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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Speaker Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25372.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B Workshop Speaker Biographies Amesh Adalja, M.D., is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security. He also serves on the City of Pittsburgh’s HIV Commission and on the advisory group of AIDS Free Pittsburgh. He is board certified in internal medicine, emergency medicine, infectious diseases, and critical care medicine. Dr. Adalja is currently a member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s (IDSA’s) Diagnostics Committee and its Preci­ sion Medicine Working Group, as well as one of its media spokespersons; he previously served on its public health committee. He is also a member of the American College of Emergency ­ hysicians ­ ennsylvania Chapter’s EMS P P & Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Committee as well as the Allegheny ­ County Medical Reserve Corps. He was formerly a member of the National Quality Forum’s Infectious Disease Standing Committee, where he currently is an expert reviewer, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Ser­ vices’ National Disaster Medical System, through which he was deployed to Haiti after the 2010 earthquake; he was also selected for its mobile acute care strike team. He has served on U.S. government panels tasked with developing guidelines for the treatment of botulism and anthrax in mass casualty settings and the system of care for infectious disease emergencies and as an external adviser to New York City Health and Hospital Emer­ gency Management Highly Infectious Disease training program, as well as a FEMA working group on nuclear disaster recovery. Dr. Adalja is an asso­ ciate editor of the journal Health Security. He was a contributing author for the Handbook of Bioterrorism and Disaster Medicine and is also a contributing author to the upcoming edition of Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple. He has published in such journals as the New England 171 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

172 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Infectious Diseases, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Emerging Infectious Diseases, and the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Adalja is a fellow of IDSA, the American College of Physi­ cians, and the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is a member of various medical societies, including the American Medical Association, the HIV Medicine Association, and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Adalja completed two fellowships at the University of Pittsburgh—one in infectious diseases, for which he served as chief fellow, and one in critical care medicine. He completed a combined residency in internal medicine and emergency medicine at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, where he ­ served as chief resident and as a member of the infection control committee. He was a clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine from 2010 through 2017. He is a graduate of the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, and he obtained a bachelor of science degree in industrial management from Carnegie Mellon Univer­ sity. Dr. Adalja is a native of Butler, Pennsylvania, and actively practices infectious disease, critical care, and emergency medicine in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Steven Adams, M.P.H., is the deputy director of the Division of Strate­ gic National Stockpile at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Mr. Adams has served CDC in a variety of leadership roles, includ­ ing his current position since the inception of the Strategic National Stock­ pile in 1999. He has helped lead the organization’s growth to what is now a $7 billion national response asset and has directly engaged with state and local authorities in their preparedness and response efforts to large-scale public health emergencies. Mr. Adams also represents CDC in collaboration with the World Health Organization, other United Nations agencies, and private-sector partners and leads an international technical assistance effort to assist high-priority countries in Africa develop their response capabilities to public health threats such as Ebola and pandemic influenza. He holds a master’s degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a program certificate from Harvard’s National Prepared­ ness Leadership Initiative. Daniel Barnett, M.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he has a joint appointment in the Depart­ ment of Health Policy and Management and is on the core faculty of the Office of Public Health Practice & Training. His research interests include evidence-based approaches to organizational enhancement of public health emergency preparedness. He is a member of the National Council on Radia­ ion Protection and Measurements. Dr. Barnett previously worked at t PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 173 Baltimore City Health Department’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, where he conducted disaster preparedness training activi­ ties for the department’s workers. He received his M.D. at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health; his M.P.H. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and he is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins General Preventive Medicine Residency Program. Hamilton Bean, Ph.D., M.B.A., APR, is associate professor in the Depart­ ment of Communication at the University of Colorado Denver. He currently serves as director of the University of Colorado Denver’s International Studies Program. He specializes in the study of communication and secu­ rity. Since 2005, he has been affiliated with the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism—a U.S. Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence. His research has been published in numerous international academic journals and edited volumes, and his wireless emergency alerts-related research collaborations appear in the Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, Environment & Behav- ior, Public Relations Review, and Review of Communication. Amanda Bettencourt, M.S.N., is a predoctoral fellow at the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia (Penn). As a pediatric clinical nurse special­ ist, her focus is on achieving the best possible outcomes for hospitalized children. Her current doctoral research at Penn examines the relationship between nursing (e.g., nurse staffing, work environment, education level) and patient outcomes. As a clinical nurse specialist, she helped ensure high- quality nursing care and optimal outcomes for adult and pediatric burn and trauma patients at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota, and at UF ­ Health Shands Hospital in ­ ainesville, Florida. Ms. Bettencourt was also G previously the nurse manager for acute care services at Shriners Hospitals for Children–Boston, where she led an interprofessional team of pediatric burn clinicians. Additional affiliations include the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Society of Critical Care Medicine and Sigma Theta Tau. Recently, Ms. Bettencourt was elected to the board of directors at the ­ American Association of Critical Care Nurses. She serves on the American Burn Association’s Organization and Delivery of Burn Care Committee and is national faculty for the Advanced Burn Life Support Course. Her current publications are in the areas of nursing and patient safety, burn care, and pediatric delirium. Ms. ­ ettencourt earned a bachelor of science in exercise B science from the University of Florida, an accelerated bachelor of science in nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a master of science in nursing from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. She will complete a Ph.D. fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in spring 2019. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

174 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Brooke Buddemeier, M.S., CHP, is a certified health physicist (radiation safety specialist) in the global security directorate of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). He supports the Risk and Consequence Management Division in its efforts to evaluate the potential risk and conse­ quence of radiological and nuclear terrorism. LLNL does this by providing expert technical information in nuclear threat assessment, nuclear incident response, and forensics and attribution. Mr. Buddemeier is a council mem­ ber of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and on the scientific committees that developed Commentary No. 19, Key Elements of Preparing Emergency Responders for Nuclear and Radiological Terrorism (2005), and NCRP Report #165, Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers (2010). Mr. Buddemeier is an active member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and member of the HPS Homeland Security Committee. From 2003 through 2007, Mr. Buddemeier was on assignment with the U.S. Depart­ ment of Homeland Security (DHS) as the weapon of mass destruction emergency response and consequence management program manager for Science and Technology’s emergency preparedness and response portfolio. He supported FEMA and DHS’s Operations Center as a radiological emer­ gency response subject-matter expert. He also facilitated the department’s research, development, test, and evaluation process to improve emergency response through better capabilities, protocols, and standards. Before mov­ ing to DHS, he was part of LLNL’s Nuclear Counterterrorism Program and coordinated LLNL’s involvement in the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) for California, Hawaii, and Nevada. RAP is a national emergency response resource that assists federal, state, and local authorities in the event of a radiological incident. As part of RAP’s outreach efforts, Mr. Buddemeier has provided radiological responder training and instrumentation workshops to police, firefighters, and members of other agencies throughout the nation. He has also trained radiological emergency responders on the use of special­ ized radiological response equipment throughout the United States and in ­ Kazakhstan. Mr. Buddemeier has also provided operational health ­ hysics p support for various radiochemistry, plutonium handling, accelerator, and dosimetry operations at LLNL for more than 15 years and has been work­ ing on emergency response issues for more than 10 years. He has par­ ticipated in radiological emergency responses and exercises throughout the world. Mr. Buddemeier is a certified health physicist through the American Board of Health Physics (2000). He holds an M.S. in radiological health physics from San Jose State University (1997) and a B.S. in nuclear engi­ neering from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1987). PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 175 Cullen Case, Jr., EMPA, CEM, CBCP, CHEP, is the program manager for the Radiation Injury Treatment Network, where he leads the prepared­ ness activities of 80 hospitals, blood donor centers, and cord blood banks preparing for the medical surge from a radiological incident. As the senior manager of logistics and emergency preparedness for the National Marrow ­ Donor Program, he is responsible for the delivery of cellular therapy/ marrow worldwide, organizational preparedness, crisis response, business continuity, and the exercising of plans. While in the U.S. Army he managed the logistical responses to Hurricanes Bertha and Fran in North Carolina (1996) and Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua (1998). Mary Casey-Lockyer, M.H.S., CCRN, is currently the senior associate for Disaster Health Services at the national headquarters of the American Red Cross. For more than 6 years, she has fulfilled this role for program devel­ opment and continuous quality improvement for Disaster Health Services at national headquarters. As a Disaster Health Services manager/chief with the Red Cross, she has been on 17 national deployments, most recently to the 2017 Florida Hurricane Irma response plus supporting response operations in California, Nevada, Puerto Rico, Texas, and the U.S. Virgin Islands from the Red Cross national headquarters’ Disaster Operations Coordination Center. Mary continues to act as the Red Cross liaison to the Secretary’s Operations Center at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and serves on the board of Healthcare Ready. She has published many articles, most recently “Disability Integration Throughout ­ the Disaster Cycle of Prepare, Respond and Recover” in the Journal of ­ Business Continuity and Emergency Planning, spring 2017. Michael J. Consuelos, M.D., M.B.A., FAAP, is the senior vice president for clinical integration at The Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania (HAP). He is the executive leader responsible for HAP’s emer­ gency preparedness programs. He also supports member organizations in their quality and patient safety collaboratives, physician leader engagement, health care data analytics, value-based purchasing, and progress toward population health management. Dr. Consuelos has more than 20 years of clinical integration and physician leadership experience. He has led health system capital planning, strategic business ventures, physician compensa­ tion plans, and community pandemic and mass casualty preparations. More recently, he has focused on population health management and developing physician compensation models that advance value-based care systems. His experience in emergency preparedness began during his service in the U.S. Army. In his last assignment, Dr. Consuelos was the chief of medicine at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox. His leadership duties included mass casualty and biochemical response at Fort Knox and Army PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

