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Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Appendix B

Biographies of Speakers and Moderators

ANN BARTUSKA (Planning Committee Chair) leads the Land, Water, and Nature Program at Resources for the Future. She joined Resources for the Future in 2017 after serving as the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s deputy under secretary for research, education, and economics as well as chief scientist. Prior to her work at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Dr. Bartuska held a host of leadership positions, including deputy chief for research and development of the Forest Service. She also has served in several appointments, including on the advisory board of the National Science Foundation; as executive director of The Nature Conservancy’s Invasive Species Initiative; and vice-president for public affairs of the Ecological Society of America from 1996 to 1999 and president from 2002 to 2003. She has served on the board of the Council of Science Society Presidents and is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Society of American Foresters. She is an ecosystem ecologist with degrees from Wilkes College (B.S.), Ohio University (M.S.), and West Virginia University (Ph.D.). She co-chaired the National Academies Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability from 2010 to 2013 and served as an ex-officio member of the Roundtable from 2014 to 2017. She currently serves as a member of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable at the National Academies.

RICKY ASHENFELTER is a co-founder and the chief executive officer (CEO) of Spoiler Alert, where he is responsible for overseeing the strategic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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direction of the company. As CEO, Mr. Ashenfelter advocates extensively on the role that emerging technologies can play in recovering value from unsold inventory and organics and is a frequent public speaker on food waste solutions in the United States and across global supply chains. Mr. Ashenfelter has spent his career in software, sustainability, and startups and at the intersection of how private-sector innovations can tackle the world’s largest energy and environmental problems. Before starting Spoiler Alert in 2015, Mr. Ashenfelter was a key member of Deloitte’s sustainability practice, where he led energy and supply chain analyses for major food, retail, and consumer packaged goods companies, including Walmart, US Foods, WhiteWave, Darden Restaurants, Nike, and SC Johnson. Prior to joining Deloitte, he was an early employee at ClearCarbon Inc. (a fast-growing sustainability and software startup acquired by Deloitte in 2010) and worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Climate Protection Partnerships Division. Mr. Ashenfelter holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and environmental studies from Georgetown University, earned his M.B.A. from the Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and was named to Forbes 30 Under 30 in 2017.

BOJANA BAJZELJ is a technical specialist for international food sustainability at the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP). Dr. Bajzelj is a global thought leader on the importance of shifting global food systems from their current trajectories. Her academic papers have been published in top scientific journals such as Nature Climate Change, and she has spoken about her work on BBC Breakfast and Today Programme, as well as at expert meetings organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the European Commission. At WRAP, Dr. Bajzelj advises on international food waste reduction projects such as the Resource Efficient Food and dRink for the Entire Supply cHain (REFRESH) and has led the development of WRAP’s strategic approach to healthy sustainable diets. She provides strategic direction and scientific advice on healthy and sustainable diets, food waste, and food production systems and their impacts on the environment. She is leading the development of a water stewardship target for the Courtauld Commitment 2025. In 2017, she was seconded to the UK government’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for 3 months, where she prepared a submission to the Minister on opportunities for cross-departmental collaboration on food policy between the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; the Department

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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of Health and Social Care; and Public Health England. Dr. Bajzelj joined WRAP in 2015 from the University of Cambridge, where she researched global food sustainability, land use, and climate change interactions. She holds a Ph.D. in land use, food security, and climate change from the University of Cambridge and an M.Sc. in environmental technology from Imperial College, London. In 2015, she received a medal from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds for conducting scientific work of the highest importance for nature conservation.

