National Academies Press: OpenBook

An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science (2018)

Chapter: Appendix C Acronyms

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
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C

Acronyms

2D

two dimensional

3D

three dimensional

AAAS

American Association for the Advancement of Science

AGS

alternating gradient synchrotron

ALICE

A Large Ion Collider Experiment

APS

American Physical Society

ATLAS

A Toroidal LHC Apparatus

BNL

Brookhaven National Laboratory

BRAHMS

Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometers Experiment

Caltech

California Institute of Technology

CBETA

Cornell-BNL ERL Test Accelerator

CDR

critical design review

CEBAF

Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

CeC

coherent electron cooling

CERN

European Organization for Nuclear Research

CHESS

Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source

CMS

Compact Muon Solenoid

COLDEX

Cold Bore Experiment

COMPASS

Common Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
CW

continuous wave

DESY

Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (German Electron Synchrotron)

DIS

deep-inelastic scattering

DOE

Department of Energy

EBIS

Electron Beam Ionization Source

EIC

electron-ion collider

EMC

European Muon Collaboration

EPS

European Physics Society

ERL

energy recovery linac

FAIR

Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe

FCC

Future Circular Collider

FEL

free-electron laser

FRIB

Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

GPD

generalized parton distributions

GSI

GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (formerly Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung)

HE-LHC

High-Energy Large Hadron Collider

HEPL

Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory

HEPP

High Energy Particle Physics

HERA

Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator

HERMES

HERA Measurement of Spin

HIAF

High Intensity Heavy-Ion Accelerator Facility

HL-LHC

High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

IBS

intra-beam scattering

ILC

International Linear Collider

IP

interaction point

IPAC

International Particle Accelerator Conference

IR

interaction region

JINR

Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

JLab

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

JLEIC

Jefferson Laboratory Electron Ion Collider

J-PARC

Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
KEK

High Energy Accelerator Research Organization

KEKB

High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (B-factory)

LBNL

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

LEP

Large Electron Positron Collider

LHC

Large Hadron Collider

LHeC

Large Hadron-Electron Collider

LQCD

lattice quantum chromodynamics

MAPS

monolithic active pixel sensor

MBI

microbunching instability

MIT

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MPD

multipurpose detector

MRI

magnetic resonance imaging

MSU

Michigan State University

NAS

National Academy of Sciences

NICA

Nuclotron-Based Ion Collider Facility

NS

nonscaling

NSAC

Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

NSF

National Science Foundation

NuPECC

Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee

ODU

Old Dominion University

PANDA

Anti-Proton Annihilations at Darmstadt

PDF

parton distribution function

PEP

Positron Electron Project

PHENIX

Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment

PHOBOS

One of two detectors at RHIC to measure Au ion collisions

PID

particle identification

QCD

quantum chromodynamics

Q-WEAK

Experiment to determine the weak charges of the quarks through parity violating electron scattering

R&D

research and development

RF

radio frequency

RHIC

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

RIKEN

Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
SIDIS

semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

SLAC

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

SPS

Super Proton Synchrotron

SRF

superconducting radio-frequency

STAR

Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

TMD

transverse momentum-dependent distributions

TPC

time projection chamber

USPAS

U.S. Particle Accelerator School

ZEUS

Detector at HERA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25171.
×
Page 138
An Assessment of U.S.-Based Electron-Ion Collider Science Get This Book
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Understanding of protons and neutrons, or “nucleons”—the building blocks of atomic nuclei—has advanced dramatically, both theoretically and experimentally, in the past half century. A central goal of modern nuclear physics is to understand the structure of the proton and neutron directly from the dynamics of their quarks and gluons governed by the theory of their interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and how nuclear interactions between protons and neutrons emerge from these dynamics. With deeper understanding of the quark-gluon structure of matter, scientists are poised to reach a deeper picture of these building blocks, and atomic nuclei themselves, as collective many-body systems with new emergent behavior.

The development of a U.S. domestic electron-ion collider (EIC) facility has the potential to answer questions that are central to completing an understanding of atoms and integral to the agenda of nuclear physics today. This study assesses the merits and significance of the science that could be addressed by an EIC, and its importance to nuclear physics in particular and to the physical sciences in general. It evaluates the significance of the science that would be enabled by the construction of an EIC, its benefits to U.S. leadership in nuclear physics, and the benefits to other fields of science of a U.S.-based EIC.

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