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School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
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Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. School Success: An Opportunity for Population Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25403.
×
Page 66

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B Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Moderators1 Charles E. Basch, Ph.D., M.S., is the Richard March Hoe Professor of Health and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he has been teaching courses, mentoring students, and conducting research for the past 34 years. He specializes in planning and evaluating health education programs for urban minority populations to reduce health and educational disparities. His work has focused on individuals, groups, organizations, and social media, but it has a common theme of translating research into practice. The health and education programs he has developed and evaluated are philosophically grounded in informed voluntary decision making and rely heavily on building strong interpersonal relationships. Dr.Basch has been the principal investigator of 10 grant-funded research and program development studies (primarily supported by the National Institutes of Health), described in publications indexed by the National Library of Medicine. He speaks throughout the United States about ways to break down the silos between education and health and to involve local schools, health agencies and community organizations to reduce health barriers to learning; his recent presentations include audiences at the National Academy of Sciences, Education Commission of the States, National Education Association, and the Obama White House. Denise Chrysler, J.D., directs the Network for Public Health Law’s Mid-States Region, located at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. The Network promotes and supports the use of law to protect the public’s health by providing direct technical assistance; developing and providing training, materials, and practical tools; and connecting individuals with one another to build a public health law community. Previously, she provided legal services to Michigan’s state health department and served as its chief privacy officer. Her legal work includes communicable disease, environmental public health, public health research, privacy, health information exchange, and emergency preparedness and response. Denise is a member of her local board of health. Previously, she served as an elected member of the board of education for her local school district. Megan E. Collins, M.D., is an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute and an associate faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. She is also the director of Wilmer’s Pediatric Ophthalmology fellowship program. She received her medical 1 ✝member of the workshop planning committee; *=member of the roundtable. 59 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 60 degree from the University of Chicago, where she also completed a fellowship in clinical medical ethics. After her internship year in internal medicine at the University of Maryland, she returned to the University of Chicago for ophthalmology residency, followed by a fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at the University of Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. Her research interests include school-based models of vision care, barriers in access to eye care, epidemiology of pediatric eye disease, impact of refractive error on academic performance, and teaching of ethics and professionalism to ophthalmology residents. Rochelle Davis brings broad experience as a leader in children’s wellness and environmental health to her role as president and chief executive officer of Healthy Schools Campaign (HSC), a national not-for-profit organization she founded in 2002. HSC advocates for national, state, and local policies and programs that make schools healthier places to learn and work. She is co-chair of the National Collaborative for Education and Health, a national effort to support schools in creating the conditions of student health. In 2013, she co-chaired the Working Group on Health and Education, which was convened by the Surgeon General. Davis has been instrumental in the development of national healthy school food advocacy initiatives, including the Cooking up Change healthy cooking contest, and school environmental health resources, such as the Quick & Easy Guide to Green Cleaning in Schools. She also served as the principal investigator for HSC’s National Institutes of HealthFunded Partnership to Reduce Disparities in Asthma and Obesity in Latino Schools. Davis was a member of the U.S. Envinronmetal Protection Agency’s Committee for the Protection of Children’s Health. She is co-author of the Fresh Choices cookbook and was the recipient of the Chicago Tribune’s 2007 Good Eating Award. Jennifer Dillaha, M.D., has played a leading role in the Arkansas Department of Health’s health promotion efforts, using a life stage approach that focuses on population-based interventions to improve the health and well-being of all Arkansans, since joining the department in 2001. In November 2013, Dr. Dillaha became the Medical Director for Immunizations at the Arkansas Department of Health. Her charge in that role is to improve Arkansas’s immunization rates, particularly among adults. She is uniquely prepared for that role as a physician with specialty training in internal medicine and subspecialty training in infectious diseases and geriatric medicine. She is currently serving as the chair of the Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition’s board of directors and the Arkansas Cervical Cancer Task Force. Under Dr. Dillaha’s leadership, low health literacy has been recognized as an important public health problem in Arkansas, and the health department has integrated health literacy into its strategic plan. In April 2013, she became the Medical Advisor for Health Literacy at the health department. In January 2015, she began serving on the Roundtable on Health Literacy for the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to her current roles, Dr. Dillaha served as the Special Advisor for Strategic Initiatives