National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters (2020)

Chapter: Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches

« Previous: Appendix D: Integrating Community Vulnerabilities into the Assessment of Disaster-Related Morbidity and Mortality: Two Illustrative Case Studies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 202
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 208

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

E Committee and Staff Biographical Sketches Ellen J. MacKenzie, Ph.D., Sc.M. (Chair), is the 11th dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. An expert on improving trauma care systems and policy, a nationally renowned researcher, and a respected academic leader, Dr. MacKenzie brings wide experience to her role as dean. After earning graduate degrees from the Bloomberg School, Dr. MacKenzie joined the school’s health policy and management faculty in 1980, with a joint appointment in the Department of Biostatistics. A Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, she holds faculty appointments in the school of medicine’s departments of orthopaedic surgery, emergency medicine, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. In 2018 she was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. MacKenzie founded and leads the Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium, a collaboration of more than 50 U.S. trauma centers and military treatment facilities. A the former director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, she has shaped the field of trauma services and outcomes research, leading to improved quality of life for trauma survivors. As a professor, department chair, and senior associate dean for academic affairs at the Bloomberg School, Dr. MacKenzie has distinguished herself as an inspired leader. As the health policy and management chair, Dr. MacKenzie enhanced practice as a part of the department’s mission, established a faculty development program that has served as a model for other departments, and facilitated the development of a core curriculum in policy. She also helped establish the Dr.P.H. cohort programs in Taiwan, Abu Dhabi, the Pacific Rim, the United Arab Emirates, and China. Sue Anne Bell, Ph.D., FNP-BC, NDHP-BC, is a nurse scientist and an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, with expertise in disaster response and emergency care. Her program of research examines the health effects of disasters and the impact of climate change on human health within a health equity framework. She is particularly interested in the long-term impact of disasters on human health, in developing policy that protects and promotes health throughout the disaster management cycle, and in the relationship among community resilience, health disparities, and disasters. Dr. Bell is clinically active in disaster response through the Department of Health and Human Services’ National Disaster Medical System with recent deployments to Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Maria, and the California wildfires. H. Russell Bernard, Ph.D., is the director of the Institute for Social Science Research at Arizona State University and an emeritus professor of the University of Florida. He is a cultural anthropologist specializing in technology and social change, language death, and social network analysis. His work in network analysis includes helping to develop the network scale-up method for estimating the size of uncountable populations. Dr. Bernard has done research or taught at universities in the United States, Mexico, Greece, Japan, and Germany. He is a former editor of Human Organization and the American Anthropologist and is the founder and the editor of the journal Field Methods. Dr. Bernard’s books include Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, Analyzing Qualitative Data: Systematic Approaches (with Gery Ryan), PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS E-1

