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Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime (2018)

Chapter: Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
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– G –


Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Janet L. Lauritsen (chair) is Curators’ Distinguished professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri–St. Louis. Her research focuses on the causes and consequences of victimization, the social and historical contexts of crime and victimization, and quantitative research methodologies. Her most recent publications cover topics such as racial and ethnic disparities in risk for violence during the past four decades, gender inequality and violence against women, repeat victimization, and the relationship between changing economic conditions and violent victimization. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, and the National Institute of Justice. She currently serves as co-editor of the journal Criminology. At the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, she has previously served as a member of the Committee on Law and Justice, the Roundtable on Crime Trends, the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, and the Committee to Review Research on Police Policies and Practices. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Daniel B. Bibel retired in February 2015 as program manager of the Crime Reporting Unit of the Massachusetts State Police since 1992. Previously, he served as program manager of the Uniform Crime Reporting program for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Criminal History Systems Board and as director of the Massachusetts Committee on Criminal Justice’s Statistical Analysis Center. He has held adjunct faculty positions at the Northeastern

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

University School of Criminal Justice and at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. A two-time past president of the Association of State Uniform Crime Reporting Systems, he is currently a member of the Uniform Crime Reporting Subcommittee of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Advisory Policy Board, and served for nearly a decade on the Statewide Geographic Information Advisory Committee in Massachusetts. He holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Fairleigh Dickinson University and an M.S. degree in criminal justice from Northeastern University.

Jonathan P. Caulkins is H. Guyford Stever professor of operations research and public policy at the Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University. A member of the Carnegie Mellon faculty since 1990, he has taken leaves of absence to teach at the university’s campus in Doha, Qatar, to direct RAND’s Drug Policy Research Center, and to establish RAND’s Pittsburgh office. His research focuses on mathematical models of social policy problems and on specific policies in the area of drugs, crime, and delinquency. He has consulted with a wide variety of agencies and organizations, including the Central Intelligence Agency, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the United Kingdom Drug Policy Commission, and Westat. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2015. He is a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences and won the David Kershaw Award from the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. At the National Academies, he has served on the Committee on Increased Costs to the U.S. Department of Justice of Border Enforcement by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Committee on Reducing Tobacco Use, and the Committee on Immunotherapies for Treating Drug Addiction. He holds a bachelor’s degree in systems science and engineering, computer science, and engineering and policy and an M.S. degree in systems science and engineering, both from Washington University, and an S.M. degree in electrical engineering and computer science and a Ph.D. degree in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Daniel L. Cork (study director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT), currently serving as study director for this panel and for the Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Methods. He joined the CNSTAT staff in 2000 and has served as study director or program officer for several census-related panels, including the Panels on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Research on Future Census Methods (2010 Planning panel), Review of the 2000 Census, and Review of the 2010 Census. He also directed the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (in cooperation with the Committee on Law and Justice) and was senior program officer for the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database (joint with the Committee on Law

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

and Justice and the National Materials Advisory Board). His research interests include quantitative criminology, geographical analysis, Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He has a B.S. in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

Kim English is research director for the Division of Criminal Justice, within the Colorado Department of Public Safety, and director of the Colorado Statistical Analysis Center. In this capacity, she manages a staff of professional researchers engaged in a variety of criminal and juvenile justice research and policy analysis activities, providing research support, policy analysis, and program evaluation findings to the Colorado General Assembly, the governor’s office and the Colorado Criminal and Juvenile Justice Commission. She received the 1999 J. Paul Sylvestre Award from the Justice Research and Statistics Association and the Bureau of Justice Statistics for outstanding achievement in advancing criminal justice statistics in the states. She has consulted with the Council of State Governments, the National Governor’s Association, the National Association of State Legislatures, the National Institute of Corrections, the Center for Sex Offender Management, the American Probation and Parole Association, and criminal justice agencies in states across the country. She has an M.A. degree in sociology and criminology from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Robert M. Goerge is a senior research fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, where he also serves as director of the Joint Program on Public Policy and Computing at the Harris School for Public Policy Studies. His research focuses on improving available data on children and families, in particular those affected by violence or who require special services related to disability or poverty. He developed Chapin Hall’s Integrated Database on Child and Family Programs in Illinois, which combines data from educational, criminal/juvenile justice, employment, and healthcare programs with administrative data on receipt of social services. With NORC at the University of Chicago, he is also principal investigator of the National Survey of Early Care and Education. At the National Academies, he served on the Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs. He has a Ph.D. in social policy from the University of Chicago.

