National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Vital Federal Role in Meeting the Highway Innovation Imperative (2019)

Chapter: APPENDIX: Committee Biographical Information

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Page 113
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Vital Federal Role in Meeting the Highway Innovation Imperative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25511.
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Vital Federal Role in Meeting the Highway Innovation Imperative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25511.
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Vital Federal Role in Meeting the Highway Innovation Imperative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25511.
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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Vital Federal Role in Meeting the Highway Innovation Imperative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25511.
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100 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs APPENDIX Committee Biographical Information Timothy A. Henkel, Chair, is Assistant Commissioner for Modal Planning and Program Management in the Minnesota Department of Transportation. In this position he manages the Offices of Asset Management, Passenger Rail, Transportation System Management, Freight and Commercial Vehicle Operations, Transit, Aeronautics, Transportation Data and Analysis, and Research. His more than 35-year career in transportation includes working with local government, the private sector, executive leadership of multimodal planning, program management, and project development and delivery. He has been a member of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Standing Committee on Planning and several National Cooperative Highway Research Program panels. He earned a bachelor’s of science degree from Bemidji State University and a certificate in civil engineering and land surveying from Dunwoody College. Kimberly L. Avery is Deputy Chief Engineer of the Michigan Department of Transportation’s (MDOT’s) Bureau of Field Services. In this position she is responsible for managing and overseeing strategic planning and operations of development functions; specifically, Construction Field Services, Operations Field Services, Office of Safety and Security Administration, and Office of Research. She began her career at MDOT in 1989 as a general engineer and has assumed positions of increasing responsibility. She is active in a number of transportation organizations, serving a member of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Committee on Highways and Streets, President of the Michigan Chapter of the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (COMTO), and member of the Governors Traffic and Safety Council. She has been a member of the National Cooperative Highway Research Program Panel on Resilience in Transportation Planning, Engineering, Management, Policy, and Administration. She was recipient of the 2016 COMTO National Women Who Move the Nation Chairman’s Eagle Award, the 2015 COMTO Michigan Chapter Transportation Pioneer of the Year Award, and the 2010 MDOT Directors Award. She earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Valparaiso University. Peter Capon is Vice President of Materials and Product Development at Rieth-Riley Construction. Since joining the company more than 27 years ago, he has served in a number of quality control and material sciences positions from field technician to Corporate Quality Control and Environmental Director for the company’s asphalt, concrete, and aggregate plant and construction operations. He was involved in the development of many technical specifications for pavement quality control and is currently is a member of the Indiana Department of Transportation Hot Mix Asphalt Pavement Design Committee. He is chair of the Application Steering Committee of the National Center for Asphalt Technology, Auburn University, and chair of the Committee on Asphalt Research and Technology for the National Asphalt Pavement Association. He has served on a number of National Cooperative Highway Research Program panels on pavement topics. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota. Paul D. Degges is Deputy Commissioner and Chief Engineer of the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT), and is responsible for the design and implementation of all of the department’s engineering projects and management of 11 divisions and 4 regional offices. Since joining TDOT in

101 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 1988, he has held positions in the disciplines of field construction, roadway design, information systems, hydraulic design, and structures. He was previously Assistant Director of Construction, Director of Region 3 (Nashville), and Transportation Administrator, which supports the Chief Engineer. He serves as vice chair of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Highways. He is a member of several other AASHTO subcommittees including Asset Management and Performance Management. He serves on a committee for the National Center for Pavement Preservation and the Tennessee Technological Institute’s Dean of Engineering’s Strategic Direction Team and Advisory Board. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Tennessee Technological University and is a licensed engineer. William Heaslet is Vice President of Linehaul and Network Engineering for USF Holland, a regional, next-day service freight trucking company. In this capacity, he oversees all linehaul engineering for the carrier, responsible for designing and optimizing the company’s route and terminal network. Before joining USF Holland in 2017, he held a similar position at XPO logistics, formerly ConWay Freight, where he built a labor-management system for all dock and pickup and delivery operations. He held several positions of increasing responsibility in the strategic planning and engineering departments of Fedex. Before joining Fedex, he was Director of Operations and Engineering at AE Clevite, Inc., an automotive aftermarket distribution firm, where he directed the company’s logistics, packaging, warehousing, and engineering service offices. Mr. Heaslet served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1986 to 2007, both on active and reserve duty. He has served on panels for the Transportation Research Board’s Freight Cooperative Research Program. He earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the University of Memphis and master’s degree in business from Webster University. Chris T. Hendrickson (NAE) is the Hamerschlag University Professor Emeritus and Director of the Traffic21 Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His expertise is in engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, system performance, construction project management, finance, and computer applications. He has published numerous articles on computer-aided engineering, transportation systems, construction project management, and environmental systems. He pioneered models of dynamic traffic equilibrium, including time-of-day departure demand models. He was an early contributor to the development of probabilistic network analysis for lifeline planning after seismic events. With others at Carnegie Mellon’s Engineering Design Research Center, he developed an experimental building design system in the early 1990s that spanned initial concept through construction scheduling and animation. Since 1994, he has concentrated on green design, exploring the environmental life-cycle consequences of alternative product and process designs. He has received numerous awards, among them the Fenves Systems Research Award from the Institute of Complex Engineering Systems (2002), AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellowships (2000-2002), a Lucent/National Science Foundation Industrial Ecology Fellowship (1998), the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award (1994), the ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Award (1989), and a Rhodes Scholarship (1973). He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (2007). He is member of the Transportation Research Board Executive Committee and the National Academy of Engineering. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Stanford University, a master of philosophy degree in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

