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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
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Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
×
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
×
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25726.
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C Committee Members and Staff Biographical Information SARAH GIBSON, Co-Chair, is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, at the High Altitude Observatory (HAO). Dr. Gibson is also head of the Long-Term Solar Variability (LSV) Section of HAO. Her positions prior to her arrival at HAO included a 1 year visit to Cambridge University as a North Atlantic Treaty Organization/National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow, and nearly 4 years at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center—first as a National Research Council associate and then as a research assistant professor at the Catholic University of America. Dr. Gibson’s research centers on solar drivers of the terrestrial environment, from short-term space weather drivers such as coronal mass ejections (with emphasis on precursor magnetic structure) to long-term solar cycle variation (with emphasis on the Sun-Earth system at solar minimum). She has led and coordinated international working groups on both of these subjects for the International Space Science Institute and International Astronomical Union. Dr. Gibson was the recipient of the American Astronomical Society-SPD Karen Harvey Prize. She is currently a member of the Next Generation Solar Physics Mission Study Team and a member of the Steering Committee of International Astronomical Union Division E (Sun and Heliosphere) and the Solar Physics Journal Editorial Board, and in past years was a scientific editor for the Astrophysical Journal and served on the Heliophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council and the AURA Solar Observatory Council. Dr. Gibson obtained her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is a member of the Space Studies Board, and she previously served on the National Academies Committee for a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics) and the Standing Committee on Solar and Space Physics. MAURA E. HAGAN, Co-Chair, is the dean of the College of Science and a professor of physics at Utah State University. Dr. Hagan’s research interests are the physics of the upper atmosphere, including chemical and dynamical coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere; atmospheric tides and waves; electrodynamic coupling between ionospheric plasma and the neutral atmosphere; and the effects of global change, meteorological disturbances, and space weather on the middle and upper atmosphere. Previously, she was interim director and senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Hagan is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS). She earned her Ph.D. in physics from Boston College. BRIAN J. ANDERSON is a principal professional staff physicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and supervisor of the space physics research group. Dr. Anderson has management experience with a number of missions, including serving as instrument scientist for NEAR Magnetometer, instrument scientist for MESSENGER Magnetometer, MESSENGER advance science planning lead/deputy project scientist, principal investigator for the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), spacecraft cleanliness lead for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission, and SRP magnetic fields section supervisor and SRP group supervisor through 2017, and regular staff member since that time. He has extensive experience in space magnetometry, spacecraft magnetics, and basic space plasma physics, with concentrations in pulsations, currents, wave-particle interactions and geomagnetic storms. Dr. Anderson has conducted data analysis of AMPTE/CCE 27

