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Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators

Angela Beck is principal investigator and director of the Behavioral Health Workforce Research Center at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where she also serves as clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, director of the Michigan Public Health Training Center, associate director of the Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies, and managing director of the Office for Student Engagement and Practice. She began her career in a Health Resources and Services Administration fellowship in the former Bureau of Health Professions. Since joining the University of Michigan, she has served in management and research roles to conduct national studies on workforce size, composition, and characteristics for public health nurses, epidemiologists, laboratory workers, and other public health disciplines. Her research efforts are now focused on development of a minimum dataset, studies of characteristics and practice settings, and analysis of professional and legal scopes of practice for the behavioral health workforce. She holds a bachelor’s degree in physiology from Michigan State University and M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan School of Public Health in health behavior and health education.

Harolyn M.E. Belcher is director of the Center for Diversity in Public Health Leadership Training at Kennedy Krieger Institute and professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is the codirector of the National Center for Health Policy Research Scholars. Her research has included a cost comparison of two evidence-based parent interventions for young children with emotional and behavioral problems; a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

community-based Head Start family and child behavioral health prevention intervention grant; provision of comprehensive substance abuse treatment, health care, social work, parent education, and evaluations for women who were pregnant and drug-dependent and, following birth, their children; and community-based initiatives to support African American parents participating in church-based foster care for children with fetal drug exposure and HIV infection. While in Florida, she directed the Developmental Evaluation and Intervention Program at University of South Florida. She received an M.D. from Howard University.

Christopher Bellonci is a board-certified child/adolescent and adult psychiatrist and associate professor in the Psychiatry Department of Tufts University School of Medicine. He is a member of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Workgroup on Quality Issues and currently leads the Clinical Distance Learning Series of the TA Network in support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Systems of Care initiative. He is a founding member of SAMHSA’s Building Bridges Initiative and LGBTQI2-S National Workgroup. He was also a member of the Outcomes Roundtable for Children and Families. He is a past president of the Association of Children’s Residential Centers. He provides consultation, lectures, and technical assistance nationally on the subjects of child psychiatric practice, foster care, special education, residential treatment, sexual minority youth, and mental health best practices.

Johanna Bergan is executive director for Youth M.O.V.E. National (YMN). She advocates for changes in the mental health system to improve the care options and treatment availability for young adults with mental health challenges. She has provided input on several national platforms including advising technical assistance and research and training centers that support and promote the value of youth voice. She assists YMN chapters in creating and promoting successful youth-driven organizations working to unite the voices and causes of youth at the local, state, and national levels. She also provides direct technical assistance to System of Care, Healthy Transitions, and Project Aware grantees, and she develops products and training materials to support the effective and sustained work of grantees. Prior to her position at YMN, she served with the Technical Assistance Partnership, Pathways to Positive Futures at Portland State University Research and Training Center, Rutgers University, the STAR Center, and the Program to Achieve Wellness.

Ryan M. Beveridge is director of the Center for Training, Evaluation and Community Collaboration (C-TECC) and associate professor of psychological and brain sciences at the University of Delaware. He is also codirector

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

of clinical training within the university’s Clinical Science Ph.D. program. He has worked to increase continuity in graduate-level training among the diverse research, clinical, and community experiences of students. Through the Delaware Project, which he cofounded and coleads, he focuses on training future psychologists to utilize their laboratory research and clinical work as mutually informative experiences. At C-TECC, he collaborates with treatment developers, graduate students, and community partners to train, disseminate, and evaluate evidence-based practices. He has a special interest in developing and supporting innovative outcome-based training and accreditation models that facilitate the training of psychologists poised to meet the demands of community mental health challenges. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Utah.

Thomas F. Boat is dean emeritus of the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and professor of pediatrics in the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Earlier he directed the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and chaired the UC College of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. He also was physician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital Medical Center. A pediatric pulmonologist, he defined the pathophysiology of airway dysfunction and more effective therapies for chronic lung diseases of childhood, such as cystic fibrosis. He has a special interest in issues posed by children’s mental health for pediatric care, research, and training. He joined Cincinnati Children’s Hospital after serving as chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been a board member and president of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc. He also has served as chair of the American Board of Pediatrics and president of both the Society for Pediatric Research and the American Pediatric Society. He received an M.D. from the University of Iowa.