176 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Reserve clinics in three other states. He also led the 2009 H1N1 pan­ demic preparations and coordinated community response for Lehigh Valley Health Network. Dr. Consuelos holds a bachelor of arts in psychology with high honors from Princeton University and a doctor of medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He completed his pediatric training at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He is a board-certified pediatrician and a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Consuelos received his executive M.B.A. from the Pennsylvania State University Smeal College of Business. Mary Pat Couig, Ph.D., M.P.H., received a bachelor of science in nursing from Fitchburg State University, a master of public health degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a doctor of philoso­ phy degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Prior to her retirement in 2006, she served as the chief nurse officer of the U.S. Public Health Service. During her tenure as chief nurse officer, she collaborated with the Federal Nursing Services Council (Air Force, Army, Navy, PHS, Veteran’s Health Administration, and the American Red Cross) and local, state, national, and international colleagues on strengthening nursing’s role and preparation for public health preparedness. Currently she is a program manager for emergency management in the Office of Nursing Services, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. John Crapo, M.S., M.Sc., CHP, is a deputy program manager within the Office of Nuclear Incident Response at the National Nuclear Security Ad­ ministration. In that capacity, he manages the atmospheric modeling, aerial radiation measurements, and radiation emergency medicine portfolios for the office. He also serves as a federal team leader for teams deployed in re­ sponse to a radiological or nuclear incident. Prior to his current assignment, he was the associate director for national security at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. Mr. Crapo is a retired naval officer and is certified in the comprehensive practice of health physics by the American Board of Health Physics. Baruch Fischhoff, Ph.D., is Howard Heinz University Professor, Depart­ ment of Engineering and Public Policy and Institute for Politics and Strat­ egy, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). A graduate of the Detroit Public Schools, he holds a B.S. (mathematics, psychology) from Wayne State Uni­ versity and a Ph.D. (psychology) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the National Academy of Medicine. He is past president of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making and of the Society for Risk Analysis. He has chaired the Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 177 and been a member of the Eugene (Oregon) Commission on the Rights of Women, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technol­ ogy Advisory Committee, and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Sci­ entific Advisory Board, where he chaired the Homeland Security Advisory Committee. He has received the American Psychological Association (APA) Award for Distinguished Contribution to Psychology, CMU’s Ryan Award for Teaching, an honorary doctorate of humanities from Lund University, and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. He is a fellow of APA, the Associa­ tion for Psychological Science, Society of Experimental Psychologists, and Society for Risk Analysis. His books include Acceptable Risk, Risk: A Very Short Introduction, Judgment and Decision Making, A Two-State Solution in the Middle East, Counting Civilian Casualties, and Communicating Risks and Benefits. He has co-chaired three National Academies colloquia on the science of science communication. Regina Hawkins, M.P.H., is a senior analyst for preparedness at the Asso­ ciation of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO). She leads the Directors of Public Health Preparedness peer network and the National Alli­ ance for Radiation Readiness. Ms. Hawkins assists state health departments in the formulation of policy decisions and efforts to develop preparedness plans. Prior to joining ASTHO, she worked as an intern for the National Association of County & City Health Officials. Ms. Hawkins holds a bach­ elor of science in applied science in public health from Youngstown State University and a master of public health from Saint Louis University, where she concentrated in biosecurity and disaster preparedness and environ­ ental m and occupational health. James J. James, M.D., Ph.D., M.H.A., serves as the executive director of the Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health and editor in chief of Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. Dr. James is board certified in general preventive medicine, earned a doctorate in medicine at the Cincinnati College of Medicine, a doctorate in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health, and a ­ aster’s in health care administration from Baylor University. Previously, he m was director of the American Medical Association Center for Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response, which oversaw the development and deployment of the National Disaster Life Support suite of courses (more than 110,000 medical and public health personnel trained) as well as other innovative mass casualty developments such as the health security smart card and the Citizen Ready preparedness and recovery training modules. Dr. James has served on many federal and private boards and committees in major policy and research functions in disaster medicine and public health. Dr. James served 26 years with the U.S. Army Medical Department, servic­ PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

