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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24988.
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Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHIES David J. Skorton Chair, (NAM) is the 13th Secretary of the Smithsonian. He assumed his position July 1, 2015. As Secretary, Skorton oversees 19 museums and galleries, 21 libraries, the National Zoo, and numerous research centers, including the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Smithsonian Environmen- tal Research Center. Skorton, a cardiologist, is the first physician to serve as Secretary. He previously was the president of Cornell University, a position he held beginning in July 2006. He was also a professor in the Depart- ments of Medicine and Pediatrics at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City and in Cornell’s Department of Biomedical Engineering at the College of Engineering. His research focus is congenital heart disease and cardiac imaging and image processing. Before becoming Cornell’s president, Skorton was president of the University of Iowa from 2003 to 2006 and a member of its faculty for 26 years. An ardent and nationally recognized supporter of the arts and humanities, Skorton has called for a national dialogue to emphasize the importance of funding for these disciplines. He asserts that supporting the arts and humanities is a wise investment in the future of the country. Skorton is a strong proponent of business–university partnerships. He has been active in innovation and economic development at the state and national levels to bring business and universities together toward diversifying regional economies. He is past chair of the Business- Higher Education Forum, an independent, nonprofit organization of indus- try CEOs, leaders of colleges and universities, and foundation executives. 199 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

200 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE Skorton was a pioneer in applying computer analysis and processing tech- niques to cardiac imaging; he has published two major texts and numerous articles, reviews and book chapters on cardiac imaging and image pro- cessing. Skorton was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (now the National Academy of Medicine) and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an elected member of the American Philosophical Society. A national leader in research ethics, he was the charter president of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs Inc., the first group organized specifically to accredit human research protection programs. Skorton is an avid amateur musician who plays the flute and the saxo- phone. He cohosted “As Night Falls—Latin Jazz,” a weekly program on the University of Iowa’s public FM radio station. He is currently a distinguished professor at Georgetown University. Skorton earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology and his M.D. both from Northwestern University. He com- pleted his medical residency and fellowship in cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Susan Albertine is senior scholar at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Beginning in 2008, she directed the LEAP States Initiative at AAC&U, dedicated to strengthening liberal and general education in public institutions and state systems, and served as vice presi- dent, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success. Albertine received her B.A. in english from Cornell University, her M.A. in english from SUNY Cortland, and her Ph.D. in english from the University of Chicago. She has served as co-leader of the Educated Citizen and Public Health initiative, a project co-sponsored by AAC&U, the Association for Preven- tion Teaching and Research, the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences, and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health. She was dean of the School of Culture and Society and professor of english at the College of New Jersey from 2002 to 2008. Previously, she served as vice provost for undergraduate studies, Temple University, and assistant to the provost, University of Pennsylvania. She has held faculty positions at the University of North Florida, St. Olaf College, and Susquehanna University. Her scholarship in American literature focuses on women’s work during the growth phase of industrialization in the United States. A former public school teacher, Albertine has supported pre-school through college align- ment through work with the Education Trust and the American Diploma Project. Her board service has included the Camden Academy Charter High School in Camden, New Jersey; the Advisory Board for the Delaware Study of Instructional Costs and Productivity—Faculty Study, University of Dela- ware; the Art Sanctuary, an African-American arts and letters organization PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 201 based in Philadelphia; the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences; and the National Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. 
 Norman Augustine (NAS/NAE) is retired chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Augustine attended Princeton University where he graduated with a B.S.E. in aeronautical engineering, magna cum laude, and an M.S.E. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi. In 1958 he joined the Douglas Aircraft Company in California where he worked as a research engineer, program manager and chief engineer. Begin- ning in 1965, he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense as assistant director of Defense Research and Engineering. He joined LTV Missiles and Space Company in 1970, serving as vice president, advanced programs and marketing. In 1973 he returned to the government as assistant secretary of the Army and in 1975 became under secretary of the Army, and later act- ing secretary of the Army. Joining Martin Marietta Corporation in 1977 as vice president of technical operations, he was elected as CEO in 1987 and chairman in 1988, having previously been president and COO. He served as president of Lockheed Martin Corporation upon the formation of that company in 1995, and became CEO later that year. He retired as chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin in August 1997, at which time he became a lecturer with the rank of professor on the faculty of Princeton University where he served until July 1999. Augustine served on the Presi- dent’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology under Democratic and Republican presidents and led the 1990 Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program and the 2005 National Academies com- mission that produced the landmark report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. Augustine has been presented the National Medal of Technology by the President of the United States and received the Joint Chiefs of Staff Distin- guished Public Service Award. He has five times received the Department of Defense’s highest civilian decoration, the Distinguished Service Medal. He is co-author of The Defense Revolution and Shakespeare in Charge and author of Augustine’s Laws and Augustine’s Travels. He holds 23 honor- ary degrees and was selected by Who’s Who in America and the Library of Congress as one of “Fifty Great Americans” on the occasion of Who’s Who’s fiftieth anniversary. He has traveled in over 100 countries and stood on both the North and South Poles of the Earth. Laurie Baefsky is executive director of ArtsEngine at the University of Mich- igan, and the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities—or “a2ru.” a2ru is a partnership of over 40 top-ranking research institutions commit- ted to increasing the production, investment, and integration of arts and design practice, research, curricula, and programming in higher education. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