LIZ BALDRIDGE is the director of sustainability and food waste initiatives at Feeding America, the largest food rescue organization in the United States. Ms. Baldridge started with Feeding America in 2008 on its Manufacturing Product Sourcing Team. As a national account manager, Ms. Baldridge was responsible for managing and advancing partnerships with product donors across the United States. Her experience has proven successful in driving best practices at all levels of the organization and working collaboratively to develop emerging solutions. While managing a strong portfolio of food donors, Ms. Baldridge strengthened Feeding America’s non-food relationships, building awareness around Feeding America’s capacity and distribution capabilities. Ms. Baldridge is involved with the Food Waste Recovery Alliance, where she works with the food and grocery industry to recognize usable product within their supply chain, typically thought of as waste streams, and identifies solutions to convert the product into a safe, distributable form. Ms. Baldridge graduated from Ohio University and began her nonprofit career sourcing previously untapped resources of food for donation from national manufacturers.

JEAN BUZBY is chief of the Diet, Safety, and Health Economics Branch in the Food Economics Division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service (ERS). Dr. Buzby has worked either directly or indirectly for the ERS for more than 20 years. Prior to moving into management, her primary areas of work as an economist at ERS were food safety and food consumption research. Dr. Buzby’s food safety research included estimating the costs of foodborne illness, analyzing the legal incentives for firms to produce safer food, and exploring international trade and food safety issues. Her food consumption research was centered on using information gleaned from the Food Availability (Per Capita) Data System. She has also conducted research on food loss in the United States for over a decade and continues to publish estimates of the amount and value of food

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

loss at the retail and consumer levels in the United States, using data from ERS’s Loss-Adjusted Food Availability Data Series. Dr. Buzby received a B.S. from the Pennsylvania State University and received her Ph.D. and M.S. in agricultural economics from the University of Kentucky.

FRANKLIN A. CARRERO-MARTÍNEZ (Staff) has been director of the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine since August 2018. Prior to this appointment, he was the acting deputy science and technology adviser to the Secretary of State. Dr. Carrero-Martínez holds a B.S. in biology, with honors from the University of Puerto Rico, a Ph.D. in cell and developmental neurobiology, and a certificate in business administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His multidisciplinary career includes several roles in academia and government: from researcher, educator, and science administrator to roles in science policy and diplomacy. Previously, Dr. Carrero-Martínez held appointments as associate professor at University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez, adjunct professor at the University of Puerto Rico Medical Science Campus, and visiting scholar at Duke University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Japan’s Institute of Genetics. Dr. Carrero-Martínez started his career in science diplomacy and policy as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Roger Revelle Fellow in Global Stewardship. He served this prestigious fellowship with a joint appointment between the Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State and the National Academy of Sciences. At the end of his fellowship, he served as program director at the National Science Foundation supporting the foundation’s diplomatic and representational obligations, while managing a portfolio of international basic science collaboration grants before returning to the Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State in 2016.

CAROLA FABI has been a statistician at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations since 1999 and is the focal point for Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Indicator 12.3 on food losses. She revised the indicator, supervised the development of the food loss estimation model, and coordinated the development of guidelines for improving methods for estimating post-harvest losses for the period 2014 to 2015 under the aegis of the Global Strategy to Improve Agricultural and Rural Statistics. She has led the Methodological Innovation Team since 2016 that changed the methodology of the food balance sheets and is improving

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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the statistical processes in the fisheries, environment, water, and economic domains, and others. She holds master’s degrees in economic statistics and agricultural economics.

NELL FRY is senior manager of sustainability field support for Sodexo North America’s Office of Corporate Responsibility. In this role, Ms. Fry is responsible for supporting its operators in implementing corporate responsibility practices—with an emphasis on waste reduction—throughout Sodexo’s 13,000 sites in North America. Sodexo has committed to eliminating avoidable waste in all of its locations by 2025 in alignment with Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 12.3 and the United States’ target of 50 percent food waste reduction by 2030. Sodexo will take action in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Hierarchy and ReFED’s Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste. Ms. Fry is responsible for creating initiatives that can be rolled out to all Sodexo sites nationally to eliminate waste by raising awareness, improving processes, measuring impact, and collaborating with other thought leaders. Ms. Fry holds a B.S. in management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She started her career at Sodexo as a sustainability coordinator and energy analyst. Ms. Fry later joined Ernst & Young, where she supported the sustainability missions of Fortune 500 companies by working directly with a diverse client base to mitigate risk, manage brand value, and assist them in making a positive impact on their communities and the world.