Susan Burger is the director of Family Peer Advocate Credentialing and Workforce Development at Families Together in New York State, with personal and professional experience in the field of peer-to-peer support and advocacy. She provides outreach and assistance to family support programs and caregivers interested in becoming professional family peer support workers. She works closely with the Community Technical Assistance Center on projects related to parent empowerment program training, continuing education for family peer advocates and their supervisors, and overall growth and sustainability of family peer support services. She has a B.A. from CUNY Brooklyn College, a New York State Family Development Credential from Cornell University Division of Continuing Education, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

a Family Peer Advocate Credential from Families Together in New York State.

Susan A. Chapman is professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, and faculty member in UCSF’s Healthforce Center and the Institute for Health Policy Studies. She is codirector of the master’s and doctoral programs in health policy at the School of Nursing. Her scholarly work focuses on health workforce research and policy analysis with a focus on behavioral health, long-term care, and new and expanded roles for health care workers.

Elizabeth H. Connors is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a faculty member at the national Center for School Mental Health. Her dissertation focused on studying the impact of training methods on school-based mental health clinicians’ knowledge of, attitudes toward, and use of evidence-based interventions. Her research and clinical work has focused on improving access to and quality of mental health care for underserved children and families. In her role at the Center for School Mental Health, she provides training, technical assistance, and evaluation supports to mental health agencies, schools, districts, and behavioral health systems at local, state, and national levels. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and has worked as a school-based mental health clinician, and now supervisor, in numerous Baltimore City Public Schools. She received her Ph.D. in child-clinical/community psychology.

Adele Foerster is the chief credentialing officer of the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board (PNCB). She oversees exam development, as well as job task and role research, for four PNCB certifications. She is also responsible for continuing education products. She worked in the Emergency Department at Holy Cross Hospital in Maryland until joining PNCB. She has served in a variety of nursing roles including pediatric home care, research data collection at Baltimore’s Shock Trauma Units, nursing staff development, and teaching at the Uniformed Services University. She continues to provide care as a part-time pediatric nurse practitioner at Holy Cross Hospital. She graduated from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Nursing and the University of Maryland and holds a pediatric nurse practitioner post-master’s certificate from Johns Hopkins University.

Gregory Fritz is the director of the Bradley Hasbro Children’s Research Center. He also serves as the president of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, where he focuses on the integration of medical and mental health care. He is an advocate for mental health parity,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

expanding the child mental health research base, increasing access to child mental health services and expanding the workforce, and developing a more rational and effective mental health delivery system. His research deals with mind/body interactions in chronic medical illness. He has studied the psychophysiology of asthma, asthma disparities, the psychology of physical symptoms, sociocultural factors affecting disease management, and physician-patient interactions. He graduated from Brown University and received his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine.

Bianca Kiyoe Frogner is an associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine, director of the Center for Health Workforce Studies, and deputy director of the Primary Care Innovation Lab in the School of Medicine at the University of Washington (UW). Prior to joining UW, she was an assistant professor in the Health Services Management and Leadership Department in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University (GW). At GW, she was the deputy director of the Health Workforce Research Center. She is a health economist with expertise in health workforce, labor economics, health spending, health insurance coverage and reimbursement, international health systems, and welfare reform. She received her B.A. at University of California, Berkeley, in molecular and cell biology and a Ph.D. in health economics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health.

Breck Gamel is a patient advocate and blogger at initforbennett.com. She is the mother of three children, including Bennett, age 7, with cystic fibrosis. She advocates in public policy for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and serves on the board of the foundation’s Dallas chapter. She is leader within the Cystic Fibrosis Learning Network and cochairs the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Patient and Family Research Advisory Council.