202 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE In this capacity she works locally and nationally to support and strengthen the arts and integrative arts endeavors in higher education. Baefsky joined ArtsEngine and a2ru in August 2014 and has led arts integrated educational initiatives over the past 15 years. From 2007 to 2011 Baefsky established the USU ArtsBridge program at Utah State University, connecting university students with area schools and community organizations through arts- based interdisciplinary engaged learning initiatives. During this time, she also directed professional development efforts for northern Utah schools under the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program, working with this state-funded interdisciplinary public schools initiative as lead coordina- tor of professional development for Utah’s northern region schools. Within grantmaking, Baefsky served as grants manager for the Utah Division of Arts and Museums in Salt Lake City, UT where she oversaw the annual distribution of state and federal funding for individuals, orga- nizations, communities and educators. A skilled grant writer herself, her efforts have resulted in over $5.3 million in arts funding through grants from federal, state and private sources. From 2014 to 2018 Baefsky served as principal investigator on two successive Andrew W. Mellon Foundation- supported research initiatives at the University of Michigan, including “SPARC—Supporting Practice in the Arts, Research and Curricula.” In 2071 to 2018 she chaired a subcommittee reviewing the National Academy of Sciences’ Cultural Programs. Locally in southeastern Michigan Baefsky is on the Board of Trustees for the Ann Arbor Summer Festival, and member of the Cultural Leaders Forum of the Ann Arbor Arts Alliance. Baefsky also worked in multiple capacities with the Virginia Arts Festival in southeastern Virginia—as their education director, director of development research, and as a creative consultant. Baefsky began her career as a classical flutist and music educator, with degrees in flute performance from Stony Brook University, University of Michigan, and California State University, Fullerton. She has appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, Utah Symphony, New World Symphony, and as a tenured member of the Virginia Symphony for 15 seasons. As a chamber artist, her performances have ranged from Symphony Space and Cham- ber Music Society of Lincoln Center, NYC to northeastern Morocco and Umbria, Italy. Baefsky previously taught music and interdisciplinary courses for eight summers at the Virginia Governor’s School for the Humanities and Visual & Performing Arts at University of Richmond, and served as applied music faculty at multiple colleges and universities throughout southeastern Virginia. Kristin Boudreau is the Paris Fletcher Distinguished Professor of Humanities and head of the department of humanities and arts at Worcester Polytech- nic Institute. She has published three monographs, one edited collection, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 203 and dozens of essays on nineteenth-century American literature (some of them concerning pedagogical approaches), and has taught a wide array of literature courses for undergraduate and graduate students. In recent years she has turned her attention to transforming engineering education by con- textualizing engineering challenges in their historical, cultural, geographic and political settings; in this capacity she has been involved in WPI’s activities as a member of the KEEN network of engineering institutions. Recent publications in this field include “To See the World Anew: Learn- ing Engineering Through a Humanistic Lens” in Engineering Studies 2015 and “A Game-Based Approach to Information Literacy and Engineering in Context” (with Laura Hanlan) in Proceedings of the Frontiers in Education Conference 2015, several papers on integrative teaching in proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education. A classroom game she developed with students and colleagues at WPI, “Humanitarian Engineer- ing Past and Present: Worcester’s Sewage Problem at the Turn of the Twen- tieth Century” was chosen by the National Academy of Engineering as an “Exemplary Engineering Ethics Activity” that prepares students for “ethical practice, research, or leadership in engineering.” She is currently working with students and colleagues to develop role-playing games based on the Flint, Michigan water crisis. She is also pursuing NSF-funded research on the environment in engineering programs for LGBTQ+ students. Norman Bradburn is a senior fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago. He also serves as the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the faculties of the University of Chicago’s Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, Department of Psychol- ogy, Booth School of Business and the College. He is a former provost of the University (1984-1989), chairman of the Department of Behavioral Sci- ences (1973-1979), and associate dean of the Division of the Social Sciences (1971-1973). From 2000 to 2004 he was the assistant director for social, behavioral, and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation. Associated with NORC since 1961, he has been its director and president of its Board of Trustees. Bradburn has been at the forefront in developing theory and practice in the field of sample survey research in the cultural sector. He co-directs the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Humani- ties Indicators project and is principal investigator of the CPC’s Cultural Infrastructure project. For the Humanities Indicators project he oversees the collation and analysis of data, the creation of reliable benchmarks to guide future analysis of the humanities, and the development of a consistent and sustainable means of updating the data. For the Cultural Infrastructure project he oversees the systematic measurement of recent building projects and their consequences, modeling levels of creativity and sustainability of individual arts organizations before and after building projects, and the PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