ELISE GOLAN is the director for sustainable development for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In this role, she provides leadership in planning, coordinating, and analyzing the Department’s various policies, programs, and activities that impact and relate to sustainable agricultural, natural resource, and community development including food security. Prior to this, Dr. Golan served as the associate director of the USDA Food Economics Division in the Economic Research Service. She received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California at Berkeley and completed a post-doctorate fellowship focusing on environmental economics at the University of Haifa, Israel. Before joining the USDA, Dr. Golan did consulting work for, among others, the World Bank, the International Labour Organization, and the California Department of Finance. She served as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1998 to 1999. Dr. Golan’s research has spanned a wide range of sustainability issues, including land tenure and sustainable

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

land management in the Sahel and West Africa; rice-straw burning and sustainable land management in California; regional and U.S. food-system modeling; food labeling and market development; food access, affordability, and security; and the distributional consequences of food policy.

ALISON GRANTHAM (Planning Committee Member) is the director for food systems research and development at Blue Apron, a leading national meal kit company with the vision of building a better food system. At Blue Apron, Dr. Grantham leads all vision-related initiatives from regenerative agriculture to waste elimination. Most recently, her team has focused on food waste reduction through a multi-faceted approach ranging from spec overhauls, facility condition improvements, enhanced donation programs to food banks and employees, and diversion to animal feed and composting. These initiatives have supported a 68 percent year-over-year reduction in total waste in Blue Apron’s largest fulfillment center. Prior to joining Blue Apron, Dr. Grantham directed organic and sustainable agriculture research and policy outreach at the Rodale Institute and managed the Penn State Extension’s Start Farming! program. She holds a dual-title Ph.D. in ecology and biogeochemistry from the Pennsylvania State University and a B.A., summa cum laude, in biological sciences and environmental studies from Mount Holyoke College.

THOMAS HERTEL is distinguished professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University, where his research and teaching focus on international trade, food, and environmental security. Dr. Hertel is a fellow, and a past president, of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. He is also the founder and executive director of the Global Trade Analysis Project, which encompasses more than 15,000 researchers in 170 countries around the world (www.gtap.org). The project maintains a global economic database and an applied general equilibrium modeling framework, which are documented in the book Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and Applications, edited by Dr. Hertel and published by Cambridge University Press. He has supervised more than 40 Ph.D. students and published more than 120 peer-reviewed journal articles, along with several dozen book chapters and four books. Dr. Hertel is the inaugural recipient of the Purdue University Research and Scholarship Distinction Award. He has also received a number of Agricultural and Applied Economics Association awards including Publication of Enduring Quality, Distinguished Policy Contribution, Outstanding Journal Article, and Quality of Communication.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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He has also been advisor to two Outstanding Agricultural and Applied Economics Association Ph.D. and M.S. theses. Dr. Hertel holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from Cornell University, a master’s degree in public and international affairs from Princeton University, and a B.A. with honors in economics from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