in the Office of the Director from June 2010 to April 2013 and as director of the Center for Health Advancement from August 2005 to June 2010 at the Arkansas Department of Health. ✝* Marc N. Gourevitch, M.D., M.P.H., is the Muriel and George Singer Professor and founding chair of the Department of Population Health at the NYU Langone Medical Center. The focus of his work is on developing approaches that leverage both health care delivery and policy- and community-level interventions to advance the health of populations. He leads the City Health Dashboard initiative, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which aims to equip city PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 61 and community leaders with an accurate understanding of the health of their urban populations, including social, economic, and environmental drivers, to support population health improvement initiatives. He directs NYU Langone’s participation in the New York City Clinical Data Research Network, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In other research, he focuses on improving health outcomes among drug users and other underserved populations, including by integrating pharmacologic treatments for opioid and alcohol dependence into primary care. Kelly Hall is the founder and president of Pembroke Policy Consulting, a national health policy firm. Pembroke Policy supports integrated health centers, teaching hospitals, labor unions, think tanks, and consumer advocates as they implement the provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, expand access, and transform the health care delivery system. Prior to founding Pembroke, Ms. Hall served as a Senior Advisor in President Obama’s Office of Health Reform (OHR). There, she worked on the Medicare and Medicaid delivery system reform portfolio, the National Quality Strategy, health care workforce issues, and the Medicare Advantage policy. Before joining the OHR team, she was one of the founding staff members at the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI). At CMMI, she helped to hire the Center's first 100 employees, draft its foundational documents and processes, and launch flagship programs, such as the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization model and the Partnership for Patients initiative. During the drafting and passage of the Affordable Care Act, Ms. Hall served as the Senior Legislative Assistant for Health Policy to Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz (D- PA), a member of the Committee on Ways and Means. She began her career working for Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), both in Washington and on his campaign team. She is a graduate of Brown University. Jill S. Halterman, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She serves as chief of the Division of General Pediatrics and executive vice chair for the Department of Pediatrics. In addition to her administrative work, she also cares for patients in a primary care practice, which serves vulnerable children from the city, and directs a large research program funded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Halterman’s research has consisted of a sequence of translational studies to better understand and improve care for poor children with asthma. She has conducted several randomized trials in schools and in primary care offices to improve asthma care and reduce morbidity. The scientific merit of her work has been acknowledged through multiple peer-reviewed publications, substantial extramural funding, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s inclusion of references from several of her publications in its most recent national guidelines for asthma. ✝ Robert Kahn, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of Pediatrics and serves as the associate chair for Community Health at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Kahn co-directs the hospital’s community health strategic plan, which seeks to help ensure Cincinnati’s 66,000 children are the healthiest in the nation through strong community partnerships. The goals of the initiative are to reduce infant mortality and disparities in avoidable admissions and to improve school readiness and third-grade reading proficiency. His research interests lie at the intersection of poverty and child health, assessing what leads to worse health and where interventions might be most effective in a partnership with families and community agencies. His research focuses on common pediatric conditions through clinical, quality improvement, and population health PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 62 lenses. He attended Princeton University and the Vanderbilt College of Medicine, and he completed his residency and fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital. ✝* Robert M. Kaplan, Ph.D., served as chief science officer at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and associate director of the National Institutes of Health, where he led the behavioral and social sciences programs. He is also a Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Health Services and Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, where he led the UCLA /RAND AHRQ health services training program and the UCLA/RAND CDC Prevention Research Center. He was chair of the Department of Health Services from 2004 to 2009. From 1997 to 2004, he was professor and chair of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He is a past president of several organizations, including the American Psychological Association Division of Health Psychology, Section J of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Pacific), the International Society for Quality of Life Research, the Society for Behavioral Medicine, and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. He is a former editor in chief of Health Psychology and Annals of Behavioral Medicine. His 20 books and more than 530 articles or chapters have been cited more than 36,000 times (H-index >100), and the ISI includes him in the listing of the most cited authors in his field (defined as above the 99.5th percentile). He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) in 2005. He is currently the director of research at the Stanford School of Medicine Clinical Excellence Research Center. Diane Kilkenny, B.S.N., RN, is