204 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE overall cultural vibrancy and vitality of their cities or regions as a result. Bradburn is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the International Institute of Statistics. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. In 1996 he was named the first Wildenmann Guest Professor at the Zentrum for Umfragen, Methoden und Analyse in Mannheim, Germany. In 2004 he was given the Statistics Canada/American Statistical Association Waksberg Award in recognition of outstanding contributions to the theory and practice of survey methodology. Al Bunshaft is senior vice president of global affairs and workforce of the future for the Americas of Dassault Systèmes. In this role he is responsible for new business development, academic sales and relationships, and coor- dination of the company’s involvement in institutes and consortia. From 2013 to 2016, Bunshaft was president and CEO of Dassault Systèmes Government Solutions, the U.S. subsidiary he led the creation of, focused on serving U.S. government agencies. From 2010 until 2013, Bunshaft was Managing Director of Dassault Systèmes Americas. Prior to joining Das- sault Systèmes in 2010, he had a 25-year career at IBM, holding various executive roles in R&D, strategic initiatives and general management. Bun- shaft’s expertise in 3D visualization, computer graphics and engineering- related software tools has been a special focus of his career. Beginning with his post-graduate work at the National Science Foundation’s Center for Interactive Computer Graphics, he has led efforts to introduce new visual- ization-led processes into far-ranging industries. He is Dassault Systèmes’ leading voice for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States, where 3D visualization has been singled out by both the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health as a transformative technology. From 2014 to 2017, Bunshaft was co-chair of the STEM Innovation Task Force of STEMconnector, a diverse consortium of organizations concerned with STEM education and the future of human capital in the United States. He was named by the organization as one of it’s Top 100 CEO STEM leaders. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness, which advances a pro-growth policy agenda to U.S. government representatives. In addition, he serves on the Massachusetts Governor’s STEM Advisory Council and is a board member of the Massachusetts High Technology Council and the New York Hall of Science. He is a member of the President’s Council of the Olin College of Engineering and the Advisory Board of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY). He received his bachelor of science degree in computer science and mathematics from the University at Albany, SUNY. He has a master of sci- ence degree in computer engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 205 where he was a researcher at the Center for Interactive Computer Graph- ics, a university-industry research center operated in conjunction with the National Science Foundation. Gail Burd is the senior vice provost for academic affairs and a distinguished professor in molecular and cellular biology and cellular and molecular medicine at the University of Arizona. Burd was appointed the vice provost for academic affairs in August 2008. In this role, Burd works closely with campus leaders to coordinate programs that will advance the academic mis- sion of the university and help colleges and departments develop and assess their academic degree programs. Burd’s research program has focused on development and neural plasticity in the vertebrate olfactory system. She is the principal investigator on a successful research project on undergraduate STEM education funded by the Association of American Universities and the Leona and Harry A. Helmsley Charitable Trust, and her more recent research has centered around undergraduate science education. In prior administrative roles at the University of Arizona, Burd served as the associ- ate dean for academic affairs in the college of science, the interim depart- ment head of molecular and cellular biology, and the associate department head of molecular and cellular biology. A fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science, she has chaired several committees for national professional organizations, served on numerous government panels for the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, and received awards for her undergraduate teaching. Edward Derrick is an independent consultant on issues at the intersection of science, policy, and society, including research and innovation policy and management. He served as founding director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Center of Science, Policy & Society Programs from July 2011 to April 2017 after serving as deputy director then acting director of the AAAS Science and Policy Programs. The Center of Science, Policy & Society Programs bridges the science and engineering community on one side, and policy makers and the interested public on the other. The programs address an array of topics in science and society, including the interplay of science with religion, law, and human rights; they also connect scientists and policy makers through programs in sci- ence and government, including the S&T Policy Fellowship program; and help improve the conduct of research through peer review and discussion of standards of responsible conduct. As chief program director, Derrick oversaw the programs, which grew under his leadership to a staff of more than 50 and an annual budget of more than $20 million, and served as a member of senior management at AAAS. Derrick first joined AAAS in 1998 as a member of the AAAS Research Competitiveness Program (RCP). RCP PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

