Deleted 11.2.4b Aerospace Engineering Modeling and Simulation
11.2.5 Frameworks, Languages, Tools, and Standards 11.2.5 Frameworks, Languages, Tools, and Standards 11.2.5 Frameworks, Languages, Tools and Standards
New-Evaluate 11.2.6 Analysis Tools for Mission Design
11.3 Simulation 11.3 Simulation 11.3 Simulation
11.3.1 Distributed Simulation 11.3.1 Distributed Simulation 11.3.1 Distributed Simulation
11.3.2 Integrated System Life-Cycle Simulation 11.3.2 Integrated System Life-Cycle Simulation 11.3.2 Integrated System Life-Cycle Simulation
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
11.3.3 Simulation-Based Systems Engineering 11.3.3 Simulation-Based Systems Engineering 11.3.3 Simulation-Based Systems Engineering
11.3.4 Simulation-Based Training and Decision Support Systems 11.3.4 Simulation-Based Training and Decision Support Systems 11.3.4 Simulation-Based Training and Decision Support Systems
New-Evaluate 11.3.5 Exascale Simulation
New-Evaluate 11.3.6 Uncertainty Quantification and Nondeterministic Simulation Methods
New-Evaluate 11.3.7 Multiscale, Multiphysics, and Multifidelity Simulation
New-Evaluate 11.3.8 Verification and Validation
11.4 Information Processing 11.4 Information Processing 11.4 Information Processing
11.4.1 Science, Engineering, and Mission Data Life Cycle 11.4.1 Science, Engineering, and Mission Data Life Cycle 11.4.1 Science, Engineering and Mission Data Life Cycle
11.4.2 Intelligent Data Understanding 11.4.2 Intelligent Data Understanding 11.4.2 Intelligent Data Understanding
11.4.3 Semantic Technologies 11.4.3 Semantic Technologies 11.4.3 Semantic Technologies
11.4.4 Collaborative Science and Engineering 11.4.4 Collaborative Science and Engineering 11.4.4 Collaborative Science and Engineering
11.4.5 Advanced Mission Systems 11.4.5 Advanced Mission Systems 11.4.5 Advanced Mission Systems
New-Evaluate 11.4.6 Cyber Infrastructure
New-Evaluate 11.4.7 Human–System Integration
New-Evaluate 11.4.8 Cyber Security
TA 12 Materials, Structures, Mechanical Systems, and Manufacturing TA 12 Materials, Structures, Mechanical Systems, and Manufacturing TA 12 Materials, Structures, Mechanical Systems, and Manufacturing
12.1 Materials 12.1 Materials 12.1 Materials
12.1.1 Lightweight Structural Materials 12.1.1 Lightweight Structure 12.1.1 Lightweight Structure
12.1.2 Computationally Designed Materials 12.1.2 Computational Design 12.1.2 Computational Design
12.1.3 Flexible Material Systems 12.1.3 Flexible Material Systems 12.1.3 Flexible Material Systems
12.1.4 Materials for Extreme Environments 12.1.4 Environment 12.1.4 Environment
12.1.5 Special Materials 12.1.5 Special Materials 12.1.5 Special Materials
12.2 Structures 12.2 Structures 12.2 Structures
12.2.1 Lightweight Concepts 12.2.1 Lightweight Concepts 12.2.1 Lightweight Concepts
12.2.2 Design and Certification Methods 12.2.2 Design and Certification Methods 12.2.2 Design and Certification Methods
12.2.3 Reliability and Sustainment 12.2.3 Reliability and Sustainment 12.2.3 Reliability and Sustainment
12.2.4 Test Tools and Methods 12.2.4 Test Tools and Methods 12.2.4 Test Tools and Methods
12.2.5 Innovative, Multifunctional Concepts 12.2.5 Innovative, Multifunctional Concepts 12.2.5 Innovative, Multifunctional Concepts
12.2.6 Loads and Environments See 12.5.3 See 12.5.3
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
12.3 Mechanical Systems 12.3 Mechanical Systems 12.3 Mechanical Systems
12.3.1 Deployables, Docking, and Interfaces 12.3.1 Deployables, Docking, and Interfaces 12.3.1 Deployables, Docking and Interfaces
12.3.2 Mechanism Life Extension Systems 12.3.2 Mechanism Life Extension Systems 12.3.2 Mechanism Life Extension Systems
12.3.3 Electromechanical, Mechanical, and Micromechanisms 12.3.3 Electromechanical, Mechanical, and Micromechanisms 12.3.3 Electromechanical, Mechanical and Micromechanisms
12.3.4 Design and Analysis Tools and Methods 12.3.4 Design and Analysis Tools and Methods 12.3.4 Design and Analysis Tools and Methods
12.3.5 Reliability, Life Assessment, and Health Monitoring 12.3.5 Reliability/Life Assessment/Health Monitoring 12.3.5 Reliability/Life Assessment/Health Monitoring
