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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
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Appendix B
Planning Committee Biosketches

Dr. Shuyi S. Chen (Chair) is a Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. Her research interests include observations and modeling of the tropical atmosphere and the ocean with a focus on air-sea interaction from weather to subseasonal time scales, development of coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-land models, and prediction of extreme weather including hurricanes and winter storms, the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the upper ocean circulation and transport over the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Chen is a lead scientist for several major field campaigns including the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) in 2003-2004, Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) in 2011-2012, and the Convective Process Experiment (CPEX) in 2017. Dr. Chen received the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Group Achievement Award for tropical cloud systems and processes and is a member of the NASA Ocean Vector Wind and Precipitation Measurement Missions science teams. She was an editor of the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS’s) Weather and Forecasting. Currently she serves as the Vice Chair of the National Academies’ Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC), the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space (ESAS 2017) Steering Committee, and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Board of Trustees. Dr. Chen is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society. She received her Ph.D. in meteorology in 1990 from The Pennsylvania State University.

Dr. Thomas M. Baer is currently the Executive Director of the Stanford Photonics Research Center and the Center for Advances in Biomedical Measurement Science. He is an adjunct professor in the Applied Physics Department and an Associate Member of the Stem Cell Institute at Stanford University. Dr. Baer has made major contributions in the areas of biotechnology, quantum electronics, and laser applications and is listed as an inventor on more than 70 patents and has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. Laser systems that he developed have been flown in aircraft in the Antarctic, measuring atmospheric chemistry catalyzing the ozone hole and over Greenland to measure the height of the icecap. Presently his research is focused on developing imaging and analysis technology for exploring the molecular basis of human developmental biology, optogenetics, and protein engineering. He is also currently working with international scientific societies to develop new technology to enable global networks for environmental measurement and monitoring. Dr. Baer has founded several companies in Silicon Valley and was named Entrepreneur of the Year for Emerging Companies by the Silicon Valley Business Journal. Dr. Baer was the CEO, chairman, and founder of Arcturus Bioscience, a biotechnology company located in Mountain View, California, which he established in 1996. Dr. Baer was also co-founder and CEO of Auxogyn, Inc., a diagnostic company devoted to advancing women’s health by developing technology for assisted reproduction and in vitro fertilization, which he established in 2010. Dr. Baer graduated with a B.A. degree in physics magna cum

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×

laude from Lawrence University (1974) and received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atomic physics from The University of Chicago (1979). He is a fellow of the Optical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Dr. John J. Cassano is an Associate Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a Fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research involves the study of the meteorology and climate of both polar regions using regional climate models and numerical weather prediction models, in situ and remotely sensed observations, and various data analysis techniques. Dr. Cassano’s main areas of active research include regional climate modeling and model development, analysis of coupled climate system components, and numerical weather prediction. He received his B.S. from Montana State University, his M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and his Ph.D. from the University of Wyoming.

Dr. Jeannine Cavender-Bares is a Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at the University of Minnesota. Her lab is currently focused on using remote sensing tools to link aboveground functional attributes of plants and their diversity to belowground processes as part of a large-scale effort to remotely sense biodiversity and ecosystem processes. The unifying goal of her work is to understand how functional traits of plants link evolutionary history to current ecological processes with consequences for ecosystem function and stability on an increasingly human dominated planet. Her research program integrates levels of biological organization from cell and tissue function to ecosystem biology with a long-term goal of understanding the origins and organization of plant biodiversity and its consequences. In doing so, she brings together concepts and tools from physiological ecology, ecosystem ecology, evolutionary biology, and remote sensing. She received her Ph.D. in biological sciences at Harvard University, an M.E.S. from Yale University, and an A.B. from Cornell University. She is a Coordinating Lead Author on the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Americas Regional Assessment and is on the scientific advisory boards of BioDISCOVERY of Future Earth, the New Phytologist, and the Center for Tree Science at the Morton Arboretum.