206 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE provides review and guidance to the science and innovation community. He became director of the program in January 2004, with responsibility for the development of new business and oversight of all aspects of the design and execution of projects. Derrick has participated directly in more than 60 RCP projects, having led committees to assist state and institutional planning for research, to review research centers and institutions and to advise state and international funds on major investments. Derrick is an honorary member of the National Academy of Inventors and an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow.  He holds the Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin, with a dissertation in theoretical particle physics, and the B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with an undergraduate thesis in biophysics. Between degrees, he worked for Ontario Hydro in the Nuclear Studies and Safety Division. E. Thomas Ewing is a history professor and associate dean of graduate studies, research, and diversity at the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences of Virginia Tech. His education includes a B.A. from Williams College and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Michigan. He teaches courses in Russian, European, Middle Eastern, and world history, gen- der/women’s history, and historical methods. His publications include, as author, Separate Schools: Gender, Policy, and Practice in the Postwar Soviet Union (2010) and The Teachers of Stalinism: Policy, Practice, and Power in Soviet Schools in the 1930s (2002); as editor, Revolution and Pedagogy: Transnational Perspectives on the Social Foundations of Education (2005); and as co-editor, with David Hicks, Education and the Great Depression: Lessons from a Global History (2006). His articles on Stalinist education have been published in Gender & History, American Educational Research Journal, Women’s History Review, History of Education Quarterly, Russian Review, and The Journal of Women’s History. He has received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Spencer Founda- tion, and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. J. Benjamin Hurlbut is associate professor of biology and society in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. He is trained in sci- ence and technology studies with a focus on the history of the modern biomedical and life sciences. His research lies at the intersection of science and technology studies, bioethics, and political theory. Hurlbut studies the changing relationships between science, politics, and law in the governance of biomedical research and innovation in the 20th and 21st centuries, examining the interplay of science and technology with shifting notions of democracy, religious and moral pluralism, and public reason. He is the author of Experiments in Democracy: Human Embryo Research and the Politics of Bioethics (Columbia University Press, 2017) and co-editor of PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 207 Perfecting Human Futures: Transhuman Visions and Technological Imagi- nations (Springer, 2016). He received an A.B. in classics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in the history of science from Harvard University. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the program on science, technology and society at Harvard. Pamela L. Jennings is recognized as a thought leader for integrative research, learning, and problem solving, through creativity and computa- tional thinking. She has developed, taught, advocated for and supported integrative learning and research across a range of educational institu- tions. Jennings is the CEO and chief imagineer of CONSTRUKTS, Inc., a consumer elec­ ronics company developing games for learning that connect t manipulatives for learning with computational thinking and interfaces for augmented reality. Jennings was the author of the 1999 Rockefeller Foun- dation report, “New Media Arts | New Funding Models.” She is a founding board member of the Nation of Makers, a grassroots organization carrying forth President Obama’s initiative on MAKING as a pathway for learning. J ­ ennings served as a program director at the National Science Foundation Computer & Information Science & Engineering directorate. She led the CreativeIT program and co-led the Human Centered Computing, Cyber- learning Transforming Education and Computer Research Infrastructure programs. As a champion of interdisciplinary research, Jennings convened stakeholders in the field to strategize about how to best support the plat- form. This included the 2010 “Strategies for Art + Science + Technology Research,” the first meeting held between the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her creative works are discussed in Creating Their Own Image: The History of African-American Women Artists” Oxford University Press and Struggles for Representation: African American Film/Video/New Media Makers, Indiana University Press. She curated the 2007 National Academies of Sciences exhibition “Speculative Data and the Creative Imaginary: shared visions between art and technol- ogy” as part of the ACM Creativity and Cognition Conference. She received her Ph.D. in human centered systems design at the University of Plymouth School of Computing, Electronics, and Mathematics as part of the Cen- ter for Advanced Inquiry in Integrative Arts; M.B.A. at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business; M.F.A. in computer art, School of Visual Arts; M.A. in studio art, International Center of Photography/New York University Program; and B.A. in psychology with conservatory studies in the Vocal Arts at Oberlin College. Youngmoo Kim is director of the Expressive and Creative Interaction Tech- nologies (ExCITe) Center and associate professor of electrical and com- puter engineering at Drexel University. His research group, the Music & PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

208 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE Entertainment Technology Laboratory (MET-lab), focuses on the machine understanding of audio, particularly for music information retrieval. Other areas of active research at MET-lab include human-machine interfaces and robotics for expressive interaction, analysis-synthesis of sound, and K-12 outreach for engineering, science, and mathematics education. Youngmoo also has extensive experience in music performance, including 8 years as a member of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the chorus of the Boston Sym- phony Orchestra. He is a former music director of the Stanford Fleet Street Singers and has performed in productions at American Musical Theater of San Jose and SpeakEasy Stage Company (Boston). He is a member of Opera Philadelphia’s newly formed American Repertoire Council. Youngmoo was named “Scientist of the Year” by the 2012 Philadelphia Geek Awards and was recently honored as a member of the Apple Distinguished Educator Class of 2013. He is recipient of Drexel’s 2012 Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He co-chaired the 2008 International Conference on Music Information Retrieval hosted at Drexel and was invited by the National Academy of Engineering to co-organize the “Engineering and Music” session for the 2010 Frontiers of Engineering conference. His research is supported by the National Science Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Robert Martello is associate dean for curriculum and academic programs and professor of the history of science and technology at Olin College. He has chaired and initiated efforts that re-imagined Olin’s faculty reap- pointment and promotion, institutional outreach, curricular