the Morrow County Public Health CARE RN Manager. Morrow is a rural/frontier county located in Northeastern Oregon. Ms. Kilkenny received her nursing education from Blue Mountain Community College and Oregon Health and Sciences University. She spent 13 years working at a critical access hospital in the OB/GYN department as a labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn nursery RN. She wanted to take the next step and follow up with new mothers, so she started working for Morrow County Public Health as a community health nurse and, in time, provided services in all public health programs. She implemented an early learning and home visiting program for new families, Healthy Start of Morrow County. The Morrow County program was one of the 13 sites chosen to represent Oregon in the statewide credentialing process for Healthy Families of America. She was instrumental in the development and implementation of the multidisciplinary community CARE Team, starting with co-writing the first transformation grant from the Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization (EOCCO) for the community health nurse supervisor/manager. Ms. Kilkenny has been a public health nurse for 18 years and believes in bringing health to where you live, learn, work, and play through building new pathways of local health delivery systems by leveraging community partnerships. Ms. Kilkenny is a board member of the EOCCO, Morrow County Local Community Advisory Council, EOCCO Clinical Advisory Panel, and many Eastern Oregon CCO subcommittees that impact the health of rural communities. Uma Kotagal, M.B.B.S., M.Sc., is the executive leader in population and community health and a senior fellow at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Kotagal was director of the neonatal intensive care units at the University Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s for several years. While practicing, she recognized that care and outcomes improvement were a system property. She completed additional training, receiving her Master of Science in clinical PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 63 epidemiology and clinical effectiveness from the Harvard School of Public Health, and refocused her clinical efforts on quality transformation at a systems level. She was also a visiting scholar at the Center for Risk Analysis at the Harvard School of Public Health and a visiting professor at the Tufts New England Medical Center, in the Division of Clinical Decision Making, completing further training in the field of decision and cost effectiveness analyses. Dr. Kotagal has published extensively in the field of neonatal outcomes research, including studies on neonatal cost models and early discharge of newborns. She published the first landmark paper on early discharge programs in the neonatal intensive care unit setting. Dr. Kotagal was born in Bombay, India, where she received her undergraduate and her M.B.B.S. from the University of Bombay. She did a rotating internship at the University of Bombay from 1970 to 1971 and another rotating internship at Detroit General Hospital from 1971 to 1972. At Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Dr. Kotagal completed her pediatric residency from 1972 to 1974 and went on to do a fellowship in neonatology from 1974 to1975. She completed a fellowship in neonatal physiology at the University of Cincinnati from 1975 to 1977. Dr. Kotagal is a senior faculty member of the Institute for Healthcare. She also serves as chair of the quality steering team of the Ohio Children’s Hospital Association, a member of the advisory committee of the Toronto Patient Safety Center, an associate editor of BMJ Quality and Safety, and a member of the Institute of Medicine, now The National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Kotagal is also a member of various local, regional, and national committees in the area of child health. Sanne Magnan, M.D., Ph.D., is the co-chair of the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is the former president and CEO of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (2006–2007; 2011– 2016). In 2007, she was appointed commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Health by Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty. She served from 2007 to 2010 and had significant responsibility for implementation of Minnesota’s 2008 health reform legislation, including the Statewide Health Improvement Program, standardized quality reporting, development of provider peer grouping, a certification process for health care homes, and baskets of care. Dr. Magnan was a staff physician at the tuberculosis clinic at the St. Paul Ramsey County Department of Public Health (2002–2015). She was a member of the Population-Based Payment Model Workgroup of the Healthcare Payment Learning and Action Network (2015–2016) and the CMS Multi-Sector Collaboration Measure Development Technical Expert Panel (2016). She is on Epic’s Population Health Steering Board and the Healthy People 2030 Engagement Subcommittee. Dr. Magnan served on the boards of Minnesota Community Measurement and NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, a federally qualified health center and part of Hennepin Health. Her previous experience also includes serving as vice president and medical director of Consumer Health at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. Currently, she is a senior fellow with the HealthPartners Institute and an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota. She holds an M.D. and a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from the University of Minnesota, and she is a board-certified internist. Kent McGuire, Ph.D., M.A., directs the Education Program at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. A veteran of philanthropy, government, and academia, he is nationally known for his strong commitment to both equity and excellence in education. His unique combination of cross-sector experience and leadership makes him exceptionally qualified to direct the program, which seeks to help all students succeed in college, work, and civic life. He will joined the PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 64 foundation in the summer of 2018. Dr. McGuire comes from the Southern Education Foundation, where he has served