magnetic field data and data validation and was the archiving, data processing, and analysis lead for UARS magnetic field data. Previously, he served as IAGA Division III Head and GRL SPA section editor. Dr. Anderson earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota. He has served on the National Academies Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics), the Panel on Solar Wind-Magnetospheric Interactions, and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. STEVEN J. BATTEL is the president of Battel Engineering. He has 41 years of experience as a consultant, engineer, and manager in multiple aerospace and scientific disciplines. He is also an adjunct professor of practice in two departments at the University of Michigan. Mr. Battel’s areas of specialization include program management, systems engineering, precision electronics design, scientific instrument design, spacecraft avionics, power systems technology development, technology assessment, and technology costing methods. He is a recognized expert on low-noise instrumentation, space power systems, and space high-voltage systems, especially for systems intended for operation in a planetary environment. He is a fellow of the AIAA and the AAAS, and a member of the NASA Engineering and Safety Council for both the Power and Avionics teams. Mr. Battel has served as a Red Team or IRT member for more than 90 NASA and NOAA missions and is a current member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He earned his B.S.E.E. in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan. Mr. Battel has served on the National Academies Report Review Committee, the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and the Committee on the Continuous Improvement of NASA’s Innovation Ecosystem—A Workshop and Meeting of Experts, and he previously served as a member of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics and the Committee on the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space. REBECCA L. BISHOP is a senior research scientist at The Aerospace Corporation in the Space Science Application Laboratory. At The Aerospace Corporation, Dr. Bishop has led the design, building, and testing of a CubeSat capable GPS Radio Occultation (RO) sensor to measure ionospheric density and scintillation. She is the principal investigator (PI) of a CubeSat mission to study a nighttime feature in the ionosphere/thermosphere. Dr. Bishop has provided GPS RO sensors on three CubeSat/Nanosat missions and is preparing for a fourth. She also oversaw the miniaturization of an Ionization Gauge sensor for placement on an NSF-funded CubeSat. Dr. Bishop was the Aerospace PI for the joint Naval Research Lab/Aerospace RAIDS experiment on the International Space Station. In addition, she has been a part of several sounding-rocket experiments. Dr. Bishop’s research interests include mid- and low-latitude ionospheric dynamics and instabilities, the response of the ionosphere from coupling to the thermosphere, and the reaction of the ionosphere to other regions above and below the ionosphere as well as its influence on those regions. Dr. Bishop explores how the dynamics of the ionosphere impacts operational and civil systems such as GPS navigation and communication systems. One of her areas of interest is to improve communication between the science community and end users in order to better inform users of the potential impacts of the space environment on their technology. Previously, Dr. Bishop was a research associate at Clemson University, where she analyzed chemical tracers released from sounding rockets to extract the neutral wind altitude profiles in the lower thermosphere. She earned her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas, Dallas. Dr. Bishop has no prior National Academies service. MARK C. M. CHEUNG is a senior staff physicist at Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, with research interests in astrophysical plasmas, radiative magnetohydrodynamics, solar and stellar activity, and the origins of space weather in the near-Earth environment. As PI for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, PI for one of NASA’s Heliophysics Grand Challenges Research grants, and mentor for NASA’s Frontier Development Lab, Dr. Cheung leads teams of scientists and engineers who operate space telescopes, perform data mining and data analysis on terabyte- and petabyte-scale data archives, develop massively parallel numerical simulation codes for supercomputers, and apply machine learning techniques for scientific discovery. He is a co-investigator on NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Previously, Dr. Cheung was a 28

visiting scholar at Stanford University and a visiting associate professor at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Tokyo). He earned his Dr. rer. nat. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Göttingen, Germany. He has no prior National Academies service. CHRISTINA M. S. COHEN is a staff scientist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Dr. Cohen’s work at Caltech involves the design, calibration, and analysis of several energetic particle instruments; she is the principal investigator on the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission as well as co-investigator on the High-Energy Ion Telescope (HIT) on the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) mission, the Energetic Particle Instrument-High (EPI-Hi) on Parker Solar Probe, and the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE; a small satellite). Dr. Cohen is also a team member of the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) on ACE, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) on the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, and the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) on the Galileo mission. Her research currently focuses on the acceleration, transport, and properties of solar energetic particles in the heliosphere and their space weather implications, and previously has included energetic particle populations in the Jovian magnetosphere and the heavy ion composition of the solar wind. She routinely combines in situ particle measurements with remote sensing of flares, radio bursts, and coronal mass ejections in her analysis. Dr. Cohen is currently on the science advisory board for Eos and the president of the Space Physics and Aeronomy section of the AGU. She earned her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Cohen is a member of the National Academies U.S. National Liaison Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and the Panel on Physics of the Associateship Programs of Policy and Global Affairs. YUE DENG is a professor of physics at the University of Texas, Arlington. Previously, Dr. Deng was a research associate at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES). Dr. Deng is leading the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) project to develop next-generation simulation capability in ionosphere/thermosphere coupling at multiple scales for environmental specification and prediction. Her professional experience in space physics has involved developing a new three-dimensional (3D) nonhydrostatic ionosphere/thermosphere general circulation model (GCM) and investigating the nonhydrostatic processes in the upper atmosphere. Dr. Deng’s research interests include global 3D modeling of complex systems, solar and geomagnetic energy input uncertainty into the upper atmosphere, gravity-acoustic wave propagation, ionosphere-thermosphere coupling in multiple scales, data analysis, and planetary atmospheres. She is a recipient of an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award and of a Robert S. Hyer Research Award from the Texas Section of the American Physical Society. Dr. Deng earned her Ph.D. in space science from the University of Michigan. She has previously served on the National Academies Committee on Solar and Space Physics. TAI D. PHAN is a senior fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Space Sciences Laboratory. Dr. Phan is a co-investigator of the NASA Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission and is a science co-investigator of the FIELDS instrument on the Solar Probe Plus mission. He leads an interdisciplinary science team of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. Dr. Phan’s research interests include solar wind interaction with Earth’s magnetosphere and the magnetic reconnection process. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Phan earned his Ph.D. in engineering from Dartmouth College. He previously served as a member of the National Academies Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions Panel as part of the Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics), and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. TUIJA I. PULKKINEN is chair and professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering. Dr. Pulkinnen’s research interests cover 29

