National Academies Press: OpenBook

Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels (2020)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographies of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25821.
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Page 133
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25821.
×
Page 134
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25821.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographies of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25821.
×
Page 136

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Appendix C Biographies of Committee Members ANNE R. KAPUSCINSKI (Chair) is director of the Coastal Science and Policy Program and professor of the Environmental Studies Department at the Univer- sity of California, Santa Cruz. Her current research aims to shift aquaculture, the world’s fastest-growing food sector, toward sustainability. Her past research examined impacts of dams, fish hatcheries, aquaculture, and genetic engineering on fish conservation. Dr. Kapuscinski previously served as the inaugural Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor of Sustainability Science and former chair of the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth College. Prior to Dartmouth, while a professor of fisheries and conservation biology at the University of Minnesota, she led the development of and 2007 launch of an interdisciplinary undergraduate minor in sustainability studies. She participates actively in the sci- ence-policy interface, presently as chair of the Board of Directors of the Union of Concerned Scientists and as a member of the California Ocean Protection Council Science Advisory Team, and has been a scientific advisor to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture (under three administrations), U.S. Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Global Environment Facility, European Union Food Safety Agency, and state of Minnesota, and has served on four U.S. National Academy of Sciences committees. Dr. Kapuscinski received her B.A. in biology from Swarthmore Col- lege and her M.S. and Ph.D. in fisheries from Oregon State University. ARUN AGRAWAL (NAS) is Samuel Trask Dana Professor at the School for the Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan. His re- search and teaching emphasize the politics of international development, in- stitutional change, and environmental conservation. He has written critically 133

134 APPENDIX C on Indigenous knowledge, community-based conservation, common property, population and resources, and environmental identities. Since 2013, Dr. Agrawal has served as the editor-in-chief of World Development, and his recent work has appeared in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Conservation Biology, and Development and Change, among other journals. Preceding his work at the University of Michigan, Dr. Agrawal held teaching and research positions at Yale University; University of Florida; McGill University; University of California, Berkeley; and Harvard University, among others. Dr. Agrawal received his Ph.D. in political science (1992) from Duke University. CHRISTOPHER BOONE is dean of the College of Global Futures and profes- sor in the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University (ASU). His re- search contributes to ongoing debates in sustainable urbanization, environmental justice, vulnerability, and global environmental change. At ASU, he has taught classes on sustainable urbanization, urban and environmental health, principles and methods of sustainability, environmental justice, interdisciplinary methods for socio-ecological research, and sustainable design (Innovation Space). Dr. Boone earned his Ph.D. in geography (1994) from the University of Toronto. ERIN BROMAGHIM serves as the director of Olympic and Paralympic De- velopment in the Office of the Mayor of the City of Los Angeles. In this role, Ms. Bromaghim is focused on realizing the city’s plans to make Los Angeles more sustainable, inclusive, resilient, and innovative as they prepare to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2028. This legacy includes her work as a Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Fellow, through which she uses the framework of the United Nation’s Agenda 2030 to align, measure, and track the city’s progress toward the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. She previously served as a senior civilian with the U.S. Air Force, where she managed multiple complex defense, intelligence, and security reform efforts over nearly 14 years with the Defense Department. Ms. Bromaghim entered federal civil service as a Presidential Man- agement Fellow with the U.S. Navy, later working for the Office of the Secretary of Defense and NATO. She received her B.A. from Wake Forest University and an M.A. from Georgetown University, and completed additional studies at the University of Havana, Stanford University, and Harrison Metal. GARRICK E. LOUIS is associate professor of engineering systems and envi- ronment at the University of Virginia. He is director of the Small Infrastructure and Development Center. His research seeks to provide sustained access to basic human services, including water and sanitation, to developing communities. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in engineering and public policy. His honors include the 2000 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from the National Science Foundation, 2006–2007

APPENDIX C 135 American Association for the Advancement of Science Energy Environment and Natural Resources Fellow, 2014 Design and Health Faculty Fellow at the Univer- sity of Virginia, and 2015–2016 Jefferson Science Fellow in the Office of Global Food Security at the U.S. Department of State, and he is the Global Fulbright Specialist for the U.S. Department of State. DORCETA E. TAYLOR is a professor of environmental justice at Yale School of the Environment. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Taylor was a professor of en- vironmental sociology at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS). She served as the James E. Crowfoot Collegiate Chair of Environmental Justice and the director of diversity, equity, and inclusion at SEAS, and held a joint appointment with the Program in the Environment. Dr. Taylor is the former Field of Studies coordinator for SEAS’ Environmental Jus- tice Program and a past chair of the American Sociological Association’s Section on Environment and Technology. She received dual doctorates in sociology and forestry and environmental studies from Yale University in 1991, a master of arts and master of philosophy from Yale University in sociology and forestry and en- vironmental studies in 1988, and a master of forest science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 1985. Dr. Taylor is the recipient of several awards, including the National Audubon Society Women in Conservation Award, the Burton V. Barnes Award for Academic Excellence from the Michigan Chapter of the Sierra Club, the Charles Horton Cooley Award for Distinguished Scholarship from the Michigan Sociological Association, the Frederick B. Buttel Distinguished Contribution Award from the Section on Environment and Tech- nology of the American Sociological Association, and the William Freudenberg Lifetime Achievement Award of the Association for Environmental Sciences and Studies.

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Over the past decade there has been a growing interest in sustainability education in colleges and universities across the United States, with a marked increase in the number of undergraduate and graduate degree programs, research institutes, and centers focused on sustainability. Evidence-based core competencies for interdisciplinary sustainability programs can provide suitable guidance for curricular and program development, research, policy, communication, and pedagogical approaches at academic institutions. They can also serve as a guide for students to select academic programs and potential career options, a reference for employers to understand qualifications of graduates, and the foundation for a potential specialized accreditation for interdisciplinary sustainability programs. The growing demand for well-qualified sustainability professionals within the public, private, and nonprofit sectors also points to the value of developing core competencies.

Strengthening Sustainability Programs and Curricula at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels provides expert insights for strengthening the emerging discipline of sustainability in higher education in the United States. This report describes the local, national, and global landscape related to sustainability education; examines the history and current status of sustainability education programs in the United States and globally; discusses employment prospects for sustainability graduates in terms of the opportunities and the skills that employers seek; and addresses diversity, equity, and inclusion in sustainability-related education and employment.

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