178 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT ing in a multitude of capacities. His last assignment was as the command­ ing general of William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas. Upon retirement in 1997, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, the military’s highest peacetime honor. He went on to join FHC Options in Norfolk, Virginia, where he oversaw the building and management of the FHC Options team responsible for winning several multi-billion-dollar U.S. government-managed care contracts. Dr. James also served as director of the Miami-Dade County Health Department and led the Miami-Dade County Health Department as it investigated and responded to the anthrax attacks of 2001. In 2002 the Miami-Dade County Health Department was awarded the Governor’s Sterling Award. James Jeng, M.D., is a surgeon at the Crozer-Chester Medical Center in P ­ ennsylvania, and he also serves as the chairman of the Disaster Sub­ committee, Committee on the Organization and Delivery of Burn Care, American Burn Association. Prior to his current position, Dr. Jeng was a professor of surgery in the Mount Sinai Healthcare System in New York City. Dr. Jeng has provided state-of-the-art burn care for both run-of-the-mill and extreme injuries in a three-state area of 7 million inhabitants (catchment area-abutted burn centers at Johns Hopkins, Medical College of Virginia, and University of Pittsburg). For two decades, he has taught surgical trainees from Georgetown University, The George Washington University, the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy, and Howard University. His teaching areas include trauma, acute care surgery, surgical critical care, burn care, and bench and translational research. Dr. Jeng became a recognized leader in the American burn community over two decades in diverse areas, including burn shock, end points of burn shock resuscitation, laser applications in burn care, laser Doppler velocimetry and microvascular analysis, the National Burn Reposi­ tory and data mining, data standards for burn care software, contingency planning for mass burn casualties, interface between the burn care com­ munity, the American Burn Association, and key components of the federal government, nationwide situational awareness of burn care assets, uniform practice guidelines in burn care, and burn care under austere conditions. Internationally, Dr. Jeng is currently leading burn community efforts in burn disaster preparedness. In the role of International Society for Burn Injuries committee chairman, he helped launch a six-pronged methodology with deliverables aimed at 2016: (1) codify and diffuse knowledge on burn shock resuscitation using only oral fluids, (2) catalog and diffuse knowledge of all known possible topical therapies for burn injuries, (3) systematically study and report on the phenomena/incidence of burn mass casualties around the globe so as to understand the extent of the problem, (4) continue efforts to bring further organization/connection between burn care providers and local governments, (5) catalog, diffuse, and strengthen linkages between all of the PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 179 NGOs with involvement in the worldwide burn care space, and (6) publish a multi-author opinion piece in the journal to catalyze database development and data mining for burn injuries around the globe. Robert L. Jones, Ph.D., is the chief of the Inorganic and Radiation Analyti­ cal Toxicology Branch, National Center for Environmental Health, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Jones has worked at CDC for 25 years, and his current responsibilities include the planning, implementation, oversight, and completion of programs related to public health that involve nonradioactive and radioactive elements or their iso­ topes. These programs involve research and development of a wide variety of analytical methods to enable CDC to assay and monitor the exposure of populations to toxic or essential elemental exposures and radionuclide con­ tamination. These analytical methods include both total elemental analysis as well as speciation of arsenic and mercury. Dr. Jones and his team are also developing a variety of analytical radionuclide bioassay methods for emer­ gency and terrorism preparedness and response. These methods will allow CDC to assist the states in responding to a major radiological or nuclear incident and allow for the assessment of contamination and exposure in people and to enable the efficient use of medical counter­ easures and allow m for rapid medical management decisions. Dr. Jones earned a B.S. in chemis­ try (1977), an M.S. in physical chemistry (1979), and a Ph.D. in bio­ hysical p chemistry (1986), all from Georgia State University. Prior to his current position at CDC, Dr. Jones served as chief (acting), Inorganic and Radiation Analytical Toxicology Branch (2007–2008); chief, Inorganic Toxicology and Radionuclide Laboratories, CDC (2002–2007); chief, ­ norganic Toxicology I Laboratory, CDC (2000–2002); and research chemist, CDC (1993–2000). Robert Kadlec, M.D., M.S., is the assistant secretary for preparedness and response (ASPR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The ASPR serves as the secretary’s principal adviser on matters ­ elated to public health emergencies, including bioterrorism. The office leads r the nation in preventing, responding to, and recovering from the adverse health effects of man-made and naturally occurring disasters and public health emergencies. As such, the office coordinates interagency activities be­ tween HHS, other federal agencies, and state and local officials responsible for emergency preparedness and the protection of the civilian population from public health emergencies. Dr. Kadlec spent more than 20 years as a career officer and physician in the U.S. Air Force before retiring as a colonel. ­ Over the course of his career, he has held senior positions in the White House, the U.S. Senate, and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Most recently, he served as the deputy staff director to the Senate Select Commit­ tee on Intelligence. Dr. Kadlec previously served as staff director for Senator PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