as president and chief executive officer since 2010, leading a team committed to advancing public education in the south. Prior to that, he served as the dean of the College of Education at Temple University and was a tenured professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. He served as Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education from 1998–2001. Dr. McGuire also brings a deep understanding of the practice of philanthropy and the work of the program’s grantees. He served as an education program officer at the Pew Charitable Trusts and directed the education program at the Lilly Endowment, and he currently serves on the boards of the Wallace Foundation, Institute for Education Leadership, New Teacher Project, and Alliance for Excellent Education. He also served as a senior vice president at MDRC. Dr. McGuire earned a Ph.D. in public administration from the University of Colorado, an M.A. from Columbia University Teacher’s College, and a B.A. in economics from the University of Michigan. ✝* Phyllis D. Meadows, B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., RN, currently serves as the senior fellow and program advisor for the Kresge Foundation Health Team. In this role, she is responsible for supporting the health team in the development and implementation of investment opportunities within and across the Foundation's various programming areas. Her professional career includes leadership roles in philanthropy, academia, community health, and governmental public health and accountability for the design and implementation of collaborative programs. She has previously served as the associate dean for Public Health Practice and a clinical professor in Health, Management, and Policy Department with the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Her responsibilities included facilitating practice and service relationships with communities both domestically and nationally. She has led several initiatives to expand multidisciplinary practice in communities, designing the university’s first certification program on population health and health equity for medical residents. She taught graduate-level and professional continuing education courses to address emerging health issues, including topics on health policy and public health leadership. She held an appointment as the director of health for the city of Detroit, providing leadership for the Detroit health department. Her philanthropic experience includes positions as program director for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Youth, Education, and Higher Education and as advisor for several national initiatives of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, including the Nurse Executive Leadership Program, Partners in Nursing, and the County Roadmaps project. As an RN, she has worked in both hospitals and community-based and hospitals. She currently serves on the board of several organizations and private foundations focusing on health. Janet Meyer, M.H.A., has led Health Share of Oregon since its inception in April, 2012. Health Share is the state’s largest Coordinated Care Organization, serving more than 300,000 Oregon Health Plan members in the greater Portland region. She has been in leadership roles in Oregon’s Medicaid program for the past 15 years and worked in the managed care industry for more than 25 years in Colorado and Oregon. Ms. Meyer earned her M.H.A. from the University of Michigan in 1989 after completing her B.S. in Public Administration at the University of Oregon. Kimi Sakashita, M.P.H., is an associate director in the Alameda County Center for Healthy Schools and Communities, which works with cross-sector partners in health and education to PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 65 develop school-based and school-linked strategies that support children’s healthy development from cradle to career. She provides leadership and facilitation to projects involving multiple systems and partners, including private foundations, businesses, youth development and health care organizations, and school districts. She ensured the successful implementation of multimillion-dollar grants from Atlantic Philanthropies and Kaiser Community Benefits and multiple federal Health Resources and Services Administration grants. Her expertise and technical assistance in facility planning, service delivery, financing, and sustainability for School Health Centers resulted in the expansion of school health centers from 12 to 29 in the county. She has more than 20 years of school-based health experience, from direct service, to oversight of multiple service delivery programs, to management of operations and evaluation for the Center. Her passion to address health and education disparities is demonstrated through her insistence on documentation, QI, and sustainability. However, her success comes from patience, persistence, and a sense of humor. She says, “My school health experience started the day I sent my first child to kindergarten.” * Heidi Schumacher, M.D., FAAP, is a practicing pediatrician and serves as the assistant superintendent of Health and Wellness at the Washington, DC, office of the state superintendent of education. In this role, she serves as the chief health officer for the state educational system, drives city-wide strategy and policy related to the intersection of health and educational outcomes, and leads inter-agency partnerships with the departments of health and behavioral health on service delivery models and cross-sector data sharing and population health strategies. She previously served as the deputy chief of Student Wellness in the DC public schools and medical officer at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation Center. She is a graduate of Duke University and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. She completed her pediatric residency and chief residency at Children’s National Health System in DC, where she continues to see patients. She is an active member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), including serving on the executive committee of the AAP’s Council on School Health and as secretary of the DC chapter. ✝* Joshua M. Sharfstein, M.D., is a vice dean for Public Health Practice and Community Engagement and a professor of the Practice in Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also the Director of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative. His book, Public Health Crisis Survival Guide: Leadership and Management in Trying Times, was published in June 2018 by Oxford University Press. Previously, he served as secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene from January 2011 to December 2014. In this position, he led efforts to align Maryland’s health care system with improved health outcomes, culminating in the adoption of a revised payment model for all hospital care for Maryland residents. He also oversaw the development of a statewide health improvement process with 18 local public–private coalitions and the reshaping of the state’s approach to HIEs, long-term care, and behavioral health. From March 2009 to January 2011, Dr. Sharfstein served as principal deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, where he oversaw the agency’s successful performance management and transparency initiatives. From December 2005 to March 2009, as Commissioner of Health for Baltimore City, he led innovative efforts that contributed to major declines in both overdose deaths and infant mortality rates. From July 2001 to December 2005, as minority professional staff and health policy advisor for Congressman Henry A. Waxman, he was engaged in a wide PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B 66 range of oversight and legislative activities on health care topics, including emergency preparedness, HIV, and the politicization of science.Dr. Sharfstein graduated summa cum laude with an A.B. in Social Studies from Harvard College in 1991. From August 1991 to August 1992, he worked on public health projects in Guatemala and Costa Rica with a Frederick Sheldon Prize Fellowship. He graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1996, from the Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center and Children’s Hospital in 1999, and from a fellowship in general academic pediatrics at the Boston University School of Medicine in 2001.Dr. Sharfstein is an elected fellow of the Institute of Medicine (2014) and the National Academy of Public Administration (2013). He serves on the board of Population Health and Public Health Practice of the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Medical Association. His awards include the Jay S. Drotman Memorial Award from the American Public Health Association (1994), Public Official of the Year from Governing Magazine (2008), and the Circle of Commendation Award from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (2013). Sheree Smith, RN, is the public health director for Morrow, a rural/frontier county located in eastern Oregon. Ms. Smith received her nursing education from the Good Samaritan School of Nursing in Portland, Oregon. She spent the first 12 years of her nursing career in the hospital setting before transitioning into the public health system. For the next 11 years, she served as a community health nurse, providing home visiting services to pregnant women and babies in addition to backup coverage for clinical and other public health programs, before becoming the public health director 16 years ago. Ms. Smith has served in the field of public health for 27 years and has witnessed many positive changes through expansion of programs offered and number of clients served within the public health delivery system. She is actively involved in health care transformation at the local level, integrating public health through collaboration with other health care delivery systems and community partners, and serves as the Morrow County Local Community Advisory Council coordinator/chair for the Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization (EOCCO) . Lillian Shirley, B.S.N., M.P.H., M.P.A., is the director for the Oregon Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority. She holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of the State of New York. She also holds master’s degrees in public health from Boston University and in public administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Ms. Shirley has been a local and a national leader in advancing public health. Most recently, she led the Multnomah County health department. Before coming to Oregon, she was the director of Public Health for the city of Boston and the first executive director of the Boston Health Commission, where she led the agency through the establishment, design, and organization of the new public health authority in Boston. Ms. Shirley has been a leader in Oregon’s effort to transform the state’s health care system. While at the Multnomah County health department and on the governing board of Health Share of Oregon, she helped launch one of the first coordinated care organizations in the state. She also served as the vice chair of the Oregon Health Policy Board and has played a vital role in the state’s move toward a health care system that works better for everyone. Ms. Shirley has served on the boards of the Public Health Foundation, Oregon Public Health Institute, and Portland Sustainable Development Commission and as president of the National Association of City and County Health Officials. She is also adjunct PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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Education and health care significantly influence well-being and health outcomes, especially throughout adolescence. In fact, doctors note that performance in school is highly reflective of a child’s current and future health. Despite knowledge of this connection, pediatricians are rarely aware of their patients’ school performance and have a limited understanding of the education system. Fostering collaboration and aligning efforts within the health and education sectors is a critical step towards building stronger and healthier communities.

On June 14, 2018, the National Academies convened a workshop to discuss how efforts within the health sector can support children’s education from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and to explore the barriers between these sectors. The committee also examined case examples of health-education collaboration and opportunities in policy. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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