innovation, and student assessment approaches. Martello’s NSF-sponsored research, engineering education publications, and faculty development workshops explore connections between interdisciplinary integration, faculty teaming, student motivation, and project-based learning. He has delivered educa- tional workshops for audiences around the world that include instructors and administrators at the K-12, community college, public, and private college levels. Martello implements his findings in experimental courses such as “The Stuff of History,” “Six Microbes that Changed the World,” “Paradigms, Predictions, and Joules,” and “Chemistry in Context.” A graduate of MIT’s program in the History and Social Study of Science and Technology, he is the author of Midnight Ride, Industrial Dawn: Paul Revere and the Growth of American Enterprise, a study of Revere’s multifaceted manufacturing career and of his many national impacts in pioneering America’s transition into the industrial age. He is now research- ing Benjamin Franklin’s printing and business endeavors, and he regularly lectures on Revere and Franklin, our “Founding Makers,” for audiences of all ages and backgrounds. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 209 Gunalan Nadarajan is dean and professor at the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design at the University of Michigan. His publications include Ambulations (2000), Construction Site (edited; 2004) and Contemporary Art in Singapore (co-authored; 2007), Place Studies in Art, Media, Sci- ence and Technology: Historical Investigations on the Sites and Migra- tion of Knowledge (co-edited; 2009), The Handbook of Visual Culture (co-edited; 2012) and more than 100 book chapters, catalogue essays, academic articles, and reviews. His writings have also been translated into 16 languages. He has curated many international exhibitions including Ambulations (Singapore, 1999), 180KG (Jogjakarta, 2002), media_city (Seoul, 2002), Negotiating Spaces (Auckland, 2004), DenseLocal (Mexico City, 2009) and Displacements (Beijing, 2914). He was contributing cura- tor for Documenta XI (Kassel, Germany, 2002) and the Singapore Biennale (2006) and served on the jury of a number of international exhibitions, including ISEA2004 (Helsinki / Talinn), transmediale 05 (Berlin), ISEA2006 (San Jose) and FutureEverything Festival (Manchester, 2009). He was artis- tic co-director of the Ogaki Biennale 2006, Japan, and artistic director of ISEA2008 (International Symposium on Electronic Art) in Singapore. He is active in the development of media arts internationally and has previ- ously served on the Board of Directors of the Inter Society for Electronic Art and is on the Advisory Boards of the Database of Virtual Art (­ ustria), A C ­ ellsbutton Festival (Indonesia) and Arts Future Book series (UK). He currently serves on the International Advisory Board of the ArtScience Museum in Singapore. In 2013, he was elected to serve on the Board of Directors of the College Art Association. He has also served as an advisor on creative aspects of digital culture to the UNESCO and the Smithsonian Institution. He continues to work on a National Science Foundation funded initiative to develop a national network for collaborative research, educa- tion, and creative practice between sciences, engineering, arts, and design. He is a member of several professional associations including Special Inter- est Group in Graphics and Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH), Associa- tion for Computing Machinery (ACM), College Art Association, National Council of University Research Administrators, International Association of Aesthetics, International Association of Philosophy and Literature, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2004, he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Art. He has served in a variety of academic roles in teaching, academic administration, and research for over two decades. Prior to joining University of Michigan, he was vice provost for research and dean of graduate studies at the Maryland Institute College of Arts. He also had previous appointments as associate dean for research and graduate studies at the College of Arts and Architecture, Pennsylvania State University, and dean of visual arts at the Lasalle College of the Arts, Singapore. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

210 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE Thomas F. Nelson Laird is an associate professor in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program and director of the Center for Postsecondary Research at Indiana University Bloomington. Nelson Laird received a B.A. in mathematics from Gustavus Adolphus College (1995), an M.S. in math- ematics from Michigan State University (1997), and a Ph.D. in higher edu- cation from the University of Michigan (2003). His work concentrates on improving teaching and learning at colleges and universities, with a special emphasis on the design, delivery, and effects of curricular experiences with diversity. He directs the activities of the Faculty Survey of Student Engage- ment, a companion project to the National Survey of Student Engagement, and the VALUE Institute, a collaboration with the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Author of many articles, chapters, and reports, Nelson Laird’s work has appeared in key scholarly and practitioner publi- cations. He also consults with institutions of higher education and related organizations on topics ranging from effective assessment practices to the inclusion of diversity into the curriculum. Lynn Pasquerella is president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Assuming the presidency of the Association of American Col- leges and Universities on July 1, 2016, throughout her career, Pasquerella has demonstrated a deep and abiding commitment to access to excellence in liberal education regardless of socioeconomic background. A philoso- pher, whose career has combined teaching and scholarship with local and global engagement, Pasquerella’s presidency of Mount Holyoke College was marked by a robust strategic planning process, outreach to local, regional, and international constituencies, and a commitment to a vibrant campus community. A graduate of Quinebaug Valley Community College, Mount Holyoke College, and Brown University, Pasquerella joined the Department of Philosophy at the University of Rhode Island in 1985, ris- ing rapidly through the ranks to the positions of vice provost for research, vice provost for academic affairs, and dean of the graduate school. In 2008, she was named Provost at the University of Hartford. In 2010, her alma mater appointed her the eighteenth president of Mount Holyoke College. Pasquerella has written extensively on medical ethics, metaphysics, public policy, and the philosophy of law. At the core of her career is a strong commitment to liberal education and