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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
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B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

LTC Albert A. Sciarretta, U.S. Army, retired, Professional Engineer, is president of CNS Technologies, Inc. In this position, he works primarily as an independent consultant, supporting various Department of Defense (DoD) organizations in assessing the military benefits of new technologies. For more than 30 years, as a U.S. Army officer and civilian contractor, he has used his operational, research and development, operations research, and human performance assessment experience to assess the military benefits of advanced technologies and develop technology investment strategies. For the past 20 years, a significant amount of this time has focused on designing and executing war games, experiments, and demonstrations for the Army, Office of the Secretary of Defense, and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and using combinations of live-virtual-constructive simulations to represent operations ranging from Joint through tactical urban settings. For the DoD Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (T&E/S&T) Program, he has served more than 14 years as a subject matter expert for advanced test technologies. A recent T&E/S&T task required him to develop a “use case” for identifying counter unmanned aircraft system (CUAS) test instrumentation needs. He also serves as a senior research fellow in the National Defense University (NDU) Center for Technology and National Security Policy (CTNSP), where he assesses future warfighting system capabilities. He recently developed course content for an NDU course on prototyping and experimentation (P&E), including blocks of instruction on defining P&E, experimental design, and a case study focused on CUAS experimentation. He published a CTNSP technology paper on micro-autonomous air/ground systems for dismounted infantry squads. Mr. Sciarretta has a B.S. degree in general engineering from the U.S. Military Academy and dual M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and operations research from Stanford University. He previously served as a member of six committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including committees on Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technologies and Making the Soldier Decisive on Future Battlefields. He is currently a member of the National Academies Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST).

Dr. Julie A. Adams is a full professor in the School of Computer Science and Robotics in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Oregon State University. Previously, she was a professor of computer science and computer engineering at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Adams develops human-robot interaction (HRI) and distributed artificial intelligence methods resulting in robot systems for real-time mission deployment in dynamic environments. Her research in artificial intelligence develops distributed coalition formation and task planning algorithms for distributed teams of humans and robots. Her HRI research focuses on capabilities for humans to supervise and task large, heterogeneous robot teams and understand robot-provided information (supporting human decision making and situation awareness). She previously served on the National Academies’ Committee on Mainstreaming Unmanned Undersea Vehicles into Future U.S. Naval Operations, the NASA Technology Roadmap: Robotics, Communication and Navigation Panel, and on the Panel on Soldier Systems. She received her B.S. in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
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computer science and B.B.A. in accounting from Siena College and a M.S.E. and Ph.D. in computer and information systems from the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Frederick R. Chang is the executive director of the Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security, the Bobby B. Lyle Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security, and a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University. He is also a senior fellow in the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies at SMU’s Dedman College. He is the former director of research at the National Security Agency (NSA) and has been awarded the NSA Director’s Distinguished Service Medal. Dr. Chang is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is co-chair of the Intelligence Community Studies Board of the National Academies where he has also served as a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Dr. Chang received his B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Oregon. He also completed the senior executive program at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Dr. James A. Freebersyser is director of Advanced Systems at BBN Technologies. In this position, he leads business development efforts for external funding of new technology development, primarily at DARPA, and transition of existing technology efforts, including technical concept development, market strategy, and business planning. Prior to joining BBN, Dr. Freebersyser was the technology portfolio manager for the Navigation, Communications, and Control (NCC) Directorate at Honeywell. Dr. Freebersyser also worked as a program manager at the DARPA Advanced Technology Office, on detail from the Army Research Laboratory. He received his B.S.E. in electrical engineering from Duke University, an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University. Dr: Freebersyser is also a member of the BAST.

Dr. J. Sean Humbert is the McLagan Endowed Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Previously, he was the Techno-Sciences Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering Innovation in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. Dr. Humbert’s research interests include bio-inspired robotics, estimation, and control theory, with applications to Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). Recent work has focused on the flight mechanics and distributed sensing and estimation approaches in small-scale organisms, including insect-based perception and navigation in cluttered, uncertain environments. Best paper honors include the AIAA Conference on Guidance, Navigation, and Control, the American Control Conference, and the International Conference on Insect Sensors and Robotics. Dr. Humbert is an AIAA associate fellow, has recently won the AIAA National Capital Section Hal Andrews Young Scientist/Engineer Award, and is the recipient of an ARO Young Investigator Award. He is director of the MAST-CTA on Microsystem Mechanics, co-director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Center of Excellence on Nature Inspired Flight Technologies and is the director of the Autonomous Vehicle Laboratory at the University of Maryland. He is also a member of the BAST. Dr. Humbert holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Davis, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Paul Kolodzy is an independent consultant at Kolodzy Consulting, LLC. He has worked on a wide variety of technologies, including software defined radios, cognitive radios, and advanced wireless service. Dr. Kolodzy also has experience in spectrum use and the research and development of new methods to access the radio frequency spectrum for consumer, commercial, scientific, and government applications. Dr. Kolodzy also has significant experience with sensor technologies, including acoustic, ultraviolet, infrared, and laser radar systems. He has served on the National Academies Committee on a Survey of the Scientific Use of the Radio Spectrum, the Committee to Study Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy, and the Committee on a Survey of the Active Scientific Use of the Radio Spectrum.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
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Dr. Vijay Kumar1 is the Nemirovsky Family Dean at the School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kumar’s research group works on creating autonomous ground and aerial robots, designing bio-inspired algorithms for collective behaviors, and on robot swarms. His expertise in collaborative and swarming robotic operations make him particularly well-suited to address the study sponsor’s main point of concern. Dr. Kumar is a member of the NAE, and his selection for NAE membership was for “contributions in cooperative robotics, networked vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles, and for leadership in robotics research and education.” Dr. Kumar served on Panel G: Human Exploration Systems and Mobility and Autonomous Systems and Robotics under the Committee for the Review of NASA’s Capability Roadmaps.

