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Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops (2017)

Chapter: References

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Page 33
Suggested Citation:"References ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24806.
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Page 33
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"References ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24806.
×
Page 34

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

34 “Adopt-a-Stop,” Arlington Transit, Va., n.d. [Online]. Available: http://www.arlingtontransit.com/ pages/about/adopt-a-stop/ [accessed May 10, 2016]. Alberts, B., A.A. Mazhar, and K.A. Gayle, Transit and Climate Change Adaptation: Synthesis of FTA-Funded Pilot Projects, FTA Report No. 0069, FTA, Washington, D.C., 2014. Asam, S., C. Bhat, J. Bauer, and D. Gopalkrishna, Climate Change Adaptation Guide for Transporta- tion Systems Management, Operations, and Maintenance, Report FHWA-HOP-15-026, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C., 2015. Brooks, J., et al., Gulf Coast Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Study, FTA Report No. 0072, Federal Transit Administration, Washington, D.C., 2013. Chan, S., “Remembering a Snowstorm That Paralyzed the City,” The New York Times, Feb. 10, 2009. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Climate Change Adaptation & Extreme Weather Vulner- ability Assessment, FHWA, Washington, D.C., 2012. Flegenheimer, M., “Leaders in New York and New Jersey Defend Shutdown for a Blizzard That Wasn’t,” The New York Times, Jan. 27, 2015. Flooded Bus Barns and Buckled Rails: Public Transportation and Climate Change Adaptation, Federal Transit Administration, Washington, D.C., 2011. “It’s Cold and My Car Is Buried in Snow. Is Global Warming Really Happening?” Union of Con- cerned Scientists, Dec. 17, 2015 [Online]. Available: http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/ science_and_impacts/science/cold-snow-climate-change.html#.WMruim_yuHs [accessed July 16, 2016]. Kaiser, S., “The Blizzard of 1978—What Was it Like To Get Around,” Cambridge Community Televi- sion, Mar. 22, 2015 [Online]. Available: https://www.cctvcambridge.org/node/316925 [accessed July 17, 2016]. Lazo, L., “Caution Urged at Bus Stops. Snow Piles Likely to be There for a While,” The Washington Post, Jan. 26, 2016 [Online]. Available: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/ 2016/01/26/caution-urged-at-bus-stops-snow-piles-likely-to-be-there-for-a-while/?utm_term=. ae375df44399 [accessed April 17, 2016] Levin, A., “NJ Transit Had $400 Million in Hurricane Sandy Damage,” Bloomberg.com, Dec. 6, 2012 [accessed Apr. 16, 2016]. Liban, C.B., M. Egge, and C. Markovitz, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project, FTA Report No. 0073, FTA, Washington, D.C., 2013. “MBTA Bus Stops and Snow Removal: Who’s Responsible?” MBTA.com, Massachusetts Bay Trans- portation Authority, n.d. [accessed Apr. 28, 2016]. Melillo, J.M., T. (T.C.) Richmond, and G.W. Yohe, Eds., Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment, U.S. Global Change Research Program, Washington, D.C., 2014, 841 pp. Schworm, P., E. Allen, and L. Crimaldi, “Roads Open, MBTA Operating as Region Digs Way Out of Historic Blizzard of 2015,” The Boston Globe, BostonGlobe.com. Jan. 2015 [Online]. Available: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/01/28/roads-open-mbta-operating-region-digs-way- out-historic-blizzard/g9Ch43F5ldtC9kS3FPRmVK/story.html [accessed July 17, 2016]. Snow Removal Fact Sheet, Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities, New York, N.Y., 2016, n.d. [Online]. Available: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mopd/downloads/pdf/Snow-Removal-One-sheeter- with-DSNYs-revisions-version-8.pdf. Taney, P., “Who Is Responsible for Keeping Bus Stops Clear?” WHEC Rochester, Feb. 9, 2015 [accessed Apr. 28, 2016]. Tempey, N., “Most Roads Are Clear, Why Not the Crosswalks?” Gothamist, Jan. 25, 2016 [Online]. Available: http://gothamist.com/2016/01/25/clearing_snow_for_cars.php [accessed Apr. 28, 2016]. Thomson, B., E. Delaney, S. Eget, and L. Gallagher, Resilience of NJ TRANSIT Assets to Climate Impacts, NJ Transit, Newark, 2012. Thomson, B., I. Matos, and J. Previdi, TCRP Synthesis 123: On Board Applications for Buses, Trans- portation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., May 2016, 70 pp. REFERENCES

35 Union of Concerned Scientists, “It’s Cold and My Car Is Buried in Snow. Is Global Warming Really Happening?” Union of Concerned Scientists, Washington, D.C., Dec. 17, 2015 [Online]. Available: http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/science_and_impacts/science/cold-snow-climate-change. html#.WMruim_yuHs [accessed July 16, 2016]. U.S.DOT, Climate Adaptation Plan 2014: Ensuring Transportation Infrastructure and System Resilience, U.S.DOT, Washington D.C., 2014, 29 pp. Wald, M.L. and J. Schwartz, “Weather Extremes Leave Parts of U.S. Grid Buckling,” The New York Times, July 26, 2012 [Online]. Available: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/26/us/rise-in-weather- extremes-threatens-infrastructure.html [accessed Apr. 28, 2016].

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TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Synthesis 129: Managing Extreme Weather at Bus Stops documents current practices of transit systems to determine methods and procedures used for maintaining transit stops and associated infrastructure during and following such weather events. This synthesis provides a state-of-the-practice report on transit systems' management of extreme weather events; associated planning; management responsibilities; efforts to respond; standards and specifications; associated legal claims; and communication with customers.

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