180 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Richard Burr’s subcommittee on bioterrorism and public health in the 109th Congress. In that capacity, he was instrumental in drafting the Pandemic and All-Hazard Preparedness Bill, which was signed into law to improve the nation’s public health and medical preparedness and response capabilities for emergencies, whether deliberate, accidental, or natural. Dr. Kadlec also served at the White House from 2002 to 2005 as director for biodefense on the Homeland Security Council, where he was responsible for conduct­ ing the biodefense end-to-end assessment, which culminated in drafting the National Biodefense Policy for the 21st Century. He served as special assis­ tant to President George W. Bush for biodefense policy from 2007 to 2009. Earlier in his career, he served as the special adviser for counter­ roliferation p policy at the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he assisted DoD efforts to counter CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear) threats in the wake of 9/11 and contributed to the FBI investigation of the anthrax letter attacks. He began his career as a flight surgeon for the 16th Special Operations Wing and subsequently served as a surgeon for the 24th Special Tactics Squadron and as special assistant to J-2 for chemical and biological warfare at the Joint Special Operations Command. He was named U.S. Air Force Flight Surgeon of the Year in 1986. Dr. Kadlec holds a bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy, a doctorate of medicine, and a master’s degree in tropical medicine and hygiene from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, as well as a master’s degree in national security studies from Georgetown University. Ziad Kazzi, M.D., was born in 1975 and raised in Beirut, Lebanon. Dr. Kazzi trained in emergency medicine at Emory University in Atlanta (2000–2003), where he served as a chief resident before completing a sub­ specialty fellowship in medical toxicology at Emory University, Georgia Poison Center, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. He is board certified in both emergency medicine and medical toxicology. Dr. Kazzi joined the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between 2005 and 2008, where he served as a medical toxicologist for the Regional Poison Control Center in Birmingham and the Alabama Poison Center. Currently, he is an associate professor at the Department of Emergency Medicine at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as the director of the International Toxicol­ ogy Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at Emory University. He is also the assistant medical director of the Georgia Poison Center and a guest re­ searcher at the National Center for Environmental Health at CDC, where he participates in emergency preparedness and response activities in radia­ tion. As an emergency physician and toxicologist, Dr. Kazzi specializes in the recognition, triage, and management of poisonings and holds a deep interest in the areas of radiation and international toxicology. Over the PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 181 past decade, he became involved in clinical toxicology activities globally that range from education to injury prevention and clinical consultation in the Middle East and North Africa region, Georgia, and India. He holds an adjunct appointment at the American University of Beirut and directs its clinical toxicology services. He is an active and founding board member of the Middle East North Africa Clinical Toxicology Association and cur­ rently serves as its president. He is also a board member of the Medical Toxicology Foundation and the American College of Medical Toxicology, at which he chairs the International Committee and the Clerkship Council on Medical Toxicology. Robert M. Levin, M.D., is the health officer/medical director for Ventura ­ County Public Health. He has served in that capacity for the past 20 years. Most recently, Dr. Levin has worked on nuclear preparedness, including a written nuclear plan that delineates Ventura County’s response to a nearby nuclear detonation and a public information campaign for residents of the county. Dr. Levin received his medical degree from the University of Missouri in Columbia. He completed his pediatric residency at San ­ Francisco General Hospital and the University of California, San Francisco. ­ He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases. He served as chairman of pediatrics at Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, California. In 1987 he moved his family to Chicago, Illinois, to become program director for the pediatric residency training program at Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn, Illinois, and then, in 1994, chairman of the Depart­ ment of Pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital, Chicago. He came to Ventura County in 1998 to assume his current position as Ventura County’s public health officer. As health officer, Dr. Levin has been the chief medical offi­ cer overseeing all Ventura County terrorism-related activities and threats. In October 2007, on behalf of Ventura County, he published the Ventura County Nuclear Explosion Response Plan. His work on nuclear public informa­ ion was partially funded by FEMA and the CDC. He has addressed t national audiences on the topic of the local impact of a nuclear detona­ tion and the development of a pre-nuclear explosion public information campaign for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Institute of Medicine, NATO, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in such cities as Washington, DC; New York City; Atlanta; and Los Angeles. MG Arthur “Joe” Logan, M.S.S., was appointed as the adjutant general of Hawaii on January 1, 2015. As adjutant general, he oversees the training and readiness of 5,500 soldiers and airmen of the Hawaii National Guard. He also serves as the director of Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, provides direct support to the Office of Veterans Services, and is the Home­ land Security adviser to the governor. General Logan received his commis­ PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

182 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT sion in 1984 from the Hawaii Army National Guard Officer Candidate School, Hawaii Military Academy. With more than 36 years of service, he has served in significant positions of authority and responsibility, includ­ ing commander, 227th Engineer Company; brigade engineer officer, 29th Separate Infantry Brigade; commander, 1st Battalion, 487th Field Artillery; counterdrug coordinator, Hawaii Army National Guard; commander, Re­ gional Police Advisory Command, Operation Enduring Freedom, Kabul, Afghanistan; chief of staff, Hawaii Army National Guard; and chief of staff, Joint Staff, Hawaii National Guard. Before assuming his current posi­ tion, he served as the G3, Hawaii Army National Guard. He has also held assignments in Pennsylvania and Afghanistan and has received numerous awards throughout his career, including the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star, the Meritorious Service Medal, and the Army Achievement Medal. He received a B.A. in justice administration and management from Hawaii Pacific University (1993), graduated from the Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas (1998), and received a master’s in strategic studies from the U.S. Army War College (2004). Patrick Lujan, M.P.A., is the public health emergency preparedness manager for the island of Guam. He has been instrumental in the overall planning for the potential nuclear attacks made to the island by North