AHMED KABLAN is a senior nutrition and public health advisor in the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Bureau for Food Security. Dr. Kablan is a biotechnologist and has more than 18 years of research, teaching, and science policy and regulatory experience. Dr. Kablan’s research has focused on metabolic syndrome, malnutrition, and the health consequences of obesity and overweight. During his tenure at USAID Feed the Future, Dr. Kablan has contributed to the publication of several key policy and strategy initiatives and papers, including the USAID multi-sectoral nutrition strategy; USAID’s research policy, nutrition policy, and Feed the Future nutrition action plans; and its global food security strategy. Dr. Kablan is the program manager for Feed the Future’s Soybean Innovation Lab, Innovation Lab for the Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss, and Nutrition Innovation Lab, and manages part of the USAID-CGIAR partnership. Dr. Kablan is a member of the USAID food safety working group and serves on the advisory committee for the Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health Academy technical working group on food safety, and a member of the Nutrition Innovation lab technical advisory board and broad of directors. Dr. Kablan was an American Association for the Advancement of Science, Science Policy and Technology Fellow (2012-2014). He earned his Ph.D. in biotechnology and pharmacology from the University of Bologna, Italy, and his Pharm.D. from Jordan University of Science and Technology. After his Ph.D., Dr. Kablan moved back to Jordan where he was an assistant professor at the University of Jordan’s Faculty of Pharmacy, and served as a subject-matter expert on biosimilar drug safety, rules, and regulations for the Jordanian Food and Drug Administration. As a consultant for the Jordanian Royal Scientific Association, he wrote in vivo toxicity and efficacy research protocols, and helped the association establish its first animal research facility.

LUCYNA KURTYKA (Planning Committee Member) joined the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research in February 2016 as a senior scientific program director, bringing more than 20 years of nonprofit and private-sector experience. Prior to joining the foundation, Ms. Kurtyka was

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

global lead on food policy and international organizations at Monsanto Company, where she worked with intergovernmental organizations, national and international professional associations, other companies, and governments to encourage science-based regulation, standards, and oversight of crops and foods produced through biotechnology. Ms. Kurtyka’s wealth of nonprofit-sector experience covers many facets of the global food system. As program officer at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, she managed projects in the areas of food and fiber systems, agricultural research, natural resource management, and international trade and economics. At the International Life Sciences Institute, Ms. Kurtyka directed international projects related to the development and safety of biotech foods and to natural toxins and pesticide residues in foods. Prior to that, while at the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) International, Ms. Kurtyka oversaw the validation and approval process for analytical methods published in the AOAC Official Methods of Analysis, which are used in nutrition labeling and serve as standards for regulatory purposes in food safety, nutrition, agricultural commodities, pesticides, and environmental quality. Ms. Kurtyka holds an M.S. degree in food technology from the Agricultural University in Krakow, Poland.

MARY MUTH is director of RTI International’s Food, Nutrition, and Obesity Policy Research Program and conducts research studies to analyze the impacts of policies, regulations, and other initiatives affecting food and agriculture. She specializes in analyses in the areas of nutrition, food security, food waste, food pricing, food labeling, food reformulation, and food safety. She has extensive experience with multiple modes of primary data collection; analyzing food availability, purchase, and consumption data; and developing economic models of the impacts of food policy. She has authored or co-authored more than 90 project reports and policy briefs; presented her research at numerous technical conferences and workshops; and published papers in the Journal of Law and Economics, Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Journal of Food Protection, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Nutrition Journal, Nutrition Reviews, and other journals. She has testified before Congress, briefed congressional and administration staff on study results, served on the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine committees on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake and Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments, and was chair of the National Academies of Science, Engineer-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

ing, and Medicine steering committee on Data and Research to Improve the U.S. Food Availability System and Estimates of Food Loss. Dr. Muth is an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University. Dr. Muth holds a Ph.D. in economics from North Carolina State University, an M.S. in agricultural economics from Cornell University, and a B.S. in agricultural and managerial economics from University of California, Davis.

RONI NEFF directs the Center for a Livable Future’s Food System Sustainability and Public Health Program and is an assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s Environmental Health Sciences Department and the Health Policy and Management Departments at Johns Hopkins University. Her work focuses on food system sustainability and resilience. She is engaged in multiple research projects on the issue of wasted food and is interested also in farm policy, climate change and food system resilience, food system worker health, meat consumption, and framing connections between food systems and public health. Dr. Neff developed the first-ever textbook on food systems and public health on behalf of the Center for a Livable Future, and she also manages the center’s research programs. She teaches two courses, Baltimore Food Systems: A Case Study in Urban Food Environments, and Food System Sustainability Practicum. Both are service-learning courses, and Dr. Neff was a SOURCE Service-Learning faculty fellow in 2012-2013. Dr. Neff obtained her A.B. from Brown University. She worked in public health practice and policy for 10 years, pausing midway for a master’s in health and social behavior from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then obtained a Ph.D. in health policy and management at the Bloomberg School before joining the Center for a Livable Future in 2006.

