National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25501.
×
Page 106

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix C Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches Olusoji Adeyi, M.D., Dr.P.H., M.B.A., is the director of Health, Nutri- tion, and Population Global Practice at the World Bank. He was founding director of the Affordable Medicines Facility—malaria at the Global Fund. He has led many initiatives on global, regional, and country health poli- cies, strategies, and programs. He serves as a commissioner on the Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health, the Commission on High Quality Health Systems, and the Commission on Investing in Health. He holds a medical doctorate from the University of Ife in Nigeria, a master of com- munity health from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, a master of business administration from Imperial College London, and a doctor of public health from Johns Hopkins University. Amanda BenDor, M.P.H., has more than 15 years of experience in global health and a strong focus on health systems strengthening. Currently, she provides technical and management leadership to PATH’s Digital Square and Global Health Security Partnership. For Digital Square, she manages efforts to implement the project’s global goods work; she collaborates with and supports partners who improve core software development for global goods. She also supports Digital Square’s strategic partnerships by coordinating with investors to synergize and accelerate investments that catalyze the project’s goals and objectives. Ms. BenDor is co-chair emeri- tus of the Global Digital Health Network and remains on the network’s board. In that capacity, she supports events such as the annual Global Digital Health Forum. Prior to joining PATH, Ms. BenDor worked for 97 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

98 VALUE PROPOSITION AND INNOVATIVE MODELS 12 years at IntraHealth International, where she led mHero and iHRIS implementations and supported global health workforce programs. In addition, she was the technical advisor for IntraHealth to the Knowledge for Health Project, a global family-planning, knowledge-management program funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. Ms. BenDor received her M.P.H. from the Maternal and Child Health Depart- ment at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). While at UNC-CH, she also received a global health certificate and the U.S. Foreign Language Area Studies award for KiSwahili. She has a B.S. in international business and French from Meredith College. Natasha Bilimoria, M.S.W., is the director of U.S. Strategy for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi), where she leads efforts to mobilize public- and private-sector support in the United States to fund childhood immuni- zation in the world’s poorest countries. Her leadership experience and relationships with U.S. government officials, nongovernmental organiza- tions, and the private sector have been instrumental in furthering Gavi’s visibility in the United States and throughout the global health commu- nity. Prior to assuming this role in 2013, Ms. Bilimoria served for 7 years as president of Friends of the Global Fight, where she led U.S. efforts to support the lifesaving work of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tubercu- losis and Malaria (Global Fund). Previously, she held several positions at the Elisabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Ms. Bilimoria also served in the Clinton administration at the White House and in the U.S. Department of the Treasury, where she worked on domestic economic development issues. She was a member of the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition Team’s state, national security, defense, intelligence, and arms- control agency-review team and led a comprehensive review and analysis of all U.S. global health programs. Ms. Bilimoria serves on the Board of Directors for Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, which is the U.S. investment arm for the Global Fund. Cara Bradley is PATH’s chief corporate-engagement officer and leads its global strategy to expand industry partnerships to solve the world’s most challenging health problems. Her team brings together programs, countries, companies, funders, and policy makers to drive PATH’s cor- porate engagement activities, which focus on multi-sector partnerships that take innovation to scale and improve life for hundreds of millions of people every year. Ms. Bradley is a passionate global health advocate who has committed her career to advancing a rights-based approach to development. She joined PATH in 2015 to help expand and deepen its private-sector relationships, and she focuses on shared-value partnerships PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 99 that benefit society as well as the bottom line. Ms. Bradley has more than 12 years of experience developing groundbreaking industry partnerships and expanding the capacity of international organizations to partner with industries globally. Before joining PATH, she led a multidisciplinary Euro- pean fundraising division at International Rescue Committee. Prior to that, she worked at the United Nations Children’s Fund, WaterAid, and other leading nongovernmental organizations. A native of the United Kingdom, Ms. Bradley earned her B.A. from Kent University. Brian Brink, MB.B.Ch., D.Med. (Hon), retired