Korea. He has been at the forefront of all public health preparedness and response issues on Guam and the Pacific since 2010. John MacKinney, M.S., M.P.H., is the senior policy adviser for the U.S. Depart­ ent of Homeland Security Countering Weapons of Mass Destruc­ m tion (WMD) Office, on detail from the Office of Policy, where he has served as director of nuclear and radiological policy. Mr. MacKinney has more than 25 years of experience bringing people together to solve major homeland and national security challenges. He has expertise in applied risk sciences, policy analysis and development, nuclear and radiological issues, WMD counterterrorism policy and strategy, and WMD terrorism response. He advises and supports the CWMD assistant secretary and other department leadership in all matters related to nuclear and radiological policy, especially nuclear terrorism prevention, counter­ errorism, deterrence, and response. In t his policy role, Mr. MacKinney coordinates departmental and interagency policy development to counter WMD terrorism and leads and coordinates policy development with the White House. He has served on a number of senior-level White House National Security Council, Homeland Security Council, and Office of Science and Technology Policy committees and work­ ing groups, providing policy and technical input on development, writing, vetting, clearing, and implementation of a number of nuclear- and homeland security-related presidential directives and guidance, including Presidential PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 183 Policy Directives 8, 25, 33, 35, 38, and 42. Mr. MacKinney previously led the radiological/nuclear research portfolio at the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Homeland Security Research Center, where he built and led a team of Ph.D.s and engineers investigating response countermeasures to radiological dispersal device and improved nuclear device attacks. He has served as an expert consultant to the World Bank on nuclear issues. Mr. MacKinney holds a master of science degree in geophysics from the University of Wisconsin and a master of public health degree from the Johns Hopkins University and is certified in risk sciences and public policy through the Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute. Michael W. “Mac” McClendon is the director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response and the Emergency Management Coordinator at Harris County Public Health (Texas). Mr. McClendon joined Harris County Public Health in November 2005 as the emergency management coordinator. In August 2006 he was named chief of the Office of Public Health Preparedness and in March 2007 was named the director of the O ­ ffice of Public Health Preparedness and Response. Mr. McClendon is responsible for the all-hazard planning, response and recovery to public health emergencies within Harris County, Texas. Mr. McClendon also serves as the Harris County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Emergency Support Function #8 health and medical liaison. Mr. McClendon was formerly the emergency response chief for a major­ chemical manufacturer and has more than 29 years of experience in emer­ gency response and management. Mr. McClendon is a former chair of the National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO) Pre­ paredness Policy Advisory Group, current chair of the ­ ACCHO Radia­ ion N t Workgroup, and currently serves on the Incident Management, Big Cities & Jurisdictions and Public Health Preparedness work groups. He is also member of the State of Texas and the Federal Emergency Management Agency ­ rban Search and Rescue Team, where he serves as a task force U safety officer. Ron Miller, M.S., serves as the director of the Division of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) within the Office of the Assistant Secre­ tary for Preparedness and Response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NDMS is comprised of health professionals who augment health care systems to save lives during disasters. NDMS has multiple types of teams that support public health and medical needs during disasters, including Disaster Medical Assistance Teams, Disaster Mortuary Response Teams, and National Veterinary Response Teams. The program also han­ dles federal patient movement, mass fatality management, and definitive care through NDMS hospitals. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

184 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Ian Norton, M.D., is an emergency medicine doctor with postgraduate qualifications in international health, tropical medicine, and surgery and works for the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva managing the new Emergency Medical Team Unit. Previously the director of ­ isaster preparedness and response at the National Critical Care and d Trauma Response Centre, Darwin, Australia, he led the development of the government of Australia’s Australian Medical Assistance Team and its field hospitals and disaster response capacity. He helped design training programs for disaster response teams and wrote the Australia national trauma and burns plans. He has led the Australian government medical team deploy­ ments to the Ashmore reef boat explosion (2009), Pakistan floods (2010), Solomon Islands Dengue outbreak (2013), and Typhoon Haiyan —response in the Philippines (2013), including a 50-bedded surgical field hospital ­ for Tacloban city within days of the storm. He has also worked in Timor, India, Chile, Myanmar, Tonga, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia on capacity building and disaster-related projects. ­ Before a career in disaster medicine, Ian worked in the remote “Top End” of Australia in emergency medicine and aboriginal health. He is the lead author of the WHO global classification and standards for Foreign Medical Team deployment to sudden onset disasters, which led to his appointment to the WHO. The text effectively set standards that were previously not in place and that had seen teams in Haiti and other disasters perform opera­ tions they were not trained for or run out of drugs and supplies through poor preparation. In that role, he now leads the creation of a directory of Emergency Medical Teams that have reached a minimum quality standard and can be deployed to help countries in need; more than 90 of the world’s teams have already joined this initiative to raise the standards of medical response teams. In this role, he also manages training and capacity build­ ing of disaster and outbreak response teams in countries most likely to be affected by emergencies. He was deployed for more than 5 months to the West African Ebola outbreak (2014–2015) and led the coordination of more than 60 medical teams