Nola M. Joyce retired in early 2016 after serving since February 2008 as deputy commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department. In that capacity, she headed the Office of Organizational Services, Strategy, and Innovations and led the departmental change management efforts for Commissioner Charles Ramsey. From 1998 to 2007, she performed similar duties with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

the Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.; previously, she spent 6 years as deputy director of the Chicago Police Department’s Research and Development Division, where she was particularly involved in implementing the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy model for community policing. For 11 years, she was manager of the research, planning, and budget divisions of the Illinois Department of Corrections. She received the Gary P. Hayes award in 2010 from the Police Executive Research Forum; she is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police Research Advisory Committee and the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Law Enforcement Futurist Group. She has two master’s degrees from Southern Illinois University—one in urban affairs and public policy and another in sociology with specialization in research methodology and statistics—and another master’s degree in homeland defense and security from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; she is also completing work in Temple University’s Ph.D. program in criminal justice.

James P. Lynch (consultant to the panel) is professor and chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. From June 2010 through his appointment at the University of Maryland, he served as director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Previously, he was distinguished professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. At the Bureau of Social Science Research in the 1980s, he served as manager of the National Crime Survey redesign effort for the bureau. He became a faculty member in the Department of Justice, Law, and Society at American University in 1986, where he remained as associate professor, full professor, and chair of the department until leaving for John Jay in 2005. He has published 3 books, 25 refereed articles, and over 40 book chapters and other publications. He was elected to the executive board of the American Society of Criminology in 2002 and has served on the editorial boards of Criminology and the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and as deputy editor of Justice Quarterly. He has also chaired the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Law and Justice Statistics. He was a member of the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, and currently serves on the Committee on Law and Justice and the Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

David McDowall is distinguished teaching professor of criminal justice at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and co-director of the Violence Research Group. Prior to joining the Albany faculty, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan and served on the faculties of the University at Buffalo and the University of Maryland. His research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

makes extensive use of quantitative methods and aggregate crime data. He has published on policy issues in juvenile justice and firearm violence, and on the nature and statistical properties of crime rate trends. From 2001–2008, he was editor-in-chief of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, and the Journal of Research on Crime and Delinquency. A fellow of the American Society of Criminology, he received the Criminology Teaching Award for career-length achievement from the society in 2011. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University.

Jennifer H. Madans was named associate director for science of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in May 1996, and is responsible for the overall plan and development of NCHS’s data collection and analysis programs. Her research concentrations include data collection methodology, measurement of health and functioning, and health services research; she was founding member and chair of the steering committees for three United Nations-sponsored initiatives to develop internationally comparable measures of disability and health. She has directed two major national longitudinal studies (the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Followup Study and the National Nursing Home Followup Study), and participated in the redesign of the National Health Interview Survey questionnaire. She has also served as adjunct associate professor in the Demography and Community and Family Medicine Departments at Georgetown University. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a past vice president of the International Association of Official Statistics. At the National Academies, she is currently a member of the Panel on Addressing Priority Technical Issues for the Next Decade of the American Community Survey; she previously served on the Committee to Develop Criteria for Evaluating the Outcomes of Approaches to Prevent and Treat Obesity and the steering committee for the Workshop on the Future of Federal Household Surveys. She has a B.A. degree from Bard College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Michael D. Maltz is professor emeritus of criminology, law, and justice and of information and decision sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago and senior research scientist and adjunct professor of sociology at the Criminal Justice Research Center at Ohio State University. A past editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, he was a visiting fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics from 1995 to 2000 and was formerly a staff member of the National Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (now the National Institute of Justice). His primary research interests have been on the validity of crime data, including routines for handling of missing data, and the capability for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