Dr. Terry P. Lewis is an independent consultant. Previously, he was the site executive and senior systems engineer at the Raytheon Company. He also has a wide base of expertise encompassing communications, electronic warfare, and cybersecurity. In addition, Dr. Lewis has developed anti-tampering technologies to prevent or reduce the ability of potential adversaries or competitors to reverse-engineer critical U.S. communications technologies. He is a Raytheon fellow and received the Most Promising Engineer of the Year award at the 2002 Black Engineer of the Year Award Conference. Dr. Lewis is a member of the National Academies Naval Studies Board and the Panel on Assessment and Analysis at the Army Research Laboratory, and he has served on the Committee on Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare and the Committee on Examination of the Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Capability Planning and Analysis (CP&A) Process.

Dr. Todd D. Murphey is a professor at the Neuroscience and Robotics Lab at Northwestern University, where his research focuses on computational methods in dynamics and control with applications in neuroscience, robotics, and automation. Dr. Murphey’s research group focuses on computational models of embedded control, biomechanical simulation, dynamic exploration, and hybrid control. The mathematical approaches used by the group lead to many orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency for reliable real-time implementation. Applications include assistive exoskeleton control, stabilization of energy networks, bio-inspired active sensing, entertainment robots, and robotic exploration.

Dr. Gabriel Rebeiz2 is a distinguished professor at the University of California, San Diego. His expertise includes design of silicon radio frequency integrated circuits for microwave and millimeter-wave systems with a specialty on phased arrays and low- power circuits; active and passive imaging systems up to terahertz (THz) frequencies (including thermal imagers); THz complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, and SiGe electronics, radio frequency (RF) micro-electro-mechanical systems, reconfigurable front-ends, including tunable filters and tunable antennas, cognitive radios, planar antennas from RF to THz frequencies, radars, and collision avoidance systems for automotive applications. Dr. Rebeiz is a member of the NAE.

LTG Michael A. Vane, U.S. Army, retired, is an independent consultant. Previously, he was group vice president for Training and Intelligence Solutions, DynCorp International, a leader of approximately 5,000 employees globally, serving areas of training, intelligence, and special operations forces roles to DoD and State Department customers. General Vane has expertise in training and intelligence solutions with standards, certifications, and delivery methods to meet customer needs. He managed multiple programs worth more than $500 million annually for a diverse customer set. Prior to DynCorp, General Vane was an executive advisor at Booz Allen Hamilton where his responsibility was to advise in the capability area

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1 Dr. Kumar resigned from the committee on April 15, 2017. Due to circumstances beyond his control, he was unable to participate in the report drafting and concurrence process.

2 Dr. Rebeiz resigned from the committee on April 10, 2017. Due to circumstances beyond his control, he was unable to participate in the report drafting and concurrence process.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
×

of Analytics in DoD markets- specifically, working on requirements development, live virtual-training analysis to improve home station training, improved costing and readiness models, and institutional transformation. Before retiring to civilian life, General Vane served as the deputy commanding general, futures/director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC) at the U.S. Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC). In his 36-year Army career, he has served as the vice director, J8, Force Structure, Resources and Assessments; commanding general, U.S. Army Air Defense Center at Fort Bliss, Texas; deputy chief of staff for Doctrine, Concepts and Strategy at TRADOC; Commanding General 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command; and Director of Integration, deputy chief of staff for operations and force development. He is also a member of the BAST. General Vane received a B.S. in general engineering from U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and an M.S. in systems technology from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Counter-Unmanned Aircraft System (CUAS) Capability for Battalion-and-Below Operations: Abbreviated Version of a Restricted Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24747.
×
Page 30
Next: Appendix C Additional Definitions »
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The development of inexpensive small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) technologies and the growing desire of hobbyists to have more and more capability have created a sustained sUAS industry, however these capabilities are directly enabling the ability of adversaries to threaten U.S. interests. In response to these threats, the U.S. Army and other Department of Defense (DoD) organizations have invested significantly in counter-sUAS technologies, often focusing on detecting radio frequency transmissions by sUASs and/or their operators, and jamming the radio frequency command and control links and Global Positioning System signals of individual sUASs. However, today’s consumer and customized sUASs can increasingly operate without radio frequency command and control links by using automated target recognition and tracking, obstacle avoidance, and other software-enabled capabilities.

The U.S. Army tasked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study to address the above concerns. In particular, the committee was asked to assess the sUAS threat, particularly when massed and collaborating; assess current capabilities of battalion-and- below infantry units to counter sUASs; identify counter-sUAS technologies appropriate for near- term, mid-term, and far-term science and technology investment; consider human factors and logistics; and determine if the Department of Homeland Security could benefit from DoD efforts. This abbreviated report provides background information on the full report and the committee that prepared it.

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