widely solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, storm and substorm dynamics, energy and plasma transport from the solar wind into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and auroral region electrodynamics and its coupling to the magnetosphere. Previously, she served as professor, vice president, and dean of the School of Electrical Engineering at the Aalto University in Espoo, Finland. Prior to her time at Aalto University, Dr. Pulkkinen was a scientist, unit head, and research professor at the Finnish Meteorological Institute in Helsinki, Finland. She received her Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Helsinki in 1992. She has been awarded the EGU Julius Bartels Medal, the AGU Fellowship and James B. Macelwane Medal, and Academia Europaea, and is an associate of the Royal Astronomical Society and Finnish Academy of Sciences and Letters. Dr. Pulkkinen earned her Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Helsinki. She has previously served on the National Academies Arctowski Medal Selection Committee. JIONG QIU is an associate professor at Montana State University in the Department of Physics. Dr. Qiu’s research interests include magnetic reconnection and energy release in solar eruptive events and the evolution of solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Previously, Dr. Qiu served as a researcher in the Department of Physics at New Jersey Institute of Technology, conducting research in solar physics as well as earthshine measurements of global atmospheric properties. She is a member of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope science working group. Dr. Qiu was the recipient of the Karen Harvey Prize of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society and was a recipient of a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics form Nanjing University in China. Dr. Qiu previously served on the National Academies Committee on Solar and Space Physics. HOWARD J. SINGER is chief scientist at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center and an adjunct professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Previously, Dr. Singer served as the chief of the Research and Development Division of the Space Environment Center (SEC). Dr. Singer has been the project leader for the current and future NOAA Space Environment Monitor instruments on the GOES spacecraft and the magnetometer responsible scientist on numerous GOES satellites and the joint USAF-NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects satellite. His research is in the area of solar-terrestrial interactions, ultra-low-frequency waves, Earth’s radiation belts, geomagnetic disturbances, storms, and substorms. Dr. Singer has had leadership roles in the transition of research to operations and has led the effort to transition a Geospace model into operations at SWPC. He has authored or co-authored over 300 publications and was co-editor of the 2001 AGU Geophysical Monograph, Space Weather. Dr. Singer has received awards from the Air Force, NASA, and NOAA, including the Department of Commerce Gold Medal for Leadership, and he is the recipient of the Antarctica Service Medal for spending more than 1 year at South Pole Station, Antarctica, where he has a geographic feature named for him. Dr. Singer received his Ph.D. in space physics and geophysics from UCLA. He is currently on the NSF Geospace Environment Modeling Steering Committee, recently served as editor and Editor’s Choice editor of Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications. Dr. Singer has served on various NASA and NSF committees, including the NASA Living with a Star Geospace Mission Definition Team and the NSF Geospace Section Portfolio Review. He previously served on the National Academy of Sciences 2003 Solar and Space Physics Survey Panel on Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Interactions, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and the 2013 NAS Steering Committee for a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics. Dr. Singer is currently serving on the National Academies Committee on Solar and Space Physics and the Space Studies Board. LEONARD STRACHAN, JR., is an astrophysicist at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C. At NRL, Dr. Strachan is the principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Spectro- Coronagraph (UVSC) Pathfinder, an instrument that will demonstrate a new capability for early detection of space weather events. His research interests include developing techniques and instrumentation for the 30