DENISE OSTERHUES leads Kroger’s sustainability, philanthropy, and community engagement efforts as senior director of the corporate affairs leadership team. Her responsibilities include leading and advancing change through Kroger’s Zero Hunger | Zero Waste social impact plan, and the company’s commitment to end hunger in its communities and eliminate waste by 2025. This includes developing the strategy and plans to launch Kroger’s Zero Hunger | Zero Waste Innovation Fund, which aims to identify and finance new solutions to the complex issues of food insecurity and food waste in the United States. Ms. Osterhues joined Kroger in 2007 in the Corporate Affairs Department in Cincinnati, Ohio. She was promoted

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

to director of associate communications and engagement in 2011, promoted to senior director in 2014, and took on her current role in 2017 to help lead the company’s social impact plan. Before joining Kroger, she led community development communications at First Union National Bank in Charlotte, North Carolina, including efforts to serve low-income neighborhoods and customers, and served in several roles at the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan, including media relations and financial communications, and environment, health, and safety communications for the company and Dow Plastics. Ms. Osterhues earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Kansas.

PETE PEARSON is the director of food waste strategy and execution for World Wildlife Fund, helping businesses understand the intersection of agriculture and wildlife conservation. For almost a decade, he has worked as a change agent within various businesses and nonprofits on regenerative agriculture, sustainability, and corporate social responsibility. Mr. Pearson has led local and national sustainability programs within the retail grocery sector across 2,000 grocery stores in 37 states. He also has more than 10 years of technology experience with companies including Hewlett-Packard, Accenture, and Albertsons. He has worked with public schools and hospitals as an independent sustainability consultant, co-founded a nonprofit focused on sustainable agriculture, and co-produced a documentary film on local food production. He received a B.S. in information systems from the University of Idaho and an M.B.A. in sustainable business management from Green Mountain College in Vermont.

PRABHU PINGALI (NAS) (Planning Committee Member) is a professor in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and is the founding director of the Tata-Cornell Agriculture and Nutrition Initiative at Cornell University. Prior to joining Cornell in 2013, he was the deputy director of the Agriculture Development Division of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, based in Seattle, Washington, from 2008 to 2013. Dr. Pingali has more than three decades of experience working with some of the leading international agricultural development organizations as a research economist, development practitioner, and senior manager. He was the director of the Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations from 2002 to 2007, and the director of the Economics Program at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico, from 1996

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

to 2002. He worked at the International Rice Research Institute at Los Banos, Philippines, from 1987 to 1996 as an agricultural economist, and at the World Bank’s Agriculture and Rural Development Department from 1982 to 1987 as an economist. Dr. Pingali was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences as a Foreign Fellow in 2007, a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association in 2006, and a Fellow of the International Association of Agricultural Economists in 2009. He served as the president of the International Association of Agricultural Economists from 2003 to 2006 and was named the 2010 Outstanding Alumnus of North Carolina State University. He has received several international awards for his work, including the Research Discovery Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association. Dr. Pingali has written 10 books and more than 100 referred journal articles and book chapters on food policy, technological change, productivity growth, environmental externalities, and resource management in the developing world.