Dr. Ruben Delgado is an Assistant Research Professor with the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). He holds a doctoral degree in chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico and is experienced in remote-sensing technology for air quality, wind energy, and meteorology applications. His interest and experience in active and passive remote sensing measurements has allowed him to participate in numerous field campaigns with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. He leads the UMBC Atmospheric Lidar Group. His research interests focus on the impact of meteorology on air quality; wind energy, as examined with the use of active and passive remote sensing techniques; and surface in situ measurements of gases and aerosols. Research areas include inversion algorithms, optical, chemical and physical properties of atmospheric

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×

aerosols, gases, and clouds; boundary layer dynamics (air quality and wind energy); continental and intercontinental plume transport to the Eastern United States and Caribbean; AOD-PM2.5 estimator development from ground and satellite observations and numerical weather forecast and global models; and new remote sensing technologies for atmospheric observations.

Dr. James B. Edson is a Senior Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Previously, he was a Professor and Head of the Department of Marine Science at the University of Connecticut. He received a B.S. in Physics from Dickinson College in 1984 and a Ph.D. in Meteorology from The Pennsylvania State University in 1989. Dr. Edson is a marine meteorologist conducting interdisciplinary research that investigates how the atmosphere and ocean interact (i.e., air-sea interactions). His specific research interests lie in boundary layer meteorology with a focus on the turbulent exchange (or flux) of momentum, heat, and mass (e.g., moisture and sea-spray) to and from the ocean surface. He is particularly interested in how waves affect the transfer of momentum and heat across the air-sea interface. He is perhaps best known for his ability to make difficult measurements at sea. This includes systems capable of directly measuring these fluxes from moving platforms that include ships, buoys, catamarans, and the R/P FLIP. He has also been actively involved in the development of new ocean observing systems such as the Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), its Air-Sea Interaction Tower (ASIT), and flux packages for the Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI). These investigations have led to the development of new measurement techniques, instrumentation, motion correction algorithms, flux parameterizations, drag and transfer coefficients, and models of evaporating sea-spray. Over longer time scales, he is involved with research aimed at improving the predictive capabilities of climate models by measuring and parameterizing the exchange of climatically important gases (e.g., CO2 and DMS) across the air-sea interface.

Dr. Patrick Heimbach is Associate Professor at The University of Texas at Austin and fellow of the W.A. “Tex” Moncrief, Jr., Chair III in Simulation-Based Engineering and Sciences. He is also visiting Associate Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on understanding the general circulation of the ocean and its role in the global climate system. As part of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) consortium that originated under the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP), he and his group are applying formal inverse modeling techniques for the purpose of fitting a state-of-the-art general circulation model with much of the available satellite and in situ observations to produce a best possible estimate of the time-evolving three-dimensional state over the past few decades of the global ocean and sea ice cover. ECCO products support global and regional ocean circulation and climate variability research on time scales of days to decades. Emerging research foci are understanding the dynamics of global and regional sea level change, the ocean’s role in Earth’s energy imbalance, the provision of formal uncertainties along with these estimates, and implications for improving the global ocean observing system for climate. Dr. Heimbach is also getting involved in investigating the polar ice sheets, their dynamics, their interaction with the ocean, and their contributions to sea level rise. Dr. Heimbach is a member of the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×

Academies’ Ocean Studies Board and the National Academies’ Committee on Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth’s Climate. He earned his Ph.D. in 1998 from the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and the University of Hamburg, Germany.

