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Understanding Northern Latitude Vegetation Greening and Browning: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Understanding Northern Latitude Vegetation Greening and Browning: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25423.
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Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches

Dr. Scott Goetz (Chair) is a Professor at Northern Arizona University in the School of Informatics, Computing and Cyber Systems (SICCS). He has conducted satellite remote sensing research for environmental science applications over some 30 years, having organized and served on numerous working groups for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations programs on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD), the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) programs on arctic and carbon cycle science, climate change, and terrestrial ecology. He is the Science Lead of NASA’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) and Deputy Principal Investigator of NASA’s Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation. He has authored approximately 180 refereed publications that have been cited more than 20,000 times. His research has been covered by numerous news agencies (including The New York Times and National Public Radio), popular magazines (e.g., National Geographic, Scientific American) and science news venues (e.g., Nature, Science). He was awarded a Fulbright Research Scholarship in Toulouse France (2010) and has received NASA team awards for interdisciplinary science (1990, 1996). Between 2002 and 2015, he was a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), including 5 years as Deputy Director, and serves on WHRC’s Board of Directors. He has been a board member of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) since 2012, a member of ERL’s Executive Board since 2016, and served for 10 years as an Associate Editor of Remote Sensing of Environment (2005-2015). He has also supported and mentored dozens of early career scientists and graduate students.

Dr. Elizabeth Campbell is a Forest Ecologist with the Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada. At the Canadian Forest Service, Dr. Campbell’s research includes the analysis of observational data (from tree rings, permanent sample plots, and remote sensing) to quantify changes in forest growth and productivity, historical disturbance regimes, and forest dynamics; and the use of multiple model approaches to forecast potential climate change impacts on forest structure and dynamics. She currently leads a Natural Resources Canada Forest Change Program research project on “Western Boreal Forest Vulnerability to Climate Change,” and serves on the core science team Forest Change Program. Dr. Campbell is a member of the Vegetation Dynamics Working Group for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment and represents Canada on a Food and Agriculture Organization (United Nations) North American Forest Commission Working Group examining the implications of climate change on forest genetic resources. She has also served as an expert witness for resource development hearings (pipelines/hydro) in Canada’s boreal forest and provided expert review for the second order draft of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group II contribution to the 5th Assessment Report, Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Before joining the Canadian Forest Service in 2011, Dr. Campbell worked for 10 years as a Research Forest Ecologist with the British Columbia Ministry of Forests. During her tenure there she was lead author on the province’s scientific foundation report on adapting forest management to a changing climate. She obtained a Ph.D. in boreal forest ecology from the University of Quebec at Montreal, Centre for Forest Studies.

Dr. Eugenie S. Euskirchen is an Associate Research Professor in the Institute for Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Her research focuses on terrestrial ecology in high-latitude regions and interactions with the surrounding natural and human-altered landscapes. This includes working toward

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Understanding Northern Latitude Vegetation Greening and Browning: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25423.
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a better understanding of the sensitivity of Arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems to warming and, in particular, how ecosystem changes shift the timing and dynamics of climatological and ecological factors, eventually feeding back to influence the climate. She pursues research questions at multiple temporal and spatial scales, using both model- and field-based approaches. Dr. Euskirchen currently holds multiple leadership positions, including serving as co-chair of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Technical Working Group Advisory Board for Surface-Atmosphere Exchange and as a working group member for the Terrestrial Instrument Data quality assurance/quality control group; on the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment Science Team; on the Steering Committee for synergies between NEON and the Long Term Ecological Research network; as a working group lead for a National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis Arctic Data Center activity focused on reconciling historical and contemporary trends in terrestrial carbon exchange of the northern permafrost-zone; and on the Integrated Arctic Social Observation System Arctic-Atmosphere Surface Coupling Initiative. She received her B.S. from Marymount College, M.S. from Johns Hopkins University, and Ph.D. from Michigan Technical University.

Dr. Benjamin Poulter is a research scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center. His research integrates process models and remote sensing to understand how terrestrial ecosystems are responding to climate change, changing atmospheric trace gases, land-use and land-cover change, and disturbance. He has worked internationally and in the United States working with colleagues to understand the role of the terrestrial carbon cycle in the Earth system, which included investigations of vegetation greening and browning in various ecosystem types as well as in global syntheses. These studies included exploring how changes in light-use efficiency, carbon dioxide fertilization, land-use change, and interactions between drivers have been linked to vegetation greening and browning. He currently serves on the North American Carbon Program and the Integrated Land Ecosystem Processes Study scientific steering committees and on the Editorial Board for Global Ecology and Biogeography. Dr. Poulter received a B.S. from the University of Idaho and a Ph.D. from Duke University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Understanding Northern Latitude Vegetation Greening and Browning: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25423.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Understanding Northern Latitude Vegetation Greening and Browning: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25423.
×
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Vegetation change has been observed across Arctic and boreal regions. Studies have often documented large-scale greening trends, but they have also identified areas of browning or shifts between greening and browning over varying spatial extents and time periods. At the same time, though, there are large portions of these ecosystems that have not exhibited measurable trends in greening or browning. These findings have fueled many questions about the drivers of vegetation dynamics, how trends are measured, and potential implications of vegetation change at local to global scales.

In December 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, convened a workshop to discuss opportunities to improve understanding of greening and browning trends and drivers and the implications of these vegetation changes. The discussions included a close look at many of the methodological approaches used to evaluate greening and browning, as well as exploration of newer technologies that may help advance the science. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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