12.3.6 Certification Methods 12.3.6 Certification Methods 12.3.6 Certification Methods
12.4 Manufacturing 12.4 Manufacturing 12.4 Manufacturing
12.4.1 Manufacturing Processes 12.4.1 Manufacturing Processes 12.4.1 Manufacturing Processes
12.4.2 Intelligent Integrated Manufacturing and Cyber Physical Systems 12.4.2 Intelligent Integrated Manufacturing and Cyber Physical Systems 12.4.2 Intelligent Integrated Manufacturing and Cyber Physical Systems
12.4.3 Electronics and Optics Manufacturing Process 12.4.3 Electronics and Optics Manufacturing Process 12.4.3 Electronics and Optics Manufacturing Process
12.4.4 Sustainable Manufacturing 12.4.4 Sustainable Manufacturing 12.4.4 Sustainable Manufacturing
12.4.5 Nondestructive Evaluation and Sensors See 12.5.1 See 12.5.1
12.5 Crosscutting 12.5 Crosscutting 12.5 Crosscutting
12.5.1 Renumbered as 12.4.5 12.5.1 Nondestructive Evaluation and Sensors 12.5.1 Nondestructive Evaluation and Sensors
Deleted 12.5.2 Model-Based Certification and Sustainment Methods 12.5.2 Model-Based Certification and Sustainment Methods
12.5.3 Renumbered as 12.2.6 12.5.3 Loads and Environments 12.5.3 Loads and Environments
TA 13 Ground and Launch Systems TA 13 Ground and Launch Systems Processing TA 13 Ground and Launch Systems Processing
13.1 Operational Life Cycle 13.1 Technologies to Optimize the Operational Life Cycle 13.1 Technologies to Optimize the Operational Life Cycle
13.1.1 On-Site Production, Storage, Distribution, and Conservation of Fluids 13.1.1 Storage, Distribution, and Conservation of Fluids 13.1.1 Storage, Distribution and Conservation of Fluids
13.1.2 Automated Alignment, Coupling, Assembly, and Transportation Systems 13.1.2 Automated Alignment, Coupling, and Assembly Systems 13.1.2 Automated Alignment, Coupling, and Assembly Systems
13.1.3 Autonomous Command and Control for Integrated Vehicle and Ground Systems 13.1.3 Autonomous Command and Control for Ground and Integrated Vehicle/Ground Systems 13.1.3 Autonomous Command and Control for Ground and Integrated Vehicle/Ground Systems
New-Evaluate 13.1.4 Logistics
13.2 Environmental Protection and Green Technologies 13.2 Environmental and Green Technologies 13.2 Environmental and Green Technologies
13.2.1 Corrosion Prevention, Detection, and Mitigation 13.2.1 Corrosion Prevention, Detection, and Mitigation 13.2.1 Corrosion Prevention, Detection, and Mitigation
13.2.2 Environmental Remediation and Site Restoration 13.2.2 Environmental Remediation and Site Restoration 13.2.2 Environmental Remediation and Site Restoration
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
2015 vs 2012 Comparison TABS: NASA July 2015 Draft TABS: 2012 NRC Report TABS: NASA 2010 Draft (rev 10)
13.2.3 Preservation of Natural Ecosystems 13.2.3 Preservation of Natural Ecosystems 13.2.3 Preservation of Natural Ecosystems
13.2.4 Alternate Energy Prototypes 13.2.4 Alternate Energy Prototypes 13.2.4 Alternate Energy Prototypes
New-Evaluate 13.2.5 Curatorial Facilities, Planetary Protection, and Clean Rooms
13.3 Reliability and Maintainability 13.3 Technologies to Increase F460 13.3 Technologies to Increase Reliability and Mission Availability
Revised-DNR 13.3.1 Launch Infrastructure 13.3.1 Advanced Launch Technologies 13.3.1 Advanced Launch Technologies
13.3.2 Environment-Hardened Materials and Structures 13.3.2 Environment-Hardened Materials and Structures 13.3.2 Environment-Hardened Materials and Structures
13.3.3 On-Site Inspection and Anomaly Detection and Identification 13.3.3 Inspection, Anomaly Detection, and Identification 13.3.3 Inspection, Anomaly Detection, and Identification
13.3.4 Fault Isolation and Diagnostics 13.3.4 Fault Isolation and Diagnostics 13.3.4 Fault Isolation and Diagnostics
13.3.5 Prognostics 13.3.5 Prognostics Technologies 13.3.5 Prognostics Technologies
13.3.6 Repair, Mitigation, and Recovery Technologies 13.3.6 Repair, Mitigation, and Recovery Technologies 13.3.6 Repair, Mitigation, and Recovery Technologies