as the chief medical officer of Anglo American plc at the end of 2014. Currently, he is a non-executive director of Discovery Limited. He was awarded an honorary doctorate in medicine by the University of the Witwatersrand in recognition of his contribution to the private-sector response to HIV/AIDS in South Africa. He has been a member of the private-sector constituency on the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria since its incep- tion in 2002. Dr. Brink has long experience in the funding and delivery of health care and remains actively engaged in discussions around uni- versal health coverage, health systems strengthening, and public–pri- vate partnerships in health. Dr. Brink serves on several nongovernmental organization boards in the field of health and human rights, including SECTION27, Right to Care, the International Women’s Health Coalition, and GrassrootSoccer. Donald Bundy, Ph.D., focuses on the global elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and on the impact of disease on the health and development of children and adolescents. He currently advises the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation on developing its global portfo- lio on NTDs. Until 2018, he was deputy director and senior advisor on NTDs in the Global Health Team of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, based in Seattle and London, where he reorganized and relaunched the foundation’s NTD program. Previously, as lead health specialist at the World Bank in Washington, DC, Dr. Bundy worked for 15 years with governments in 77 low- and middle-income countries to help apply sci- entific rigor to the design, implementation, and evaluation of national health programs. He coordinated the World Bank response to NTDs while also partnering with the World Health Organization to lead the $1.2 bil- lion African Riverblindness Programme (APOC). APOC harmonized the actions of more than 30 donors in 31 countries in sub-Saharan Africa to treat more than 100 million people annually. Prior to that, Dr. Bundy had a successful academic career for 20 years at Oxford University, Imperial College London, and the University of the West Indies. During that time, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

100 VALUE PROPOSITION AND INNOVATIVE MODELS he focused on the epidemiology and control of infectious disease. He has contributed to 380 publications and has produced award-winning docu- mentary films, including a series for the U.S. Public Broadcasting Service. Currently, he is a member of the editorial team for Disease Control Priori- ties, 3rd Edition (DCP3). Mona Byrkit, M.P.H., is the managing director of Global Engagement at PATH and is based in the organization’s San Francisco office. As chief rep- resentative for PATH in the Bay Area, Ms. Byrkit is responsible for form- ing strategic partnerships to advance PATH’s vision: health for all. Prior to this, Ms. Byrkit was based in Hanoi, Vietnam, and led PATH’s portfolio in the Greater Mekong Subregion of Asia. Ms. Byrkit’s team introduced a wide range of innovative technologies and approaches that addressed infectious diseases; reproductive, maternal, and child health; nutrition; vaccine development; and immunization systems. Ms. Byrkit helped forge key public–private partnerships to enable health solutions, such as the introduction of fortified rice in Myanmar, access to new technologies for the prevention of HIV in Vietnam, and private-sector investments to vaccinate against life-threatening diseases throughout the Mekong region. Before joining PATH in 2009, she served as director of CARE’s global sexual and reproductive health program. Before CARE, she was deputy director of a global reproductive health project at IntraHealth in North Carolina. Ms. Byrkit also served as assistant population advisor for the U.S. Agency for International Development and was based in the U.S. embassy in Turkey in the 1990s and was a Peace Corps volunteer in Sen- egal. In addition to her international experience, Ms. Byrkit spent several years working in U.S. domestic politics and as an advisor on health and human services in California. Ms. Byrkit has a bachelor of arts degree in international relations from Pomona College and an M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley. She has worked in more than 20 coun- tries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, and she speaks French, Wolof (Senegal), and basic Turkish and Vietnamese. Rachel Cohen, M.P.P., is the regional executive director of the North American office of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), an international not-for-profit research and development organization that discovers and develops new medicines for several neglected tropi- cal diseases, pediatric HIV, hepatitis C, and, through a joint initiative with the World Health Organization called the Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership, serious drug-resistant infections. Prior to joining DNDi in 2011, Ms. Cohen worked for Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) from 1999 to 2010. She served as head of PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 101 mission for MSF in South Africa and in Lesotho for 4 years and oversaw numerous medical programs that were primarily focused on HIV/AIDS and drug-resistant tuberculosis. Before working for MSF in the field, Ms. Cohen was the U.S. director of MSF’s Access to Essential Medicines Cam- paign. From 2009 to 2015, she served on the Board of Directors of MSF’s Operational Center in Brussels. Prior to working with MSF, Ms. Cohen was the director of Foundation and Corporate Giving at Housing Works, the largest minority-controlled AIDS service organization in the United States. Before that, she served as program coordinator for the U.S.