drawing useful inferences from those data through mathematical models and visualization techniques. His 1984 book Recidivism was awarded the Lanchester Prize of the Operations Research Society of America (later, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences). In 1996, he held a Fulbright Scholarship at El Colegio de Michoacán in Mexico. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Michael C. Miller has over 24 years of law enforcement experience where he has worked at the city, county, tribal, and federal levels. Currently, he is serving as assistant chief of police, administrative services, for the Coral Gables Police Department, Florida. Prior to joining the Coral Gables Police Department in early 2013 as administrative services director, he served in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for 6 years as the special assistant to the executive assistant director of the Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch and as the special assistant to the assistant director of the Directorate of Intelligence. He also served for 2 years as an FBI detailee to the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs as deputy associate director of law enforcement operations. Prior to joining the FBI, he spent 13 years as a management consulting executive where he held several increasingly responsible positions focusing on public safety and law enforcement. Most notably, he served for 3 years as the global program executive for Accenture’s Immigration, Justice and Public Safety practice. He also spent 11 years as regular and reserve deputy sheriff in Wise County, Texas, and 5 years as a reserve police officer in Addison, Texas. He holds a B.S. degree in biomedical science from Texas A&M University and an M.P.A. from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and has completed the executive program in Navigating Strategic Change at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.

James J. Nolan, III, is professor of sociology and criminology at West Virginia University where he teaches courses about crime and social control. His research currently focuses on police procedures, crime measurement, and hate crime. From 1980 to 1993, he worked in the Wilmington, Delaware, police department, starting as patrol officer and eventually serving as project director for the community-oriented policing part of the Weed and Seed Program, for which Wilmington was one of the original 16 sites. He also served as senior policy advisor to the Secretary of Public Safety in Delaware. He graduated from the FBI National Academy in 1992 and was chief of the Crime Analysis, Research, and Development Unit in the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) from 1995 to 2000, at which time he joined the West Virginia University faculty. During his tenure at CJIS, he provided management oversight for the National Hate Crime Data Collection Program. In 2010, he was named West Virginia’s Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Advancement and Support of Education. He is a past recipient of a grant to study statistical adjustments to police crime data from the American Statistical Association and the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Wilmington College and a M.Ed. and a Ph.D. in psychoeducational processes from Temple University.

Amy O’Hara joined the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research in July 2017. From 2014 until her move to Stanford, she was chief of the Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications (CARRA), which was then part of the research and methodology directorate at the U.S. Census Bureau. She began her career at the Census Bureau in 2004 as an economist/statistician in the Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division before shifting to CARRA in 2008. Among other accomplishments in attempting to integrate administrative records data into the full suite of Census Bureau processes, she led the 2010 Census Match Study—an unprecedented complete match/linkage of the full set of returns from the 2010 decennial census to a composite of administrative records data from 8 federal agencies, used to examine differences in coverage and possible sources of error in both sources. She received an Arthur S. Flemming Award, recognizing outstanding achievement and leadership in federal government service, from the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, George Washington University, in 2012. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Notre Dame.

John V. Pepper is professor of economics at the University of Virginia, where he has served on the faculty since 1996. His work examines identification problems that arise when evaluating a wide range of public policy questions including such subjects as health and disability programs, welfare policies (e.g., SNAP), and drug and crime policies. From 2001 to 2002, he served as study director of the National Academies’ Committee to Improve Research Information and Data on Firearms, culminating in the 2004 report Firearms and Violence: A Critical Review. He was a member of the Committee on Improving Evaluation of Anti-Crime Programs and served as consultant to other panels of the National Academies’ Committee on Law and Justice, most recently serving as co-editor with Daniel S. Nagin of Deterrence and the Death Penalty (2012), the report of a study panel of the same name. He holds a B.A. degree in quantitative economics from Tufts University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Alex R. Piquero is Ashbel Smith professor of criminology and associate dean for graduate programs in the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is also adjunct professor at the Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice, and Governance, Griffith University, Life

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Course Centre Fellow at the University of Queensland, and faculty affiliate, Center for Violence and Injury Prevention, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis. From 2008–2013 he was co-editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. Prior to arriving at UT-Dallas, he was on the faculties of Florida State University, University of Maryland, John Jay College of Criminal Justice/City University of New York, University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Temple University. He is a fellow of both the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and in 2014 was awarded The University of Texas Board of Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award. At the National Academies, he served on the Committee on Assessing the Research Program of the National Institute of Justice as well as The Panel on a Prioritized Plan to Implement a Developmental Approach in Juvenile Justice Reform. He holds B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in criminology from the University of Maryland.