Lynda Gargan serves as the executive director for the National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health. Under her guidance, the federation has fully operationalized the Parent Support Provider Certification Initiative. Previously she was project manager and project director for two Federal Supported Employment Technical Assistance Centers and served as chief executive officer for an agency specializing in intensive in-home family therapy services. She has a background in field research, including longitudinal studies in multiple class action law suits. She currently serves as a partner in the national evaluation of System of Care grantees and principal collaborator with the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors’ Technical Assistance Coalition.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

Costella Green serves as the branch chief for the Community Grants and System Improvement Branch at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. She provides leadership to the Drug-Free Communities Support Program and Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking (STOP Act) Grant Programs. She has developed prerelease curriculum and provided counseling and training for individuals re-entering the community. As senior training specialist for Prevention First (Bureau of Substance Abuse Prevention with the State of Illinois) and the Center of Applied Prevention Technology, she trained community-based providers and coalitions throughout the Midwest. She has collaborated with law enforcement on programs directed toward preventing underage drinking and is a member of the Collaborative on Healthy Parenting in Primary Care. She has a B.A. in history and political science from North Central College and an M.H.S. in addiction studies from Governor’s State University.

Elizabeth Hawkins-Walsh is director of the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) Program at the Catholic University of America and is the assistant dean for master of science in nursing programs and outreach. Her current research interests focus on the development of curricular guidelines and outcomes for graduates of dual acute and primary care PNP programs. She has published extensively, most recently on the expanding role of the PNP in primary mental health care. Prior to coming to Catholic University, she worked as a pediatric nurse practitioner, in psychiatric nursing, and as a family liaison and research associate at Georgetown University’s Department of Pediatrics/Neonatology. She received her Ph.D. in behavior pediatrics from Catholic University.

Kimberly E. Hoagwood is vice chair for research in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. Her research portfolio focuses on child, adolescent, and family outcomes; parent engagement and activation; implementation science in policy contexts; and quality measurement. She also works with the Division of Child, Adolescent, and Family Services at the New York State Office of Mental Health. Prior to joining the NYU faculty, she was professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry at Columbia University and was associate director for child and adolescent mental health research in the Office of the Director at the National Institute of Mental Health. She has a Ph.D. in school psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Jeffrey Hunt is professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He is the program director for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship, the Combined Program

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

in Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Child Psychiatry (Triple Board) residency, and associate division director for education. He is also director of inpatient and intensive services and associate academic director at Bradley Hospital. He currently is cochair of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training and Education Committee and chair of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Maintenance of Certification Committee. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Carroll College of Montana and an M.S. in biology from Montana State University. He received an M.D. from the Medical College of Wisconsin and general and child and adolescent psychiatry training at the Medical College of Pennsylvania at the Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute.

Christen Johnson is a fourth-year medical student pursuing M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University. She is a Class of 2009 Gates Millennium Scholar and National Health Service Corps Scholar and was awarded the Distinguished Advanced Student Leader award and Dr. Martin Luther King Distinguished Service Award at Wright State University. She is currently an OhioHealth Physician Diversity Scholar and was a Dr. David E. Satcher MD PhD Research Fellow. She serves as president of the Student National Medical Association.

Parinda Khatri is chief clinical officer at Cherokee Health Systems. She provides oversight and guidance on clinical quality, program development and management, workforce development, clinical research, and clinical operations for blended primary care and behavioral health services within the organization. She also trains, consults, and presents extensively on integrated care, and she leads Cherokee’s psychology internship and postdoctoral fellowship programs. She is president of the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, cochair of the Behavioral Health Special Interest Group for the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative, and member of the Research Advisory Committee for the Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers for Health Disparities at Morehouse School of Medicine. She earned her doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral medicine at Duke University Medical Center.

V. Robyn Kinebrew, from Cincinnati, Ohio, has worked in the field of human resources. She and her husband are parents of a sophomore in high school and twin sons who are sophomores in college. She became their advocate when her twins were born with sickle cell disease and her youngest son had surgery at 3 days old. She is part of Team Sickle Cell for the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute. She is also a member of the patient and family engagement work-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

group of the six-state sickle cell network, Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest. She and her family are part of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Champion group, and she has represented Cincinnati Children’s Hospital at various events. The Kinebrews accompanied Cincinnati Children’s Hospital leaders to a briefing on Capitol Hill, where she spoke about sickle cell disease and advocated for the National Pediatric Research Network Act.