102 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs Leslie Jacobson is a Vice President and Senior ITS Manager for WSP. He has more than 40 years of experience in transportation engineering. He is involved with or manages tolling, managed lane, and ITS projects, particularly active traffic management, across the country. His expertise is in transportation systems management and operations policy, planning, standards, development, deployment, software development, and operations activities. He worked for the Washington State DOT for 22 years before joining WSP (Parsons Brinckerhoff) in 1999. He is a licensed professional engineer. He has chaired the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Regional Transportation Systems Management and Operations Committee and is a member of the TRB Freeway Operations Committee. He is a member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the Executive Committee for the Transportation Systems Management and Operation Council. He earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Washington and master’s degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Carol Kuester is Director of Electronic Payment Systems for the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and Bay Area Toll Authority, San Francisco, California. She is responsible for managing several high-profile customer service programs, including FasTrak®, the regional and statewide interoperable toll payment system and Clipper®, the multi-operator transit fare payment card. She oversees more than 2 million user accounts and $94 million in transactions monthly. She has held a number of other positions at MTC including Principal Program Coordinator, Senior Program Coordinator, and Associate Program Coordinator. Before joining MTC she was a senior associate at TransTec America Inc. in Hannover, Germany, a transportation planning consultant at Hamburg Consult, and a Fellow at the Robert Bosch Foundation in Bonn and Berlin, Germany. She is a Board Member of the Intelligent Transportation Society of California. She earned a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Davis. Christopher M. Puchalsky is Director of Policy and Strategic Initiatives in the Office of Transportation and Infrastructure Sustainability, City of Philadelphia. He was previously Director of Transportation Planning for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC). At DVRPC he lead four separate offices responsible for transportation planning across modes and scales—Office of Corridor Planning, Office of Transit, Bicycle, and Pedestrian Planning, Office of Travel Monitoring, and Office of Modeling and Analysis. He began his progression at DVRPC in 2007 as a Senior Transportation Engineer; Manager, Modeling and Analysis; Associate Director, Technical Services; and then Associate Director, Systems Planning. Prior to DVPRC he was an independent consultant in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Mexico City and a Design Research Engineer for the Ford Motor Company. He has been an adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo and was a transportation planning methods lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from Temple University, and earned his Ph.D. in transportation systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Rosalie Ruegg is Consultant and Managing Director of Technology Impact Assessment (TIA) Consulting, Inc. She has more than 35 years of experience in economic impact assessment of advanced technologies. Prior to founding TIA Consulting, she was Director of the Advanced Technology Program’s Economic Assessment Office of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In this capacity, she developed and implemented a comprehensive evaluation program and served on the boards

103 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs responsible for selecting research and development (R&D) projects for more than $1 billion in federal awards. She was a senior economist in NIST’s Center for Applied Mathematics, where she led an award- winning, multi-sector economic impact study for Congress. Earlier, she was a financial economist for the Federal Reserve System’s Board of Governors. She has more than 60 publications, among them a case study guide for science managers and an economics textbook. She was the principal author for the Overview of Evaluation Methods for R&D Programs for the U.S. Department of Energy. As a member of the Federal Senior Executive Service, she received the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Gold Medal for excellence. In 2001, she was the recipient of the Institute of Industrial Engineers’ Wellington Award for outstanding contributions in the field of engineering economics. She earned degrees in economics from the University of North Carolina and the University of Maryland and an M.B.A. from American University. Theodore Zoli is National Bridge Chief Engineer at HNTB Corporation. He is a structural engineer with expertise in long-span, cable-supported bridges. At HNTB, he played a key role in the creation of a number of bold contemporary structures, from the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge in Boston to the Lake Champlain bridge between New York and Vermont. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, he focused on developing protective strategies to retrofit iconic bridges to maintain their structural integrity against the possibility of damage from explosion. His work has also focused on developing design principles for the construction of robust new landmark structures. He has served as a visiting lecturer in Princeton University’s Department of Civil Engineering and as an adjunct professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at Columbia University. In 2009, he was named a MacArthur Fellow, granted for major technological advances to protect transportation infrastructure and for his innovative designs. In 2012, he was selected as Engineering News-Record’s Award of Excellence winner, considered to be one of the construction industry’s most prestigious honors. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and a master’s degree from the California Institute of Technology.

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TRB Special Report 331 concludes that with sustained and adequate funding and modest improvements in research, development, and technology (RD&T), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office (ITS JPO) will continue to serve and advance the national interest and international competitiveness well into the future.

TRB’s Research and Technology Coordinating Committee, which produced the report, believes that rapidly advancing technology, new mobility services, increased urbanization, and the growing frequency of severe weather events are changing highway transportation in fundamental ways.

FHWA and ITS JPO RD&T programs, as required by Congress, are addressing a number of critical gaps not covered by other programs. And they are conducting nationally significant research, but there are compelling policy and operational issues that could justify even greater levels of RD&T investment by the two programs. Detailed future RT&D suggestions are outlined in this report, touching on a variety of issues that include autonomous-vehicle technology, energy and sustainability, growing and changing populations, resilience, goods movement, safety, and equity.

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