Jeffrey L. Sedgwick is executive director of the Justice Research and Statistics Association in Washington, DC, the support and coordination arm of the Bureau of Justice Statistics–funded state Statistical Analysis Centers. Previously, he was co-founder and managing partner of Keswick Advisors, a statistical analysis and policy evaluation consulting firm in Richmond, Virginia. He was confirmed by the Senate as director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in March 2006. In January 2008, he was named acting assistant attorney general for the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) in addition to the BJS directorship; subsequently nominated in April as assistant attorney general for OJP, he was confirmed to the post in October 2008 and served in that capacity until the change in presidential administrations in January 2009. He has previously served from January 1984 to January 1985 as deputy director for data analysis at BJS. He is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he joined the faculty in 1977 and where he specialized in aspects of American government including public finance, criminal justice policy, and the role of the American presidency. He has also served as visiting instructor of leadership studies at the University of Richmond. He is the author of Law Enforcement Planning: The Limits of an Economic Approach (1984) and Deterring Criminals: Policymaking and the American Political Tradition (1980), and has directed or participated in several international programs, teaching and lecturing in Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan, Germany, Trinidad and Tobago, and other countries. He has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Kenyon College and a master’s degree in public administration and public policy and Ph.D. in government and public affairs from the University of Virginia.

Paul K. Wormeli (liaison member, Committee on Law and Justice, and consultant to the panel) is principal and innovation strategist at Wormeli Consulting, LLC,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

a technology consulting firm for public service agencies. He is executive director emeritus of the Integrated Justice Information Systems Institute, a nonprofit corporation in Ashburn, Virginia, formed to help state and local governments develop ways to share information among the disciplines engaged in law enforcement and the administration of justice. He has had a long career in the field of law enforcement and justice technology. He has been active in the development of software products, has managed system implementation for dozens of agencies throughout the world, and has managed national programs in support of law enforcement and criminal justice agencies. He was the first national project director of Project SEARCH, and was subsequently appointed as deputy administrator of the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration in the U.S. Department of Justice (a predecessor of the current Office of Justice Programs). He helped design the first mobile computing equipment sold in this country to law enforcement agencies. He managed the staff work and wrote much of the report for the Information Systems section in the report of the National Commission on Standards and Goals for Criminal Justice, which dealt with criminal justice information system standards. He has been an advisor to the White House on security and privacy, participated in the drafting of federal law on this topic, and was responsible for the development of numerous state plans to implement the federal and state laws on information system security and privacy. During his tenure in the Justice Department, he served on the President’s Committee on Drug Enforcement. He was also the first chairman of the Integrated Justice Information Systems Industry Working Group (IWG), a consortium of over 100 companies that was formed at the request of the U.S. Department of Justice to help facilitate the implementation of Integrated Justice Information Systems throughout the nation. At the National Academies, he is a current member of the Committee on Law and Justice. He holds a B.S. degree in electronics engineering from the University of New Mexico and an M.S. degree in engineering administration from George Washington University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
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To derive statistics about crime – to estimate its levels and trends, assess its costs to and impacts on society, and inform law enforcement approaches to prevent it - a conceptual framework for defining and thinking about crime is virtually a prerequisite. Developing and maintaining such a framework is no easy task, because the mechanics of crime are ever evolving and shifting: tied to shifts and development in technology, society, and legislation.

Interest in understanding crime surged in the 1920s, which proved to be a pivotal decade for the collection of nationwide crime statistics. Now established as a permanent agency, the Census Bureau commissioned the drafting of a manual for preparing crime statistics—intended for use by the police, corrections departments, and courts alike. The new manual sought to solve a perennial problem by suggesting a standard taxonomy of crime. Shortly after the Census Bureau issued its manual, the International Association of Chiefs of Police in convention adopted a resolution to create a Committee on Uniform Crime Records —to begin the process of describing what a national system of data on crimes known to the police might look like.

Report 1 performed a comprehensive reassessment of what is meant by crime in U.S. crime statistics and recommends a new classification of crime to organize measurement efforts. This second report examines methodological and implementation issues and presents a conceptual blueprint for modernizing crime statistics.

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