David J. Kolko is professor of psychiatry, psychology, pediatrics, and clinical and translational science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He directs Services for Kids In Primary-care, a treatment and research program designed to promote integrated pediatric health care. He also serves as adjunct staff in the Section of Behavioral Health at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. He is a fellow of Divisions 37, 53, and 56 of the American Psychological Association. His treatment research interests include promoting the integration and implementation of behavioral health services in pediatric primary care practices and family health centers, and evidence-based practices that target child abuse/family conflict, child behavior disorders/antisocial behavior, and adolescent sexual offending in child welfare and mental health settings. Specific areas of current interest include the testing of alternative models for capacity-building and professional training in collaborative care to advance the science of implementation. He is the senior developer of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Marshall Land, Jr., is a general pediatrician and the R. James McKay, Jr., MD Green & Gold professor of pediatrics at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Vermont Children’s Hospital. He was also in private practice for 40 years. He currently serves as consultant to the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) for strategic planning, maintenance of certification, communication, and testing. He is a past chair of the ABP Board of Directors, and has served on many board committees, including current work on the issues of behavioral and mental health for children. He has also participated on committees and projects for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has contributed to a number of publications on clinical training and certification and the promotion of children’s health. He graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and did his pediatric residency at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont.

Laurel K. Leslie is vice president of research at the American Board of Pediatrics. She is also professor of medicine, pediatrics, and community medicine and public health at Tufts University School of Medicine. A

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

developmental-behavioral pediatrician, she is committed to research that focuses on the identification and treatment of developmental and mental health needs of children and adolescents across the health, mental health, school, and child welfare sectors. She is particularly interested in mechanisms for linking research, policy, and practice to improve outcomes for children and adolescents. She also maintains an active interest in defining the future of pediatric practice and education. She received an M.D. from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine.

Mary Ann McCabe is associate clinical professor of pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine and affiliate faculty in applied developmental psychology at George Mason University. She is also a clinical psychologist and consultant in independent practice. She is past president of the Society for Child and Family Policy and Practice and a member of a task force on integrated care for the Society of Pediatric Psychology. She led the planning of two national interdisciplinary summits on child mental health, is chair of the APA Interdivisional Task Force for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, and is chair of the Consortium for Science-Based Information on Children, Youth and Families. Her areas of scholarship have included knowledge transfer across research, practice, and policy; promoting child mental health; and minors’ capacity for involvement in decision making about medical and mental health treatment and research. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the Catholic University of America.

Susan McDaniel is the Dr. Laurie Sands distinguished professor of psychiatry and family medicine, director of the Institute for the Family in Psychiatry, associate chair of the Department of Family Medicine, and director of the Physician Faculty Communication Coaching Program at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. She was the 2016 president of the American Psychological Association. She has been a pioneer integrating mental health into primary and specialty health care, and is known for her publications in the areas of behavioral health and primary care, genetic conditions and family dynamics, and doctor-patient communication.

Julia McMillan is professor (emerita) of the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She served as director of the pediatric residency program at Johns Hopkins and as associate dean for graduate medical education. She was a member of the Pediatrics Review Committee for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and served as chair of the board of directors of the American Board of Pediatrics. She currently chairs the board’s strategic planning committee, and in that capac-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

ity she is working to enhance pediatric residency and fellowship training in behavioral and mental health.

Bernadette Melnyk is the associate vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer, and professor and dean of the College of Nursing at Ohio State University. She also is a professor of pediatrics and psychiatry in Ohio State’s College of Medicine. She is editor of the journal Worldviews on Evidence-based Nursing and a board member of U.S. Healthiest, the National Guideline Clearinghouse, and the National Quality Measures Clearinghouse. She founded the National Interprofessional Education and Practice Collaborative and the National Consortium for Building Healthy Academic Communities. She has a B.S.N. from West Virginia University, M.S. with a specialization in nursing care of children and pediatric nurse practitioner from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Ph.D. in clinical research from the University of Rochester, where she also completed a postmaster’s certificate as a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

Benjamin F. Miller is an associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where he is director of the Eugene S. Farley, Jr., Health Policy Center. The Farley Center conducts policy studies relevant to particular health and health care challenges, disseminating evidence to those positioned to use it in decision making related to health policy for the university, and serves as a leader locally and nationally on a variety of topic areas. Under his leadership, the Farley Center has worked on four main areas: behavioral health and primary care integration, payment reform, workforce, and prevention.