+Cuba Medical Project, where she directed medical aid, education, and advocacy programs. Ms. Cohen earned her master in public policy with a certificate in health and health policy from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Brenda D. Colatrella, M.B.A., is the associate vice president of Corporate Responsibility at Merck & Co., Inc. (Merck), where she is responsible for the development, implementation, and reporting of Merck’s global corporate responsibility approach on environmental, social, ethical, and governance issues in alignment with the company’s business strategy. She also oversees several of Merck’s global health partnerships and relation- ships with key partners and is involved in developing policies that help expand access to medicines, vaccines, and quality health care—particu- larly in the developing world and in emerging markets. She also serves as president of the Merck Foundation, a private charitable foundation that was established in 1957. It is based in the United States, funded entirely by Merck, and represents Merck’s chief source of funding support for quali- fied nonprofit charitable organizations. Ms. Colatrella is also the president of the Merck Patient Assistance Program, which provides free Merck medications and adult vaccines to eligible individuals in the United States who need such resources but lack access to them through insurance cov- erage and cannot afford to pay for them otherwise. Prior to leading the corporate responsibility division, Ms. Colatrella was the executive direc- tor of Global Health Partnerships within the division. There, she was responsible for key global health and access partnerships and for Merck’s relationships with a wide range of stakeholders in the global health arena. She was also executive director of HIV Policy and External Affairs for the Europe, Middle East, Africa, and Canada region and primarily focused on driving Merck and industry initiatives to improve access to HIV/AIDS care and treatment in the developing world. In addition, she was senior vice president of the Merck Foundation and senior director in its Office of Contributions. In these roles, she was responsible for all foundation and corporate cash grant-making activities and product donations programs PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

102 VALUE PROPOSITION AND INNOVATIVE MODELS (e.g., the Merck Mectizan Donation Program). Ms. Colatrella received her B.A., summa cum laude, from Muhlenberg College and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She completed her M.B.A. at New York University’s Stern School of Business where she received the Dean’s Award. She has published several articles on the Mectizan Donation Program, on the role of the private sector in global health, and on successful public–private partnerships. James Coughlan leverages 30 years of experience with The UPS Founda- tion as the former global president of United Parcel Service (UPS) Customer Solutions to provide design expertise on supply chains to The UPS Founda- tion and its humanitarian partners. After he retired from UPS, Mr. Cough- lan became a supply chain expert on mission for The UPS Foundation to fulfill his passion to engage the humanitarian sector. He currently provides support for the supply-chain-strengthening and capacity-building efforts of leading humanitarian agencies. Shawn Dolley is the director of management consulting for Life Sci- ence and Health Care at Cloudera and a “transformation coach” for cus- tomers as they move toward an artificial intelligence (AI) and big-data- driven approach to informatics. Mr. Dolley provides advice on use cases in research, discovery, and outcomes and on translational medicine and population health. His work includes convening and supporting public– private partnerships in global health. Prior to this role, Mr. Dolley was an industry leader for health and life science, and he set Cloudera’s vision, roadmap, solutions, and partnerships in areas such as precision medicine, real-world evidence, and clinical prediction. Prior to his work at Clou- dera, Mr. Dolley led the health care and life science industry practice at Netezza. When IBM acquired Netezza, Mr. Dolley joined the public-sector industry practice for IBM. Mr. Dolley also designed a Health Outcomes Analytic Appliance in conjunction with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Mr. Dolley has worked in analytics since 1995. He is a member of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health and of the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics Collaborative. Mr. Dolley is on the Board of Advisors for Precision Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is a board member of Predict Align Prevent, a new program that uses predictive analytics to prevent child abuse and neglect. He was recently named one of Washington, DC’s “Fifty on Fire,” a list of the 50 most innovative people or companies in the district. Today, he primarily focuses on precision public health, global computational epidemiology, and open source technology. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 103 Clarion Johnson, M.D., co-chair of the Forum on Public–Private Partner- ships for Global Health and Safety, served as the global medical director of ExxonMobil Corporation until his retirement in 2013. Currently, Dr. Johnson is a consultant to ExxonMobil, the immediate past chair of the Joint Commission’s International and Resource Boards, and a member of the Yale School of Public Health Leadership Council. He serves on sev- eral boards, including those at the Bon Secours Hospital System, the Yale School of Public Health, and the Milbank Memorial Fund. Dr. Johnson previously served on the Board on Global Health at the National Acad- emies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Johnson also holds a secretary appointment from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to the Advisory Board of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and was a member of the Governor’s Task Force on Health Reform in Virginia and a co-chair of the Governor’s Task Force on Insurance Reform. He is the past chair of the Virginia Health Care Foun- dation and of the board of City Lights Charter School in Washington, DC. He served as an advisor and a lecturer in the Harvard Medical School’s Department of Continuing Education “Global Clinic Course” from 2005 to 2008. In 2013, he received the President’s Award from the Oil and Inter- national Petroleum Industry Environment Conservation Association and from the Oil and Gas Producers for contributions to health, and in 2012, he received the Society of Petroleum Engineers Award for Health, Safety, Security, Environment, and Social Responsibility. In 2011, he received a medal from the French Armed Forces Institute De Recherche Biomedical for Project Tetrapole, a public–private partnership in malaria research. Dr. Johnson is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, as well as a member of its board of trustees, and of the Yale School of Medicine. While on active duty in the U.S. Army, he also trained as a microwave researcher at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and occupational medicine. Wiweka Kaszubska, Ph.D., is the head of product development at Medi- cines for Malaria Venture (MMV), which is based in Geneva, Switzer- land. MMV’s mission is to bring new, effective, and affordable medicines to malaria-endemic countries and, ultimately, to eradicate disease. Dr. Kaszubska is responsible for the late-stage development portfolio of anti- malarial drugs. Her team works in close partnership with pharmaceutical organizations to develop and register new medicines for malaria-endemic countries. Prior to joining MMV in 2012, she was the head of the Global Product Unit for Autoimmune and Inflammatory Therapeutic Area at Merck Serono in Geneva. Dr. Kaszubska started her career in discovery research at Abbott Laboratories in Chicago in the metabolic disease area. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

104 VALUE PROPOSITION AND INNOVATIVE MODELS In total, she has more than 15 years of experience in the global pharma- ceutical industry across all phases of drug development. Dr. Kaszubska holds a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Illinois and a B.S. in chemistry from The University of Chicago. Seema Kumar, M.Sc., is the vice president of Innovation, Global Health, and Science Policy Communication at Johnson & Johnson (J&J). In this role, Ms. Kumar works to position J&J as a global pioneer in innovation and in research and development (R&D) and as a partner of choice. Her responsibilities include communications about enterprise innovation and R&D, medical safety and ethics, policy, and global health. She also serves as the communication leader for the Johnson & Johnson R&D Manage- ment Committee and for the Johnson & Johnson Innovation Centers. Ms. Kumar previously served at the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of J&J as the vice president of Enterprise Innovation and Global Health Com- munication and as the vice president of Global R&D Communications. Prior to joining J&J, Ms. Kumar was the chief communications officer at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Genome Research, the flagship center for the Human Genome Project. Ms. Kumar holds a master of arts in science journalism from the University of Maryland and completed a fellowship at the National Cancer Institute. She received a bachelor of science and communication from the University of Maryland and a bachelor of sci- ence in physics from Stella Maris College in Madras, India. Oren J. Schlein, J.D., brings 20 years of experience as an attorney and a philanthropic adviser to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), where, as senior adviser for Global Philanthropy, he leads the organiza- tion’s global foundations portfolio, including the strategic refresh of the UNICEF/Gates Foundation partnership. He is committed to maximiz- ing the social impact of philanthropic investments through innovative partnerships grounded in high-impact interventions that are measurable, cost-effective, sustainable, and scalable. After an early career as a bank- ing and corporate attorney, Mr. Schlein moved into the development field and first worked for the United Nations Association, the largest advocacy organization that supports United Nations causes in the United States. In the mid-2000s, as senior adviser for the United Nations Development Pro- gramme in the Maldives, Mr. Schlein led efforts to mobilize private and public