inclusive excellence, manifested in service as senator and vice president of Phi Beta Kappa; her role as host of Northeast Public Radio’s The Academic Minute; and her public advocacy for access and affordability in higher education. Suzanna Rose is founding associate provost for the Office to Advance Women, Equity and Diversity and professor of psychology and women’s PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 211 and gender studies at Florida International University (FIU). Rose also is the lead investigator for FIU’s NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transforma- tion grant that is aimed at improving the recruitment, promotion, and retention of women and underrepresented minority faculty at FIU. A key research project associated with the grant includes the development of an evidence-based Bystander Intervention program to reduce gender and race bias in faculty hiring, promotion, and retention. Her previous administra- tive roles included serving at FIU within the College of Arts and Sciences as executive director of the School of Integrated Science and Humanity, senior associate dean for the sciences, chair of psychology, and director of women’s studies. Prior to that she served as women’s studies director and professor of psychology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Rose has published extensively on issues related to gender, race, and sexual orien- tation, including professional networks, career development, leadership, friendship, and personal relationships. She has consulted with many univer- sities both nationally and internationally concerning strategies for recruiting and retaining women faculty in science and engineering. Bonnie Thornton Dill is dean of the University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities and professor of women’s studies. A pioneering scholar studying the intersections of race, class, and gender in the United States with an emphasis on African American women, work, and families, T ­ hornton Dill’s scholarship has been reprinted in numerous collections and edited volumes. Her recent publications include an edited collection of essays on intersectionality with Ruth Zambrana titled Emerging Intersec- tions: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy, and Practice (Rutgers University Press, 2009), and numerous articles. Prior to assuming the posi- tion of dean, Thornton Dill chaired the Women’s Studies Department for 8 years. In addition, she has worked with colleagues to found two research centers that have been national leaders in developing and disseminating the body of scholarship that has come to be known by the term “intersection- ality.” Today she holds the title of founding director for both the Center for Research on Women at the University of Memphis and the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity at the University of Maryland. She was president of the National Women’s Studies Association (2010-2012) and prior to that was vice president of the American Sociological Association. Thornton Dill also serves as chair of the Advisory Board of Scholars for Ms. Magazine. Thornton Dill has won a number of prestigious awards including two awards for mentoring; the Jessie Bernard Award and the Dis- tinguished Contributions to Teaching Award both given by the American Sociological Association; the Eastern Sociological Society’s Robin Williams Jr. Distinguished Lectureship; and in 2009-2010, was appointed Stanley Kelley, Jr. Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching in the Department PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

212 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE of Sociology at Princeton University. Her current research pulls together her knowledge and experience as a teacher, mentor, and institution builder around issues of race/ethnicity, class, and gender in higher education to examine the experiences of historically underrepresented minority faculty in research universities, focusing specifically upon the impact of occupational stress on their physical and mental health and their career paths. Laura Vosejpka is the founding dean of the College of Sciences and Liberal Arts at Kettering University (former General Motors Institute) in Flint, Michigan. Besides being responsible for the basic science majors at Ketter- ing, she is also guiding an initiative to revamp the general education core for all engineers, providing a STEAM focused interdisciplinary approach to engineering education and she was a key player in bringing the Michigan Transfer Agreement for community college students to Kettering. Vosejpka came to Kettering after 6 years as a professor of physical science at Mid Michigan Community College (MMCC) in Harrison, Michigan. While at MMCC, she was an inaugural member of the Michigan Community Col- lege Association Leadership Academy, she served as chair of the General Education Committee and she was a co-leader for the college’s participation in the Michigan Community College Association Guided Pathways Initia- tive aimed at improving retention and completion rates for community college students. She was responsible for the physics, pre-engineering, non- majors science and organic chemistry curricula. Prior to joining MMCC, Vosejpka served as the executive communications director for global R&D for the Dow Chemical Company and was responsible for providing internal and external executive communications support for the chief technology officer and the R&D leadership team. Her earlier work at Dow as an R&D specialist in core R&D was in the areas of biocatalysis and electroactive organic polymers (pLED). She is the author of 6 internal Dow research reports and was awarded the 2002 Chemical Sciences Technical Award for her work on pLED polydispersity and lifetime relationships. Vosejpka held previous appointments at both Northwood University and Alma College. A passionate advocate for liberal arts education, Laura was a dual major in science and the humanities, graduating with Honors from The Ohio State University with BA degrees in both chemistry and english literature. She earned her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin – Madison in 1989 and then spent 18 months as a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Maryland. Lisa M. Wong is a musician, pediatrician, and past president of the L ­ ongwood Symphony Orchestra. She grew up in Honolulu, Hawaii where she attended Punahou School, an independent school centered on educa- tion, the arts and community service. She began the piano at age 4, violin at PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 213 age 8, guitar at age 10, and viola at age 40. Wong graduated from Harvard University in East Asian studies in 1979 and earned her M.D. from New York University’s School of Medicine in 1983. After completing her pediat- ric residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1986, she joined Milton