Rebecca Mueller resides in Fall City, WA, with her husband Eric Mueller and two children, Bryce, age 13, and Vivian, age 12. They were first introduced to the Incredible Years (IY) Program after enrolling in a study on “parenting children with challenging behaviors” conducted by Carolyn Webster-Stratton and her team at the University of Washington Parenting Clinic. After successfully completing the 20-week program, the Muellers have continued to use the strategies and techniques learned through IY to manage their relationship with their son and to help him to use the behavioral techniques he learned to be successful at school and with peer relationships.

Marci Nielsen is the president and chief executive officer of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. Previous positions include vice chancellor for public affairs and associate professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center, executive director of the Kansas Health Policy Authority and the State Employee Health Plan, health lobbyist and assistant director

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

of legislation for the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), and legislative assistant to Senator Bob Kerrey (D-Nebraska). She served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Thailand and in the U.S. Army Reserves. She serves on the board of directors for the American Board of Family Medicine, National Academy for State Health Policy, and Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, and is a member of the National Quality Forum’s Measures Application Partnership (Clinical Workgroup). She received a B.S. from Briar Cliff College, an M.P.H. from George Washington University, and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

Lauren Raskin Ramos is the director of the Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development at the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Previously, she served as the director of programs at the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, where she was a member of the senior leadership team and oversaw the organization’s grant-funded work. She has also worked as the principal director for public health prevention and promotion programs at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health at Georgetown University on the Bright Futures Project, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She served as an officer of the Maternal and Child Health Section of the American Public Health Association and board member of the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. She received a B.A. in sociology and certificate in community health from Tufts University, and completed her M.P.H. at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health with a concentration in community health sciences.

Terry Stancin is professor of pediatrics, psychiatry, and psychological sciences at Case Western Reserve University. She serves as director of child and adolescent psychiatry and psychology, and vice-chair for research in psychiatry at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland. She is a board-certified child and adolescent clinical psychologist and is a fellow of APA Division 54. She has been a national advocate and expert in pediatric mental health issues in primary care settings for more than 30 years. She has authored more than 110 peer-reviewed scientific publications, 21 book chapters, more than 100 scientific presentations, and is a frequent invited speaker about integrated primary care.

Millie Sweeney is the deputy director for the Family-Run Executive Director Leadership Association, where she specializes in grant and program development, staff supervision and training, parent peer support and family engagement, curriculum development, and systems of care. Spanning the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

children’s mental health and child-serving systems, she has more than 20 years’ experience in navigating systems with and on behalf of families, advocating at both the individual and policy level, and building collaborations with professionals and systems. She operated as a member of the management team within a large statewide family organization and operated Family Solutions Consulting. She has leveraged her professional experience and experience as a parent to assist organizations and states with system of care and family-driven program development, consult on certification and support services, offer curriculum and training, and participate in policy-making groups as an advocate for family voice and choice in child-serving systems. She has an M.S. in clinical psychology from Mississippi State University.

José Szapocznik is professor of public health sciences, architecture, psychology, and educational research and counseling psychology at the University of Miami. He is chair (emeritus) of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and honorary founding director of the university’s Miami Clinical Translational Science Institute. His primary research focus has been the role of context on adolescent problem behavior, and the development and testing of family-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of drug abusing and problem behavior in Hispanic adolescents. With colleagues at the Center for Family Studies, he has conducted theoretical and empirical work testing some of the basic assumptions of family therapy. He developed a highly interdisciplinary program of research on the relationship between the built environment, behavior, psychological functioning, social processes, biomedical mediators, and physical health outcomes.