TIMOTHY RICHARDS is the Marvin and June Morrison Chair of Agribusiness and Resource Management in the Morrison School of Agribusiness in the W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University. Dr. Richards completed his undergraduate studies in business at the University of British Columbia and Ph.D. at Stanford University. His primary research interest is applied econometrics with respect to food markets and food policy issues. His research encompasses both experimental and non-experimental methods of data analysis and has been published in the Journal of Retailing, Management Science, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, and many other journals. He has won 11 outstanding journal article awards and is on the editorial board of the European Review of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and Agribusiness.

KAI ROBERTSON is a senior corporate sustainability advisor and lead advisor for the Food Loss and Waste Protocol at the World Resources Institute. In this role, she works closely with companies and nonprofits to provide practical guidance on effective sustainability strategies, stakeholder engagement, and tailored insights on key issues. Her projects include developing a report for Ceres on sustainable agriculture and serving as lead advisor for the World Resources Institute, Secretariat of the Food Loss and Waste Protocol, a multi-stakeholder effort to create the global standard for accounting and reporting on food loss and waste. Ms. Robertson has more than 25 years of experience working with the food, beverage, and agriculture

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

sector. Prior to her current role, she led Business for Social Responsibility’s global food, beverage, and agriculture advisory practice and previously directed the development of corporate partnerships at World Wildlife Fund and Conservation International, working with companies such as Walmart, Kroger, General Mills, and Kraft Foods. Earlier in her career, Ms. Robertson worked for nearly a decade at the leading supermarket trade association, the Food Marketing Institute, researching and speaking about food and retail industry trends. She holds an M.B.A. from Northwestern University and undergraduate degree from Cornell University.

BRIAN ROE (Planning Committee Member) is the Van Buren Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics at Ohio State University. Dr. Roe attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he received a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics and was named as part of the 1990 Truman Scholar class. Dr. Roe went on to receive a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics at the University of Maryland. Prior to his employment at Ohio State, Dr. Roe worked on policy issues surrounding food safety and health information disclosure as a staff fellow at the Food and Drug Administration in Washington, DC. Since 1998, Dr. Roe has worked broadly in agricultural and environmental economics focusing on agricultural marketing, information policy, behavioral economics, and product quality. He recently served as an editor for the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, the flagship journal of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, and as the faculty leader of his department’s undergraduate program. He also helped form and currently leads the Ohio State Food Waste Collaborative, a collection of researchers, practitioners, and students working together to promote the reduction and redirection of food waste as an integral part of a healthy and sustainable food system. In addition to research on food waste, other recent research includes a U.S. Department of Agriculture–funded project focused on local foods and school lunch programs and participation in an National Science Foundation–funded multidisciplinary team seeking to understand human-ecosystem feedbacks in the Western Lake Erie basin, including how farms and agribusinesses respond to voluntary environmental programs and how Ohio residents respond to different options to manage Lake Erie water quality.

LANA SUAREZ is associate chief for sustainable management of food, under the Materials Management Branch of the U.S. Environmental

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×

Protection Agency’ Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery in the Resource Conservation and Sustainability Division. Ms. Suarez joined the agency in 2004 and previous to her present position, she supported federal agencies’ efforts to meet sustainability goals and coordinated federal partnerships for urban waters. She worked in environmental education from 2000 to 2003 with the Peace Corps in Nicaragua. Ms. Suarez attended the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment and holds a B.S. in environmental policy and behavior.

SUZANNE THORNSBURY is chief of the Crops Branch in the Market and Trade Economics Division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service. As branch chief, she manages a program of economic research and market outlook for grains, oilseeds, cotton, rice, fruit and tree nuts, vegetables, sugar and sweeteners, and other specialty crops and markets. Dr. Thornsbury joined the Economic Research Service in 2011 as senior economist and cross-commodity analyst for specialty crops in the Markets and Trade Economics Division. In 2014 she served as the senior advisor for agricultural economics and rural communities in the Department’s Office of the Chief Scientist. Prior to joining the Economic Research Service, Dr. Thornsbury was an associate professor in agricultural, food, and resource economics at Michigan State University, where her focus was specialty crop markets and trade policy. Dr. Thornsbury received a Ph.D. and M.S. in agricultural and applied economics from Virginia Tech and a B.S. in animal science from Virginia Tech with minors in agricultural economics and political science.