Pediatrics Associates and is an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Wong is inspired by the work of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Dr. Albert Schweitzer, a humanitarian, theologian, musician, and physician. During her 20-year tenure as president of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra (LSO), was honored to work with remarkable ­ eaders l in health care and humanitarianism including Dr. Lachlan Forrow, Jackie Jenkins-Scott, Dr. Jim O’Connell and Dr. Paul Farmer. Although she retired as president of the LSO in 2012, Wong continues her involvement with the orchestra as a violinist in the section. A passionate arts education advocate, Wong has worked closely with the New England Conservatory of Music’s Preparatory School and traveled with NEC’s Youth Philharmonic Orchestra to Brazil, Cuba, Guatemala, Panama, and Venezuela as a pediatric chap- erone. Wong continues to be actively involved in El Sistema USA and has had the privilege of observing El Sistema in Venezuela several times over the past 10 years. Wong served as board member of Young Audiences of Massachusetts for more than 15 years and helped start Bring Back the Music (now renamed Making Music Matters), a program that revitalized in-class instrumental music instruction in the four Boston public elementary schools. In 2009, Wong was appointed to the Board of the Massachusetts Cultural Council by Governor Deval Patrick. In April 2010, Wong received the Community Pinnacle Award from Mattapan Community Health Center for LSO’s pivotal role in their capital campaign to build a new neighbor- hood healthcare facility. Her first book Scales to Scalpels: Doctors Who Practice the Healing Arts of Music and Medicine, co-written with Robert Viagas, was published in April 2012 by Pegasus Books. It was released as a paperback in May 2013 and was recently translated into Chinese. The audiobook version will be released in early 2014. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Ashley Bear is a program officer with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Before joining to the Academies, Bear was a presidential man- agement fellow with the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Biological Infrastructure in the Directorate for Biological Sciences, where she managed a portfolio of mid-scale investments in scientific infrastructure and led analyses of the impact of NSF funding on the career trajectories of postdoctoral researchers. During her fellowship years, Bear also worked as a science policy officer for the State Department’s Office of the Science and PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

214 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State, where she worked to promote science diplomacy and track emerging scientific trends with implications for foreign policy, managed programs to increase the scientific capacity of the State Department, and acted as the liaison to the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs and the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. Bear holds a Sc.B. in neuroscience from Brown University and a Ph.D. in ecol- ogy and evolutionary biology from Yale University. While working on her doctoral research one the developmental basis of courtship behavior in butterflies, Bear co-founded the Evolution Outreach Group, a volunteer organization composed of students and postdoctoral researchers that visit schools, museums, and camps in the greater New Haven, CT area to teach K-12 students about evolution through hands-on activities and demonstra- tions. Bear is passionate about science outreach to the public and about promoting diversity and inclusion in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Irene Ngun is a research associate with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineer- ing, and Medicine. She also serves as research associate for the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM), a standing committee of the National Academies. Before joining the National Acad- emies she was a congressional intern for the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology (Democratic Office) and served briefly in the office of Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas (D-33). Ngun received her M.A. from Yonsei Graduate School of International Studies (Seoul, South Korea), where she developed her interest in science policy. She received her B.A. from Goshen College in biochemistry/molecular biology and global economics. Austen Applegate is a senior program assistant with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to joining the National Academies he worked in a number of professional fields including international develop- ment, clinical research, and education. Mr. Applegate received his B.A. in psychology and sociology from Guilford College. There he developed his interest in social sciences and policy through his coursework in public health, health policy, behavioral medicine, qualitative and quantitative research methodology, race and gender disparities, and social science his- tory. Applegate plans to pursue a Master in Public Health in the future. Tom Rudin is the director of the Board on Higher Education and Work- force (BHEW) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 215 Medicine—a position he assumed in mid-August 2014. Prior to joining the Academies, Mr. Rudin served as senior vice president for career readi- ness and senior vice president for advocacy, government relations, and development at the College Board from 2006 to 2014. He was also vice president for government relations from 2004 to 2006 and executive direc- tor of grants planning and management from 1996 to 2004 at the College Board. Before joining the College Board, Rudin was a policy analyst at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. In 1991, Mr. Rudin taught courses in U.S. public policy, human rights, and organizational management as a visiting instructor at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. In the early 1980s, he directed the work of the Governor’s Task Force on Science and Technology for North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt, Jr., where he was involved in several new state initiatives, such as the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. He received a B.A. from Purdue University, and he holds master’s degrees in public administration and in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. JD Talasek is the director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (www.cpnas.org). Talasek is creator and moderator for a monthly salon called DASER (DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous) held at the NAS. He is currently on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University in the Museum Studies Master’s Program. Additionally, Talasek serves on the Contempo- rary Art and Science Committee (CASC) at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. He