Dr. Petra Klein is a Professor in the School of Meteorology and Executive Associate Dean in the College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences at the University of Oklahoma. Her research interests include boundary layer meteorology, tropospheric pollution problems, flow and turbulence characteristics in urban areas, wind-tunnel modeling of geophysical flow phenomena, atmospheric measurement techniques, stable boundary layers, and low-level jets. She currently serves as Principal Investigator (PI) of a National Science Foundation (NSF) Collaborative Research grant that focuses on investigating the structure and evolution of low-level jets in the nocturnal stable boundary layer and their interactions with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances, and as a co-PI on the NSF-funded Perdigao Project that aims at studying multiscale flow interactions in complex terrain. She was also a co-PI on an NSF Major Research Instrumentation Program grant that focused on the development of the Collaborative Lower Atmosphere Profiling System (OU CLAMPS), served as co-PI on two Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (LABLEs) at the Southern Great Plains Site of the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program in Oklahoma, and received the NSF career award Innovative Laboratory for Research and Education in Urban Meteorology (ILREUM) that focused on the development of a laboratory for research and education in urban meteorology. She and her students frequently deploy remote sensing and in situ instruments to study the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and to investigate its impacts on air quality and wind energy resources. Dr. Klein served as a panel member on the National Academies’ Board of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate 2011 summer study: Committee on Urban Meteorology, is a member of the External Advisory Committee of The National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Earth Observatory Laboratory, the co-chair of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Board of Trustees, and was a member of the Program Organizing Committee for the 2017 NSF-sponsored community workshop on developing requirements for in situ and remote-sensing capabilities in convective and turbulent environments (C-RITE). Dr. Klein earned a diploma (1993) in physics and a Ph.D. in civil engineering (1999) from the University of Karlsruhe.

Dr. Jielun Sun is a Scientist III in the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Earth System Laboratory. Dr. Sun received her bachelor’s in meteorology from the Department of Geophysics, Peking (Beijing) University in China, and master’s of Philosophy and Ph.D. in meteorology from Yale University. Her research focuses on understanding physical processes in the planetary boundary layer and parameterizing atmospheric turbulence in numerical models by conducting and analyzing field experiment data. Her current research interests include fundamental turbulence transport theory, stable atmospheric boundary layers, turbulence parameterization over heterogeneous surfaces, trace gas transport over complex terrain, atmosphere-ecosystem interactions, and air-land interactions. She has participated in a number of field experiments. Her involvement in the field

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×

experiments include designing aircraft flight missions and instrument layouts on towers, and deploying instruments on the ground and on towers. She is an expert in analyzing observational data from towers and aircraft over a wide variety of surface types with an emphasis on understanding and parameterizing boundary layer processes over complex surfaces using measured data from various disciplinary areas.

Dr. Joao Teixeira is the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Science Team Leader and the Co-Director of the Center for Climate Sciences at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and supervises JPL’s Climate Physics Group. He received his licentiate and doctorate in physics from the University of Lisbon. Prior to joining the laboratory in early 2008, Dr. Teixeira was at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Undersea Research in La Spezia, Italy, the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, California, and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts near London, England. Dr. Teixeira’s research interests include the link between turbulence, clouds, and climate, and the use of models and observations to better understand the interactions between Earth’s climate system and small-scale processes, such as turbulence, convection, and clouds. He has developed new methods to represent turbulence and clouds, and has played a key role in developing new approaches for evaluating climate models using satellite observations. He serves on several international committees that address climate related issues.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. The Future of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observing, Understanding, and Modeling: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25138.
×
Page 40
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Improved observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (BL) and its interactions with the ocean, land, and ice surfaces have great potential to advance science on a number of fronts, from improving forecasts of severe storms and air quality to constraining estimates of trace gas emissions and transport. Understanding the BL is a crucial component of model advancements, and increased societal demands for extended weather impact forecasts (from hours to months and beyond) highlight the need to advance Earth system modeling and prediction. New observing technologies and approaches (including in situ and ground-based, airborne, and satellite remote sensing) have the potential to radically increase the density of observations and allow new types of variables to be measured within the BL, which will have broad scientific and societal benefits.

In October 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the future of BL observations and their role in improving modeling and forecasting capabilities. Workshop participants discussed the science and applications drivers for BL observation, emerging technology to improve observation capabilities, and strategies for the future. This publication summarizes presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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