W. Douglas Tynan is a professor of pediatrics at Thomas Jefferson University and with the American Psychological Association, where he focuses on training mental health professionals to work in primary care settings on integrated health teams and assist with health behavior change. His work includes development and implementation of culturally sensitive evidence-based mental health programs in pediatric settings in high-need urban and rural locales, with evaluation and satisfaction components. At AI du Pont Children’s Hospital in Delaware, he directed a statewide program on child obesity prevention with work in medical settings, child care, and schools. In addition, he has been involved in the development of quality-of-care work in clinical initiatives regarding treatment of ADHD, child overweight, and developmental screening. He was one of the founding editors of the journal Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology and has served on state and federal committees for child care programs and Head Start.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

Deborah Klein Walker is vice president and senior fellow at Abt Associates. She has experience in the development of programs and system change, research, evaluation, policy analysis, and consulting. Before joining Abt, she was the associate commissioner for programs and prevention at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and a faculty member at the Harvard School of Public Health and Graduate School of Education. She is the current president of the Global Alliance for Behavioral Health and Social Justice, board member of Family Voices, and past president of the American Public Health Association and the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. She is the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, three books, and multiple commentaries. She has a B.A. degree in psychology from Mount Holyoke College and Ed.D. and Ed.M. degrees in human development from Harvard University.

Barbara Ward-Zimmerman is integrated care consultant and chair of the Connecticut Psychological Association’s Health Care Reform Task Force. She served as a collaboratively colocated psychologist in a pediatric practice and now advocates for administrative and financial system changes to facilitate integration. She is active in training on topics related to collaboration and primary care behavioral health. She also serves on state workgroups promoting the integration of children’s mental health screening and early intervention within the primary care setting and cochairs the Integrated Primary Care Committee of the American Psychological Association’s Society for Health Psychology. She completed doctoral studies at the University of Virginia and an internship at the Yale Child Study Center, and she participated in the inaugural launching of the Certificate Program in Primary Care Behavioral Health sponsored by the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Alison Whelan is chief medical education officer with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), leading AAMC initiatives to transform the current models of education and workforce preparation across the full continuum of medical education. She also directs AAMC efforts that support medical education officers, regional campuses, education researchers, students, and residents. Previously, she was a faculty member at Washington University School of Medicine and was associate dean for medical student education and senior associate dean for education. She coordinated the creation of the Practice of Medicine curriculum and led the planning for the school’s new education building and the creation of the Center for Interprofessional Education. She received a bachelor’s degree from Carleton College. She earned a medical degree from Washington University and completed postgraduate work and residency at the former Barnes Hospital, now Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×

Ellen-Marie Whelan is the chief population health officer for the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services and a senior advisor in the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation. In both positions she works on design, implementation, and testing of delivery system transformation and payment reform initiatives. Previously, she was associate director of health policy at the Center for American Progress and started her policy career in the U.S. Senate. Before working on Capitol Hill, she was a health services researcher and faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University. She has worked in a variety of primary care settings and started an adolescent primary care clinic in West Philadelphia. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University, a master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in primary care policy at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

Lisa de Saxe Zerden is the senior associate dean for Master of Social Work (MSW) education at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research interests are focused on health disparities in drug use and treatment and overdose prevention, HIV/AIDS, and the role of social workers in health care. She is currently involved in several interprofessional education opportunities within the Health Affairs schools at UNC at Chapel Hill. She has authored over two dozen peer-reviewed manuscripts, six book chapters, and numerous presentations at state and national conferences. She received an M.S.W. from University of California, Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in sociology and social work from Boston University School of Social Work.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve the Behavioral Health of Children, Youth, and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24877.
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Increasing numbers of evidence-based interventions have proven effective in preventing and treating behavioral disorders in children. However, the adoption of these interventions in the health care system and other systems that affect the lives of children has been slow. Moreover, with few exceptions, current training in many fields that involve the behavioral health of children falls short of meeting the needs that exist. In general, this training fails to recognize that behavioral health disorders are among the largest challenges in child health and that changing cognitive, affective, and behavioral health outcomes for children will require new and more integrated forms of care at a population level in the United States.

To examine the need for workforce development across the range of health care professions working with children and families, as well as to identify innovative training models and levers to enhance training, the Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health held a workshop in November 2016. Workshop panelists and participants discussed the needs for workforce development across the range of health care professions working with children, youth, and families, and identified innovative training models and levers for change to enhance training. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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