in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia and the design and build of five large Ebola treatment centers in Monrovia, along with the blueprint plans for building by the United Kingdom, the United States, and world food program in the three worst-affected countries. He led the coordination of 149 medical teams in Nepal during the earth­ quakes (April–May 2015) and the trauma response coordination in Mosul, northern Iraq (2016) and Yemen and responses to outbreaks such as the d ­ iphtheria outbreak among Rohingya refugees in 2017–2018. RADM Susan Orsega, M.S., serves as the chief nursing officer of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS). As chief nursing officer, RADM Orsega leads the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service (Corps) PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 185 Nurse Professional Affairs and advises the Office of the Surgeon General and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on the recruitment, assignment, deployment, retention, and career development of Corps nurse professionals. RADM Orsega is a senior program management offi­ er at c the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She is responsible for the operational manage­ ment of international research partnerships with South African and Malian governments, involving 150 international nurses and researchers and 7,000 research participants. In 2015, RADM Orsega played a fundamental role in the U.S. government (USG) NIH Ebola response and was instrumen­ tal in the implementation of the first human vaccine trial in Liberia and the operational management of the first Ebola Z-Mapp trial in Sierra Leone. RADM Orsega’s expertise in disaster care is evident by her selection to a USPHS medical team deployed after 9/11 as well as 13 other national and inter­ ational disaster/humanitarian USG missions serving in roles with n progressive nursing and leadership responsibilities. She was selected as the only USPHS nurse officer on the Advance Planning team, USS Pacific Peleliu Navy ship health diplomacy mission. Currently, RADM Orsega is a member of the Response Deployment Team-1. RADM Orsega began her career in the USPHS Commissioned Corps in 1989 in the Junior Com­ missioned Student Externship Program. At that time, when the HIV/AIDS epidemic was unfolding, RADM Orsega continued to advance her nursing and scientific knowledge with an emphasis on education and is recognized as a subject matter expert in realm of HIV/AIDS global research, advanced nursing practice, health diplomacy, and disaster response. She has authored 14 articles in peer-reviewed journals and presented at 22 major scientific and nursing conferences around the world. RADM Orsega is the recipient of the NIH director’s award in 2002 and the distinguished Uniformed Ser­ vices University Graduate of School of Nursing Alumni of the Year award in 2015. She served as the vice chair for the inaugural USPHS Federal Public Health Nursing Strategic effort that is in alignment with the U.S. Affordable Care Act, the surgeon general’s National Prevention Strategy, and the ­ uture of Nursing Report. RADM Orsega’s solid understanding of F the USPHS organization is a direct result of her consistent and long-term involvement from a junior officer to leading and participating in multi­ disciplinary and nursing PHS teams. Throughout her USPHS career, she has been actively involved in the nurse category. RADM Orsega served as chair of the Nursing Professional Advisory Committee (N-PAC) and on various N-PAC subcommittees, including Readiness and Response (chair), Awards (chair), and Events (member). She has worked with nurse leaders­ in other uniformed services over the past 13 years in various working groups, sharing best practices, and is currently serving on the Uniformed Services University, Graduate Nursing Program Doctor of Nurse Practice PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

186 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT Transition Team. RADM Orsega’s leadership strength is in bringing multi­ disciplinary members from different governments, organizations, cultures, and languages together toward a common mission, connecting talents with initiatives. One of her primary goals in every assignment is to disseminate knowledge to improve nursing practice and health systems globally. RADM Orsega received her bachelor of science nursing degree from Towson Uni­ ­ versity. In 2001, she obtained her master’s degree of science from the U ­ niformed Services University of Health Sciences Nurse Practitioner pro­ gram. In 2013, she was inducted as a fellow in the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Robert C. Whitcomb, Jr., Ph.D., M.S., CHP, is chief of the Radiation Studies Section, National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Whitcomb joined CDC in June 1993. In his current position, he serves as radiation subject matter expert and CDC spokesperson for technical and public health issues related to environmental radiation and nuclear/radiological emergency response. Previously, Dr. Whitcomb worked with the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety. His primary area of expertise is the assessment of radionuclides re­ leased to the environment and the impact on public health. He has authored ­ or co-authored numerous journal articles and is a recognized expert in domestic and international public health response in nuclear/radiological emergencies. Dr. Whitcomb is a member of National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the Health Physics Society. He is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics and served on the board of directors of the Health Physics Society (2004–2007). In addition, he serves on the World Health Organization’s international roster of experts in radiation, environmental hazards and health effects. Dr. Whitcomb holds a B.S. in biology from Florida Southern College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering sciences from the Uni­ versity of Florida. Jessica Wieder is the director of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Center for Radiation Information and Outreach. Ms. Wieder was EPA’s radiation communication lead during the response to the 2011 ­ ukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. She has facilitated international ­ anels F p on radiation risk public communication and was part of the contingency planning team for the 2011 launch of the Mars Science Laboratory. In 2010, Ms. Wieder was detailed to Federal Emergency Management Agen­ cy’s (FEMA’s) Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives Branch, where she helped establish FEMA’s Improvised Nuclear Device Re­ sponse and Recovery Program and created the intergovernmental Nuclear/ Radiological Communications