National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 8 Findings and Recommendations
Suggested Citation:"Epilogue." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Epilogue." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
×
Page 182

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Epilogue The Einstein quote that opens this report suggests that a tree and its branches serve as a metaphor for thinking about the integration of arts, engineering, humanities, mathematics, medicine, science, and technology because the vitality of the whole depends on the combined force of the parts. The trunk of the tree represents the core strength of the disciplines in higher education—the centralizing force that directs students through the course of academic study. Yet the branches—where Einstein located 181 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

182 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE religion, arts, and sciences—could also be seen as the locations for integra- tion, as they move away from the trunk yet remain integrally connected to the core strengths of the whole. Most importantly, the branches create opportunities for trees to connect to each other. In a forest, the canopy of intersecting branches connects distinct units. In this metaphor, it is the con- nections between branches and trunk (and roots), rather than the singular strength of any one part, that make the tree healthy and viable. The statue of Einstein on the grounds of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine faces the National Mall, not far from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Reflecting Pool. Immediately behind the statue is a small grove of trees, which pro- vide some shade in the summer (and backdrops to countless photographs of visitors sitting on Einstein’s lap). These trees provide a fitting image for this study of integration, for it is the connections between the flourishing branches, rather than the spindly trunks, that creates the canopy that pro- vides both shade in the summer and viability in poor weather. Thinking about integration as the connections between branches transforms Ein- stein’s metaphor—as well as the setting of his monument—into a meaning- ful guide for future action. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Next: References »
The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree Get This Book
×
Buy Prepub | $79.00 Buy Paperback | $70.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In the United States, broad study in an array of different disciplines —arts, humanities, science, mathematics, engineering— as well as an in-depth study within a special area of interest, have been defining characteristics of a higher education. But over time, in-depth study in a major discipline has come to dominate the curricula at many institutions. This evolution of the curriculum has been driven, in part, by increasing specialization in the academic disciplines. There is little doubt that disciplinary specialization has helped produce many of the achievement of the past century. Researchers in all academic disciplines have been able to delve more deeply into their areas of expertise, grappling with ever more specialized and fundamental problems.

Yet today, many leaders, scholars, parents, and students are asking whether higher education has moved too far from its integrative tradition towards an approach heavily rooted in disciplinary “silos”. These “silos” represent what many see as an artificial separation of academic disciplines. This study reflects a growing concern that the approach to higher education that favors disciplinary specialization is poorly calibrated to the challenges and opportunities of our time.

The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education examines the evidence behind the assertion that educational programs that mutually integrate learning experiences in the humanities and arts with science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) lead to improved educational and career outcomes for undergraduate and graduate students. It explores evidence regarding the value of integrating more STEMM curricula and labs into the academic programs of students majoring in the humanities and arts and evidence regarding the value of integrating curricula and experiences in the arts and humanities into college and university STEMM education programs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!