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Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
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References for Part I

All URL addresses valid as of April 2017. Please note that, as of February 2017, U.S. Office of Management and Budget documents previously on the main whitehouse.gov site were relocated to an archived site. Wherever possible, a citation is provided to a stable site such as federalregister.gov.

Anderson, M. J. (2015). The American Census: A Social History (3rd ed.). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Chetty, R., N. Hendren, P. Kline, E. Saez, and N. Turner (2014). Is the United States still a land of opportunity? Recent trends in intergenerational mobility. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings 104(5), 141–147. Available: https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.104.5.141; National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper version available: https://doi.org/10.3386/w19844.

Citro, C. F. (2014a). From multiple modes for surveys to multiple data sources for estimates. Survey Methodology 40(2), 137–161. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-001-x/2014002/article/14128-eng.htm.

Citro, C. F. (2014b). Principles and practices for a federal statistical agency: Why, what, and to what effect. Statistics and Public Policy 1(1), 51–59. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2330443X.2014.912953.

Citro, C. F. (2016). The US federal statistical system’s past, present, and future. Annual Review of Statistics and Its Application 3(1), 347–373. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-statistics-041715-033405.

Czajka, J. (2009). SIPP data quality. Pp. 157–178 in National Research Council, Reengineering the Survey of Income and Program Participation. Panel on the Census Bureau’s Reengineered Survey of Income and Program Participation, C.F. Citro and J.K. Scholz, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12715.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
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Duncan, J. W. and W. C. Shelton (1978). Revolution in United States Statistics, 1926–1976. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/007886111/Home.

Eberstadt, N., R. Nunn, D. W. Schanzenbach, and M. R. Strain (2017). “In Order That They Might Rest Their Arguments on Facts”: The Vital Role of Government-Collected Data. Washington, DC: The Hamilton Project (Brookings Institution) and American Enterprise Institute. Available: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/thp_20170227_govt_collected_data_report.pdf.

Economics and Statistics Administration (2014). Fostering Innovation, Creating Jobs, Driving Better Decisions: The Value of Government Data. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce. Available: https://esa.gov/sites/default/files/revisedfosteringinnovationcreatingjobsdrivingbetterdecisionsthevalueofgovernmentdata.pdf.

European Statistical System Committee (2011). European Statistics Code of Practice for the National and Community Statistical Authorities. Luxembourg: Eurostat. Available: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/products-manuals-and-guidelines/-/KS-32-11-955.

Gravelle, H. and R. Rees (2004). Microeconomics (3rd ed.). Essex, UK: Pearson Education Limited. Available: https://ignorelist.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/microeconomics-gravelle-and-rees.pdf.

Groves, R. M. (2011). Three eras of survey research. Public Opinion Quarterly 75(5), 861–871. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/poq/nfr057.

McMillen, D. (2012). Apportionment and districting. Pp. 49–58 in Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census: From the Constitution to the American Community Survey (ACS) (2nd edition). M.J. Anderson, C.F. Citro, and J.J. Salvo, eds. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017a). Innovations in Federal Statistics Using New Data Sources While Respecting Privacy. Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods, R.M. Groves and B.A. Harris-Kojetin, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/24652.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017b). Principles and Practices for Federal Program Evaluation: Proceedings of a Workshop—In Brief. J. White, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/24716.

National Research Council (1985). Natural Gas Data Needs in a Changing Regulatory Environment. Panel on Natural Gas Statistics, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/19272.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (1991). Improving Information for Social Policy Decisions: The Uses of Microsimulation. Volume I: Review and Recommendations. Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/1835.

National Research Council (1995). Modernizing the U.S. Census. Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 Census and Beyond, B. Edmonston and C. Schultze, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/4805.

National Research Council (1997a). Assessing Policies for Retirement Income: Needs for Data, Research, and Models. Panel on Retirement Income Modeling, C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/5420.

National Research Council (1997b). The Bureau of Transportation Statistics: Priorities for the Future. Panel on Statistical Programs and Practices of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, C.F. Citro and J.L. Norwood, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Transportation Research Board. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/5809.

National Research Council (1999). Sowing Seeds of Change: Informing Public Policy in the Economic Research Service of USDA. Panel to Study the Research Program of the Economic Research Service, J.F. Geweke, J.T. Bonnen, A.A. White, and J.J. Koshel, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/6320.

National Research Council (2000). Small-Area Income and Poverty Estimates: Priorities for 2000 and Beyond. Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/9957.

National Research Council (2001). Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs, R.A. Moffitt and M. Ver Ploeg, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10020.

National Research Council (2003). Statistical Issues in Allocating Funds by Formula. Panel on Formula Allocations, T.A. Louis, T.B. Jabine, and M.A. Gerstein, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10580.

National Research Council (2005). Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities. Panel on Data Access for Research Purposes, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11434.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (2007a). State and Local Government Statistics at a Crossroads. Panel on Research and Development Priorities for the U.S. Census Bureau’s State and Local Government Statistics Program. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12000.

National Research Council (2007b). Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges. Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11901.

National Research Council (2008). Rebuilding the Research Capacity at HUD. Committee to Evaluate the Research Plan of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Center for Governance, Economic, and International Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12468.

National Research Council (2010a). Data on Federal Research and Development Investments: A Pathway to Modernization. Panel on Modernizing the Infrastructure of the National Science Foundation Federal Funds Survey, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12772.