RICHARD TRACY is the vice president of international programs for the Global Cold Chain Alliance. An international development expert with more than 30 years of domestic and international experience, Mr. Tracy is exceptionally skilled in business development services delivery, agribusiness development, and micro lending and has worked in China, Togo, Zambia, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Armenia, Georgia, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, and Russia. In his capacity as the vice president of international programs for the Global Cold Chain Alliance, Mr. Tracy works to promote investment in the cold chain by facilitating networking opportunities, introducing potential partners both face to face and virtually, and developing online tools for industry networking and business-to-business linkages. In addition, Mr. Tracy has been instrumental in conducting cold chain assessments in Pakistan, Uzbekistan, and Zambia,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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which, as in the case of Pakistan, can lead to the development of a business strategy. Mr. Tracy has been a member of the Association for International Agriculture and Rural Development since 2010.

ROB VOS is director of the Markets, Trade, and Institutions Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute since September 2017. Dr. Vos has extensive academic and advisory work experience covering a broad range of development issues, including trade policy, inequality, and poverty; financing for development; poverty and social policy analysis; and macroeconomic and general equilibrium modeling for development policy. Before joining the International Food Policy Research Institute, he was director of agricultural development economics at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, responsible for economic analysis and policy support for sustainable agricultural development and food security. In that capacity, he was responsible for the Food and Agriculture Organization’s flagship publications, the “State of Food Insecurity in the World” and “State of Food and Agriculture.” Prior to this appointment Dr. Vos was the director of development policy and analysis in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs in New York. In that capacity he was responsible for the United Nations’ flagship publications, including the “World Economic Situation and Prospects” and “World Economic and Social Survey.” He also served as secretary of the United Nations Committee for Development Policy and coordinated the Secretary General’s Millennium Development Goals’ Gap Task Force as well as the United Nations Task Team for the Post-2015 UN Development Agenda. Previously, Dr. Vos was professor of finance and development at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University, where he still holds an honorary professorship. Dr. Vos holds a Ph.D. and an M.Sc. with honors in economics from the Free University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

ROB WILSON has been involved with Toast Ale since its inception in early 2016, initially as an advisor and later as chief toaster (chief executive officer). Toast Ale has had great success to date in the United Kingdom and has already expanded to the United States, South Africa, Brazil, and Iceland, with ambitions to rapidly grow to many other locations. Prior to Toast Ale, Mr. Wilson led Ashoka, an organization in the United Kingdom supporting a global network of social entrepreneurs to scale system-changing ideas and enterprises. Mr. Wilson is an award-winning serial social entrepreneur, having founded a number of ventures over the years. In 2004, he founded

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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READ International, a Tanzanian student volunteer–led development organization that to date has provided more than 1.5 million books to school children and created 100 school libraries. In 2012, he co-founded Generation Change, a partnership of the United Kingdom’s leading youth social action organizations, helping 600,000 young people per year take positive action in their local communities. In 2011 he co-authored On the Up with his wife, Nikki, a book about social entrepreneurs in Africa.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25396.
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Next: Appendix C: Workshop Participants »
Reducing Impacts of Food Loss and Waste: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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Even as malnutrition in the form of hunger and obesity affect the health and well-being of millions of people worldwide, a significant amount of food is lost or wasted every day, in every country, and at every stage in the supply chain from the farm to the household. According to a 2011 estimate by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), about one-third of food produced is lost or wasted globally. Beyond quantity estimates, however, less is known about the impacts on farmers, food prices, food availability, and environment of reducing food loss and waste.

On October 17, 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a workshop to examine key challenges that arise in reducing food loss and waste throughout the supply chain and discussed potential ways to address these challenges. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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