Working Group. With her guidance, the PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 187 working group developed the nuclear detonation messaging document Im- provised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery: Communicating in the Immediate Aftermath. Ms. Wieder was also the lead author for the com­ munications chapter for the second edition of the White House’s Planning Guidance for Response to a Nuclear Detonation. In 2013, Ms. Wieder was awarded EPA’s Exemplary Customer Service Award for her leadership in en­ abling all levels of government to provide quick, effective communications to the American people in response to large-scale radiological emergencies. Chris Williams, M.S., is currently a deputy director with the Washington State Department of Health’s Office of Radiation Protection. Mr. Williams started his career with Science Applications International Corporation in Las Vegas, Nevada, in the late 1980s conducting impact assessments for the Yucca Mountain High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Project. In the mid-1990s, Mr. Williams came to work for the Washington Department of Health in the EMS and Trauma System office as a research manager and statewide planner. In 2002, Mr. Williams joined the newly formed Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response program and became its deputy director in 2007. Aside from a 9-month period as the acting director for the program, he maintained the deputy role until coming to the Office of Radiation Protection in 2015. Mr. Williams earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Western Washington University. He is also a gradu­ ate of two Harvard University executive education programs: Leadership in Crises and the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative. Mr. Williams has training as an incident commander, planning section chief, and liaison officer for the Department of Health’s Incident Management Team. During emergency response, he typically reports to the State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) to represent the agency in the SEOC policy room. In addi­ tion, Mr. Williams represents the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials as an executive committee chairperson for the National Alliance for Radiation Readiness. Laura Kwinn Wolf, Ph.D., is the division director for critical infrastructure protection in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In this role, Dr. Wolf tracks threats to health care and public health and leads a voluntary public–private partnership to mitigate risks across the sector and leverage public and private resources in disaster response and recovery. In 2017, Dr. Wolf was responsible for national-level coordination between the federal government and critical infrastructure owners and operators in the health care and public health sector for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and the response to WannaCry and NotPetya international ransom­ ware incidents. She previously served in ASPR’s Office of Policy and Plans PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

188 EXPLORING PREPAREDNESS FOR A NUCLEAR INCIDENT as the executive secretariat for the Federal Experts Security Advisory Panel for select agent biosecurity, represented the United States at the Biological Weapons Convention, and advised on policy for funding dual use research of concern. Dr. Wolf was honored as a Center for a New American Security Next Generation National Security Fellow in 2011 and a Partnership for Public Service Excellence in Government Fellow in 2012. Dr. Wolf earned her B.S. in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of California, San Diego, after which she transitioned to policy work via an AAAS Policy Fellowship in the office of Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA), where she covered pre­ paredness, antibiotic resistance, and genetic and infectious diseases for the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. Kevin Yeskey, M.D., currently serves as the principal deputy assistant secre­ tary to the assistant secretary for preparedness and response, U.S. Depart­ ment of Health and Human Services (HHS). The office leads the nation in preventing, responding to, and recovering from the adverse health effects of man-made and naturally occurring disaster and public health emergencies. Dr. Yeskey spent more than 24 years as a physician in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and retired as captain. In his USPHS career, he served in various agencies in HHS, including the Indian Health Service, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 2007 to 2012, he was the deputy assistant secretary for preparedness and response and the director of the Office of Prepared­ ness and Emergency Operations. From 1986 to 1999, Dr. Yeskey was a member of the HHS Disaster Medical Assistance Team of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS), serving as the team commander from 1993 to 1999. He was the chief medical officer for the NDMS program from 1998 to 1999. Dr. Yeskey also served as the medical policy adviser to FEMA operations prior to retiring from the USPHS. Dr. Yeskey received his bachelor’s degree from Brown University and his medical degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He has been board certified in emergency medicine for more than 30 years. James Young has been the Radiological Emergency Preparedness program manager for the State of North Carolina since 2014. As such, he oversees the planning, equipping, and exercising of the state’s ability to respond to an emergency at one of the three nuclear power plants in the state or at one of the seven within 50 miles. He has assisted with the development of the state’s Radiological and Nuclear Detection program and was the lead planner for the electromagnetic pulse plan. Mr. Young began his nuclear career as a submarine officer in the U.S. Navy. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Exploring Medical and Public Health Preparedness for a Nuclear Incident: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop on August 22–23, 2018, in Washington, DC, to explore medical and public health preparedness for a nuclear incident. The event brought together experts from government, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and the private sector to explore current assumptions behind the status of medical and public health preparedness for a nuclear incident, examine potential changes in these assumptions in light of increasing concerns about the use of nuclear warfare, and discuss challenges and opportunities for capacity building in the current threat environment. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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