resources in response to the 2004 Asian tsunami. In the late 1990s, he served as executive director of the international Adopt-A-Minefield® Campaign, which gained widespread public attention through the sup- port of its Goodwill Ambassador, Sir Paul McCartney. Mr. Schlein holds PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 105 a juris doctor from the Boston University School of Law and a bachelor of arts in international relations from Johns Hopkins University. He is fluent in French and conversant in Mandarin Chinese. Gaudenz Silberschmidt, M.D., D.T.M.P.H., M.A., joined the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2012 as an advisor to the Director-General on reform issues. He was appointed the director for Partnerships and Non-State Actors in February 2015, responsible for the process leading to the adoption of the Framework of Engagement with Non-State Actors, and he acted as the director of Coordinated Resource Mobilization from 2014–2017. Before joining WHO, he was the Swiss Ambassador for Global Health, heading the International Affairs Division of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health from 2003–2012. Dr. Silberschmidt received his medical degree from the University of Zurich, holds a master’s degree in international relations from the University of St. Gallen and a diploma in tropical medicine and public health from the Swiss Tropical Institute in Basel. Peter Singer, OC, M.D., M.P.H., FRSC, is the special advisor to Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the current director-general of the World Health Organization. He is also a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto and was chief executive officer of Grand Challenges Canada. In 2011, Dr. Singer was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to health research and bioethics and for his dedication to improving health in developing countries. In 2007, he received the Michael Smith Prize as Canada’s Health Researcher of the Year in Popu- lation Health and Health Services. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, and the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World. Rebecca Stevens is the head of Access Partnerships and Public Affairs at Novartis Social Business. Wendy Taylor, M.P.P., is a fellow at The Rockefeller Foundation. Mary Lou Valdez, M.S.M., is the associate commissioner for international programs at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) where she leads the Office of International Programs staff in China, Europe, India, and Latin America and at FDA headquarters. She is responsible for cata- lyzing FDA global engagement in collaboration with FDA centers and offices, international health and regulatory partners, ministries of health PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

106 VALUE PROPOSITION AND INNOVATIVE MODELS and agriculture, other U.S. government agencies, industry, academia, multilateral organizations, and related stakeholders. Bruce Wilkinson, M.B.A., is the chief executive officer of the Catholic Medical Mission Board (CMMB). To the field of global poverty alleviation, he brings deep experiential understanding of and commitment to individ- ual empowerment in support of sustainable solutions. His strategic and operational experiences span 30 years in Africa, 7 years in Washington, DC, and 3 years in Europe across sectors of applied linguistics, education, maternal and child health, humanitarian assistance, economic develop- ment, agriculture, and HIV/AIDS. Inspired as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana and by his time at the Summer Institute of Linguistics in Mali, he has acquired expertise in virtually all areas within CMMB’s focus, includ- ing volunteerism, work with gifts-in-kind and corporate engagement, and programming for maternal and child health. During his 25 years at World Vision, he was instrumental in mobilizing the U.S. commitment toward The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief; served as chief of party for the 5-year, $250 million, U.S. Agency for International Development–funded RAPIDS initiative, which cared for 260,000 Zam- bian orphans and vulnerable children; led nine country programs with an annual budget of $450–$600 million; and established a strong track record in policy influence for developing countries. He has a B.A. in economics from Gordon College and an M.B.A. in international management from Cambridge University, England, with additional diploma studies in lin- guistics, French, and anthropology. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Value Proposition and Innovative Models for Multi-Sectoral Engagement in Global Health: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $45.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

To explore value proposition for different sectors that engage in global health - including industry, government, philanthropy, and civil society - and innovative models for multi-sectoral collaboration, the Forum on Public-Private Partnerships for Global Health and Safety of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 2-day workshop on November 15 and 16, 2018. With a specific focus on industry engagement, the workshop examined how stakeholders within industry define and measure value relative to global health as well as how and why other sectors in the global health community engage with industry. This publication summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!