National Research Council (2010b). Improving Health Care Cost Projections for the Medical Population: Summary of a Workshop. G. Wunderlich, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12985.

National Research Council (2012a). Effective Tracking of Building Energy Use: Improving the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the Energy Information Administration, W.F. Eddy and K. Marton, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/13360.

National Research Council (2012b). Using Science as Evidence in Public Policy. Committee on the Use of Social Science Knowledge in Public Policy, K. Prewitt, T.A. Schwandt, and M.L. Straf, eds. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/13460.

National Research Council (2013a). Benefits, Burdens, and Prospects of the American Community Survey: Summary of a Workshop. D.L. Cork, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18259.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (2013b). Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, Fifth Edition. Committee on National Statistics, C.F. Citro and M.L. Straf, eds.. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18318.

National Research Council (2015). The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990: 30th Anniversary Edition. Panel on Decennial Census Methodology, C.F. Citro and M.L. Cohen, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/21728/the-bicentennial-census-new-directions-for-methodology-in-1990-30th.

Norwood, J. L. (1995). Organizing to Count: Change in the Federal Statistical System. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press.

Norwood, J. L. (2016). Politics and federal statistics. Statistics and Public Policy 3(1), 1–8. American Statistical Association Distinguished Statistician Lecture, 2000. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2330443X.2016.1241061.

Prewitt, K. (Ed.) (2010, September). The Federal Statistical System: Its Vulnerability Matters More Than You Think, Volume 631 of The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Available: http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/anna/631/1.

Privacy Protection Study Commission (1977). Personal Privacy in an Information Society: The Report of The Privacy Protection Study Commission. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000293901.

Reamer, A. D. (2010). Surveying for Dollars: The Role of the American Community Survey in the Geographic Distribution of Federal Funds. Metropolitan Policy Program. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution. Available: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/0726_acs_reamer.pdf.

Singer, E. (2016). Reflections on surveys’ past and future. Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology 4(4), 463–475.

Spencer, B. D. (Ed.) (1997). Statistics and Public Policy. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.

UNECE Task Force on the Value of Official Statistics (2017, March). Value of Official Statistics: Recommendations on Promoting, Measuring and Communicating the Value of Official Statistics. Report of the task force to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Conference of European Statisticians. Geneva: United Nations. Available: https://www.unece.org/statistics/statstos/task-force-onthe-value-of-official-statistics.html.

United Nations Statistical Commission (2014, March 3). Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics. New York: United Nations. Endorsed by the General Assembly as Resolution A/RES/68/261. Available: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/gp/FP-New-E.pdf.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

U.S. General Accounting Office (1995). Statistical Agencies: Adherence to Guidelines and Coordination of Budgets. Report No. GGD-95-65. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: http://www.gao.gov/products/GGD-95-65.

U.S. Government Accountability Office (2007). Bureau of Justice Statistics: Quality Guidelines Generally Followed for Police-Public Contact Surveys, but Opportunities Exist to Help Assure Agency Independence. Report No. GAO-07-340. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-07-340.

U.S. Government Accountability Office (2012). Federal Statistical System: Agencies Can Make Greater Use of Existing Data, but Continued Progress Is Needed on Access and Quality Issues. Report No. GAO-12-54. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-54.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (1985). Statistical Policy Directive No. 3: Compilation, release, and evaluation of principal federal economic indicators. 50 Federal Register 38932 (September 25, 1985). Available: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/omb/inforeg/statpolicy/dir_3_fr_09251985.pdf.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2007). Implementation guidance for Title V of the E-Government Act, Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA). 72 Federal Register 33362 (June 15, 2007). Available: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/E7-11542.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2014). Statistical Policy Directive No. 1: Fundamental responsibilities of federal statistical agencies and recognized statistical units. 79 Federal Register 71609 (December 2, 2014). Available: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2014-28326.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2016). Analytical Perspectives, Budget of the U.S. Government, Fiscal Year 2017. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/BUDGET-2017-PER/pdf/BUDGET-2017-PER.pdf.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2017). Statistical Programs of the United States Government: Fiscal Year 2017. Statistical and Science Policy Office, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/information_and_regulatory_affairs/statistical-programs-2017.pdf.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"References for Part I." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 38
Next: Part II: Principles for a Federal Statistical Agency »
Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition Get This Book
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Publicly available statistics from government agencies that are credible, relevant, accurate, and timely are essential for policy makers, individuals, households, businesses, academic institutions, and other organizations to make informed decisions. Even more, the effective operation of a democratic system of government depends on the unhindered flow of statistical information to its citizens.

In the United States, federal statistical agencies in cabinet departments and independent agencies are the governmental units whose principal function is to compile, analyze, and disseminate information for such statistical purposes as describing population characteristics and trends, planning and monitoring programs, and conducting research and evaluation. The work of these agencies is coordinated by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Statistical agencies may acquire information not only from surveys or censuses of people and organizations, but also from such sources as government administrative records, private-sector datasets, and Internet sources that are judged of suitable quality and relevance for statistical use. They may conduct analyses, but they do not advocate policies or take partisan positions. Statistical purposes for which they provide information relate to descriptions of groups and exclude any interest in or identification of an individual person, institution, or economic unit.

Four principles are fundamental for a federal statistical agency: relevance to policy issues, credibility among data users, trust among data providers, and independence from political and other undue external influence.Β Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition presents and comments on these principles as they’ve been impacted by changes in laws, regulations, and other aspects of the environment of federal statistical agencies over the past 4 years.

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