remote sensing of the solar corona and source regions of the solar wind. Previously, Dr. Strachan was at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, where he was a member of the team that developed the ultraviolet coronagraphs for the Spartan 201 shuttle missions and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). For this work, he received three NASA group achievement awards (Spartan 201). He earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. Dr. Strachan previously served on the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, the Committee on the Societal and Economic Impacts of Severe Space Weather Events Workshop, and the Workshop Organizing Committee on Solar Systems Radiation Environment, and on a committee for NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration. BARBARA J. THOMPSON is an astrophysicist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the Heliophysics Science Division. Dr. Thompson has devoted the majority of her research efforts to the study of solar eruptions and associated phenomena. Her current research efforts focus on the field of space weather, understanding how the Sun’s magnetic variations affect geospace. She serves as deputy project scientist for the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, is a senior forecaster at Goddard Space Weather Research Laboratory, and serves as principal investigator of Goddard Data Analytics and Machine Learning task group. She has a great deal of experience in analyzing data from multiple sources, and authored or co-authored more than 100 refereed papers, including dozens of papers combining observations with model interpretations. Previously, Dr. Thompson served as the executive secretary for the International Living With a Star program and the director of operations for the International Heliophysical Year program. She has received more than a dozen NASA awards for mission development, operations, science, and community service. Dr. Thompson earned her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She previously served on the National Academies Committee on Solar and Space Physics. STAFF ABIGAIL A. SHEFFER is a senior program officer with the Space Studies Board (SSB). In fall 2009, Dr. Sheffer served as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow for the National Academies and then joined the SSB. Since coming to the National Academies, she has been the staff officer and study director on a variety of activities such as the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, Open Source Software Policy Options for NASA Earth and Space Sciences, Strategic Investments in Instrumentation and Facilities for Extraterrestrial Sample Curation and Analysis, and Achieving Science with CubeSats: Thinking Inside the Box, among others. Dr. Sheffer earned her Ph.D. in planetary science from the University of Arizona and A.B. in geosciences from Princeton University. MIA BROWN joined the Space Studies Board (SSB) as a research associate in 2016. She comes to the SSB with experience in both the civil and military space sectors and has primarily focused on policies surrounding U.S. space programs in the international sector. Some of these organizations include NASA’s Office of International and Interagency Relations, Arianespace, the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (Austria), and the U.S. Department of State. From 2014 to 2015, Ms. Brown was the managing editor of the International Affairs Review. She received her M.A. in international space policy from the Space Policy Institute at the Elliott School of International Affairs. Prior to entering the Space Policy Institute, Ms. Brown received her M.A. in historical studies from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where she concentrated in the history of science, technology, and medicine and defended a thesis on the development of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. MEGAN CHAMBERLAIN, senior project assistant, joined the Space Studies Board (SSB) and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) in September 2019. Ms. Chamberlain began her career at the National Academies in 2007 working for the Transportation Research Board in the Cooperative Research Programs. She has assisted with meeting facilitation and administrative support of 31

hundreds of research projects over the course of her career. Ms. Chamberlain attended the University of the District of Columbia and majored in psychology.  SARAH MORAN is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Previously, Ms. Moran completed her undergraduate studies in Astrophysics and Science & Public Policy at Barnard College of Columbia University. In her graduate research, she is studying planets around other stars, which are known as exoplanets. Through laboratory experiments and computer models, Ms. Moran investigates clouds and hazes in exoplanets to figure out how they affect the overall atmosphere and how they impact habitability. She also works closely with observational astronomers to help them interpret her theoretical and experimental cloud and haze results in the context of transiting exoplanet observations. Ms. Moran is passionate about science communication and science policy and is very pleased to have joined the Space Studies Board in fall 2019 to gain insight into and learn how to strengthen the connections between scientists, policy makers, and the public. COLLEEN HARTMAN is the director of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) and the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Hartman has served in various senior positions, including acting associate administrator, deputy director of technology, and director of solar system exploration at NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and deputy assistant administrator at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dr. Hartman was instrumental in developing innovative approaches to powering space probes destined for the farthest reaches of the solar system, including in‐space propulsion and nuclear power and propulsion. She also gained administration and congressional approval for an entirely new class of competitively selected missions called New Frontiers, to explore the planets, asteroids, and comets in the solar system. Dr. Hartman has built and launched balloon and spacecraft payloads, worked on robotic vision, and served as program manager for dozens of space missions, including the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Data from the COBE spacecraft gained two NASA‐sponsored scientists the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. Dr. Hartman earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology from Pomona College, Claremont, California, a master’s in public administration from the University of Southern California, and a doctorate in physics from the Catholic University of America. She started her career as a presidential management intern under President Ronald Reagan. Her numerous awards include the Claire Booth Luce Fellowship in Science and Engineering, the NASA Outstanding Performance Award, and multiple Presidential Rank Awards, one of the highest awards bestowed by the President of the United States to senior executives. 32

Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division Get This Book
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Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Agile Responses to Short-Notice Rideshare Opportunities for the NASA Heliophysics Division explores the kinds of solar and space science that would be enabled by an agile response to rideshare opportunities. This report then explores the types of payloads that are suited to these opportunities and the development and implementation of a new program that would allow agile responses to future short-notice rideshare opportunities.

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