13.3.7 Communications, Networking, Timing, and Telemetry 13.3.7 Communications, Networking, Timing, and Telemetry 13.3.7 Communications, Networking, Timing and Telemetry
New-Evaluate 13.3.8 Decision-Making Tools
13.4 Mission Success 13.4 Technologies to Improve Mission Safety/Mission Risk 13.4 Technologies to Improve Mission Safety/Mission Risk
13.4.1 Range Tracking, Surveillance, and Flight Safety Technologies 13.4.1 Range Tracking, Surveillance, and Flight Safety Technologies 13.4.1 Range Tracking, Surveillance and Flight Safety Technologies
13.4.2 Landing and Recovery Systems and Components 13.4.2 Landing and Recovery Systems and Components 13.4.2 Landing and Recovery Systems and Components
13.4.3 Weather Prediction and Mitigation 13.4.3 Weather Prediction and Mitigation 13.4.3 Weather Prediction and Mitigation
Elsewhere 13.4.4 Robotics and Telerobotics 13.4.4 Robotics/TeleRobotics 13.4.4 Robotics/Telerobotics
13.4.5 Safety Systems 13.4.5 Safety Systems 13.4.5 Safety Systems
TA 14 Thermal Management Systems TA 14 Thermal Management Systems TA 14 Thermal Management Systems
14.1 Cryogenic Systems 14.1 Cryogenic Systems 14.1 Cryogenic Systems
14.1.1 Passive Thermal Control 14.1.1 Passive Thermal Control 14.1.1 Passive Thermal Control
14.1.2 Active Thermal Control 14.1.2 Active Thermal Control 14.1.2 Active Thermal Control
Elsewhere 14.1.3 Integration and Modeling 14.1.3 Systems Integration 14.1.3 Integration and Modeling
14.2 Thermal Control Systems 14.2 Thermal Control Systems 14.2 Thermal Control Systems
14.2.1 Heat Acquisition 14.2.1 Heat Acquisition 14.2.1 Heat Acquisition
14.2.2 Heat Transport 14.2.2 Heat Transfer 14.2.2 Heat Transfer
14.2.3 Heat Rejection and Energy Storage 14.2.3 Heat Rejection and Energy Storage 14.2.3 Heat Rejection and Energy Storage
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
14.3 Thermal Protection Systems 14.3 Thermal Protection Systems 14.3 Thermal Protection Systems
14.3.1 Ascent/Entry TPS 14.3.1 Ascent/Entry TPS 14.3.1 Entry/Ascent TPS
Revised-Evaluate 14.3.2 TPS Modeling and Simulation 14.3.2 Plume Shielding (Convective and Radiative) 14.3.2 Plume Shielding (Convective and Radiative)
14.3.3 TPS Sensors and Measurement Systems 14.3.3 Sensor Systems and Measurement Technologies 14.3.3 Sensor Systems and Measurement Technologies
n/a TA 15 Aeronautics

NOTE: NASA’s 2015 TABS includes a new TA 15, Aeronautics. However, that technology area is outside the scope of this study and so the technologies for TA 15 do not appear in Table B.1.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Comparison of the Technology Area Breakdown Structures for 2010, 2012, 2015." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23582.
×
Page 77
Next: Appendix C: 2012 Review and Prioritization Methodology »
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Historically, the United States has been a world leader in aerospace endeavors in both the government and commercial sectors. A key factor in aerospace leadership is continuous development of advanced technology, which is critical to U.S. ambitions in space, including a human mission to Mars. To continue to achieve progress, NASA is currently executing a series of aeronautics and space technology programs using a roadmapping process to identify technology needs and improve the management of its technology development portfolio.

NASA created a set of 14 draft technology roadmaps in 2010 to guide the development of space technologies. In 2015, NASA issued a revised set of roadmaps. A significant new aspect of the update has been the effort to assess the relevance of the technologies by listing the enabling and enhancing technologies for specific design reference missions (DRMs) from the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate and the Science Mission Directorate. NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities Revisited prioritizes new technologies in the 2015 roadmaps and recommends a methodology for conducting independent reviews of future updates to NASA’s space technology roadmaps, which are expected to occur every 4 years.

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