is the art advisor for Issues in Science and Technology Magazine and is currently the Art and Design Advisor for the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative based in Irvine, CA. Talasek is a board member of Leonardo/ International Society for Art Science and Technology and is chair of the Leonardo Education Arts Forum. He was the creator and organizer of two international online symposia (and coeditor of the subsequent published transcripts: Visual Culture + Bioscience (2009, DAP) and Visual Culture + Evolution (2010, DAP). Jay B. Labov is senior advisor for education and communication for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He has directed or contributed to 25 Academies reports focusing on undergradu- ate education, teacher education, advanced study for high school students, K-8 education, and international education. He has served as director of committees on K-12 and undergraduate science education, the Academies’ Teacher Advisory Council, and was deputy director for the Academy’s Cen- ter for Education. He directed a committee of the NAS and the Institute of Medicine that authored Science, Evolution, and Creationism and oversees PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

216 BRANCHES FROM THE SAME TREE the National Academy of Sciences’ efforts to confront challenges to teach- ing evolution in the nation’s public schools. He coordinates efforts at the Academies to work with professional societies and with state academies of science on education issues. He also oversees work on improving education in the life sciences under the aegis of the Academy’s Board on Life Sciences. Dr. Labov is an organismal biologist by training. Prior to accepting his position at the Academy in 1997, he spent 18 years on the biology faculty at Colby College (Maine). He is a Kellogg National Fellow, a fellow in Education of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow, and a 2013 recipient of the “Friend of Darwin” award from the National Center for Science Education. In 2013 he was elected to a three year term beginning in 2014 in which he served as chair-elect for 2014, chair for 2015 and past chair for 2016 of the Educa- tion Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2014 he was named a Lifetime Honorary Member by the National Association of Biology Teachers, that organization’s highest award and recognition. He received an Academies Staff Award for Lifetime Achieve- ment in December 2014 and was named by the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology as the John A. Moore Lecturer for 2016. Kellyann Jones-Jamtgaard is the career academy liaison at the Partnership for Regional Educational Preparation-Kansas City (PREP-KC), an education nonprofit that focuses on college and career preparation for urban school districts. Jones-Jamtgaard was a 2017 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow assigned to the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine at the National Academies of Sciences, Engi- neering, and Medicine. Appointed by Mayor Sly James, Jones-­amtgaard J currently serves as a commissioner on the Kansas City Health Commission, a group tasked with improving public health in Kansas City, MO, and co- chairs the Commission’s Birth Outcomes subcommittee. Jones-Jamtgaard holds a B.S. in biology and Spanish from Duke University and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC). Her doctoral research focused on alterations in cellular trafficking during Hepatitis C virus infection. During graduate school, Jones-­ amtgaard was a J member of the Committee for Postdocs and Students through the American Society for Cell Biology, co-chairing its career development subcommittee and serving as a liaison to the Public Policy and Minority Affairs commit- tees. Dr. Jones-Jamtgaard is committed to improving science education and being an advocate for women in science and medicine. She was recently rec- ognized with the naming of the Kellyann Jones-Jamtgaard Student Diversity Award at KUMC in her honor. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX I 217 Elizabeth Garbee was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies during the spring of 2018. She earned her Ph.D. in science policy from the Consortium for Science Policy and Out- comes (CSPO) at Arizona State University, having first earned a bachelor’s degree in astrophysics and classical civilizations from Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences. Her focus is higher education policy as it relates to sci- ence and technology, with additional expertise in risk perception, decision making, and public policy. Prior to joining the National Academies as a Mirzayan Fellow, she worked as a summer associate with the Science and Technology Policy Institute supporting tasks serving the Pentagon and the National Science Foundation. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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In the United States, broad study in an array of different disciplines —arts, humanities, science, mathematics, engineering— as well as an in-depth study within a special area of interest, have been defining characteristics of a higher education. But over time, in-depth study in a major discipline has come to dominate the curricula at many institutions. This evolution of the curriculum has been driven, in part, by increasing specialization in the academic disciplines. There is little doubt that disciplinary specialization has helped produce many of the achievement of the past century. Researchers in all academic disciplines have been able to delve more deeply into their areas of expertise, grappling with ever more specialized and fundamental problems.

Yet today, many leaders, scholars, parents, and students are asking whether higher education has moved too far from its integrative tradition towards an approach heavily rooted in disciplinary “silos”. These “silos” represent what many see as an artificial separation of academic disciplines. This study reflects a growing concern that the approach to higher education that favors disciplinary specialization is poorly calibrated to the challenges and opportunities of our time.

The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education examines the evidence behind the assertion that educational programs that mutually integrate learning experiences in the humanities and arts with science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) lead to improved educational and career outcomes for undergraduate and graduate students. It explores evidence regarding the value of integrating more STEMM curricula and labs into the academic programs of students majoring in the humanities and arts and evidence regarding the value of integrating curricula and experiences in the arts and humanities into college and university STEMM education programs.

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