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Suggested Citation:"Keynote Addresses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Challenges to Implementing Successful Land Use Strategies at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25398.
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Suggested Citation:"Keynote Addresses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Challenges to Implementing Successful Land Use Strategies at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25398.
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Suggested Citation:"Keynote Addresses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Challenges to Implementing Successful Land Use Strategies at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25398.
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Page 9

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7 Keynote Addresses Keynote Address 1 Elusive Perspectives—How Hard Can This Be? Bill Lebegern,2 HNTB Corporation Bill Lebegern’s presentation provided an overview of the contextual differences of local community planning and airport planning. Lebegern noted that a key issue is the difference in how aviation and land use are regulated: aviation is federally regulated and land use is locally regulated. Airport operators must provide grant assurances to FAA, have an Airport Layout Plan (and meet its associated requirements), prevent revenue diversion (airport monies must be used on the airport), and comply with rules related to market value, residential development, and lease limits. Airport compatibility requirements include, among other things, Part 77, radar and light emissions, wildlife hazards, and so forth. Community compatibility with the airport reflects local needs (setting, tax base, market shifts, civic use, etc.). Lebegern presented a graphic showing how density near Dulles International Airport (IAD) has changed between 1970 and 2018. Lebegern explained that it is important to manage the expectations of all parties. As an example, he noted that airport operators and adjacent communities often compete for the same development projects but have very different regulatory settings. Airport operators are now considering non-aeronautical revenue sources and trying to meet local and regional development needs on land that is not needed for aeronautical purposes. Lebegern also said that the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA) has a staff of one person to address commercial development/non-aeronautical land uses, whereas the Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) has 14. Lebegern concluded by saying that it was important to keep compatibility policies up to date, even though it can be challenging given the rapid changes in the industry. 2 Bill Lebegern filled in for Thella Bowens, the originally slated keynote speaker, who was unable to attend the event.

8 Keynote Address 2 Land Use Policy Considerations Stephen Van Beek, Steer Davies Gleave Stephen Van Beek opened his presentation with the observation that airport operators have various project needs that drive how they use their land. The aviation business model is now focused more on airport land use. While individual airport needs vary, the business model is shifting, requiring airport operators to consider more flexible facilities, new funding sources, and commercial options. Specifically, planning at airports has shifted away from airfield needs to focus more on landside and terminal needs. Van Beek noted that by 2014, only six airports had more activity (operations) than they had accommodated in 2005, but that enplanements had been increasing significantly. He gave examples of how DEN, Piedmont Triad International Airport (GSP) in Greensboro, North Carolina, and Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) were evolving their planning to address greater demands in the terminal and landside. Van Beek discussed challenges such as costs of development, lack of funding sources (and issues between airport operators and carriers that are not willing to fund development), infrastructure flexibility needs, and the ability to bring new funding sources to the table. He noted that public–private partnerships are increasingly being considered. With technological changes and behavioral shifts, changes in on-airport and off-airport land uses are occurring that could provide new sources of support for an airport. Van Beek gave multiple examples, such as transportation network companies (TNCs) (e.g., Uber, Lyft) and their influence, connected automated vehicles (CAVs), and remote terminals. A question was asked about the tension between grant assurances and funding non-aeronautical, off-airport land uses. It was acknowledged (as of April 2018) that this continues to be an issue and is one that needs to be addressed. An audience member asked about the differences between automated people movers (APMs) and CAVs. Van Beek offered that, particularly on the landside, technological advances have developed very rapidly and will likely continue to do so: CAVs are expected to be fully operational by 2028 to 2030, and aircraft capable of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) are expected to be in operation by 2022. These technological developments are relaxing certain land use pressures but creating others.

9 Keynote Address 3 The Dallas–Fort Worth Experience John Terrell, Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport John Terrell gave a keynote presentation in which he provided an extensive overview of the innovative approach that Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) is using to develop projects. He noted that DFW completes a land use plan update every 5 years to be responsive to changes at the airport and in the economy. To stay aware of development needs, DFW participates in regional development discussions. DFW’s leases are usually 40 years, which requires FAA and host city approvals. DFW has a development vision for all its parcels and does tax sharing through an interlocal3 agreement for development. Terrell encouraged airport operators to think of their tenants not as tenants, but rather as potential partners whose technology they might use. He noted that DFW is working with Amazon to use Amazon technology to help with moving baggage and will be partnering with Uber as one of the launch cities for Uber’s Uber Elevate service. Terrell concluded by saying that DFW is considering residential development on airport and that the airport realizes that it will have to work with the FAA on the development issues. 3 “Interlocal” refers to a collaborative contract between public entities for providing more efficient, less costly public services.

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TRB’s Conference Proceedings on the Web 24: Challenges to Implementing Successful Land Use Strategies at Airports is a compilation of the presentations and a summary of the ensuing discussions at an ACRP Insight Event held April 10-11, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

The event brought together airport representatives and community planners to discuss effective strategies for improving their ability to partner on land use issues in the vicinity of airports.

ACRP Insight Events convene airport industry leaders and subject matter experts in various fields to encourage discussion and promote broader and deeper insight on topics of significance to airport operators. These in-depth, face-to-face gatherings are designed to promote communication and collaboration, foster innovation, and help identify areas of future interest and research, especially for topics of emerging importance.

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