E-2 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY and Native Ethnography (with Jesús Salinas Pedraza). Dr. Bernard was the 2003 recipient of the Franz Boas Award from the American Anthropological Association and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Aram Dobalian, Ph.D., J.D., M.P.H., is a professor in and the director of the Division of Health Systems Management and Policy at the University of Memphis. His research and consulting focus on access and quality of care during disasters and other crises, including work on community health resilience, crisis leadership, inpatient and outpatient quality metrics, healthcare facility evacuation, information technology in disasters, disaster behavioral health, and workforce readiness. He is a member of the Standing Committee on Medical and Public Health Research During Large-Scale Emergency Events of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Dobalian led the development of the first Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Comprehensive Emergency Management Program Evaluation and Research agenda in 2007–2008. In 2010 he became the founding director of the Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center (VEMEC), the only national research center focused on VA’s emergency management responsibilities to ensure timely access to high-quality care for veterans during crises and to improve the nation’s health preparedness for response to national emergencies, natural disasters, and terrorism. Dr. Dobalian has also examined end-of-life decision making and resource use in nursing homes, the role of pain in health care use, nursing home malpractice, the Nationwide Health Information Network Trial Implementation, veteran reintegration into civilian life, institutional review board quality, and nursing education. He led the national program evaluation of the VA Nursing Academy (VANA), a 5-year program consisting of 15 partnerships between VA hospitals and nursing schools. VANA, now named the Enhancing Academic Partnerships Program, promotes innovations in clinical nursing education and practice. He has taught classes on the U.S. health care system, health law, health policy, and health ethics and is a member of the State Bar of California. Marcella F. Fierro, M.D., Diplomate, ABP, AP, CP, FP, is the chief medical examiner emerita for the Commonwealth of Virginia. She was responsible for the oversight of medical examiner investigations of all violent, suspicious, and unnatural deaths in Virginia. She also served as a professor of pathology and a professor and the chair of the Department of Legal Medicine at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine from 1994 to 2008. She is a fellow and the past president of the National Association of Medical Examiners and served on its board of directors and the executive committee. Dr. Fierro is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and was a member of the Forensic Science Board for the Commonwealth. She has served as a consultant to the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the National Crime Information Center Unidentified and Missing Persons Files, and on federal panels and committees developing best practices in forensic identification and forensic medicine. Dr. Fierro served on the National Academies’ Committee on Science, Technology, and Law, which authored the report Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward. Dr. Fierro served on the board of directors of the Virginia Institute of Forensic Science and Medicine. She has published in professional journals, has edited texts, contributed chapters to several books, and presented at national and international meetings. Dr. Fierro serves as a reviewer for the American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology. In retirement, Dr. Fierro continues to consult on forensic death-related matters with a special passion for reuniting the many unidentified dead in our nation with their searching families. She also consulted with the PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX E E-3 Virginia Institute on a grant developing tools for recruiting physicians to enter forensic pathology as a career choice. Elizabeth Frankenberg, Ph.D., is the Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor of Sociology and the director of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina. Dr. Frankenberg’s research focuses on individual and family response to change and the role of community, broadly construed, in individual behaviors and outcomes across the life course. In addition to these substantive interests two cross-cutting themes are inherent in her research: health status as a critical dimension of well-being and the close integration of methods and data. She has developed and implemented innovative and ambitious designs for data collection to support her own research and that of the scientific and policy communities more broadly. One of these project, the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery (STAR), which is ongoing, assesses the social, economic, demographic, and health impacts of the December 26, 2004, earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia. It provides unique data measuring population-level response to a disaster over a long period of time. Dr. Frankenberg is trained in demography, sociology, and public policy. She has held social science staff positions at RAND, faculty appointments in the departments of sociology and community health sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, and faculty appointments in the Sanford School of Public Policy and in sociology at Duke. John L. Hick, M.D., is a faculty emergency physician at Hennepin Healthcare and a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the deputy medical director for Hennepin County emergency medical services and the medical director for Emergency Preparedness at the Hennepin County Medical Center. He served the Minnesota Department of Health as the medical director for the Office of Emergency Preparedness until becoming an advisor to the director of occupational and environmental medicine at the office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at the Department of Health and Human Services, where he is the lead editor for the TRACIE healthcare disaster preparedness website. He is the founder and past chair of the Minneapolis/St. Paul Metropolitan Hospital Compact, a 32-hospital mutual aid and planning group active since 2002. Dr. Hick is a national speaker on hospital preparedness issues and has published numerous papers dealing with hospital preparedness for contaminated casualties, personal protective equipment, crisis standards of care, and surge capacity. He was honored to serve the Institute of Medicine/National Academies on the Crisis Standards of Care projects as well as the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. Ali S. Khan, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Khan is a retired assistant surgeon general and the former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. He has served on several key CDC leadership positions overseeing programs including pandemic influenza, special pathogens, malaria, and other infectious diseases. Dr. Khan led the development of a number of innovative information projects including BioFusion, Red Sky, Dragon Fire, and the national health security preparedness index. He has had extensive national and global public emergency response leadership experience for Hurricane Katrina, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the Asian tsunami, anthrax, Rift Valley Fever, and influenza. Dr. Khan has served on White House PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

E-4 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY committees on food safety and health security and serves on the steering committee for the World Health Organization Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network. As part of that network he most recently was called upon to help the Pacific Island nations respond to a measles outbreak with prior deployments for Ebola in West Africa and the Rohingya humanitarian crisis in Bangladesh. Apart from being an author of more than 100 scientific articles and many policy briefs, Dr. Khan is known to the public for his recent book The Next Pandemic where he describes his firsthand experience with deadly infectious disease. He is an expert on health systems and politics surrounding these systems and on anticipating prevention and treatment of emerging and re-emerging infectious disease. Maureen Lichtveld, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor and the Freeport McMoRan Chair on Environmental Policy at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, as well as the director of the Center for Gulf Coast Environmental Health Research, Leadership, and Strategic Initiatives, and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Her research focuses on environmentally induced disease, health disparities, environmental health policy, disaster preparedness, public health systems, and community resilience. With more than 35 years of environmental public health experience, Dr. Lichtveld carries out national and global environmental health research that examines the cumulative impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on communities facing environmental health threats, disasters, and health disparities. Dr. Lichtveld is a member of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine; National Academies’ Board on Global Health; and National Academies’ Climate Communications Initiative Advisory Board. She was elected to the Board of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and serves on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Lichtveld was a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s scientific advisory board and the health disparities subcommittee at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); the past chair of the editorial board of the American Journal of Public Health; and past president of Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools. Other recognitions include the Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars, CDC’s Environmental Health Scientist of the Year, and Woman of the Year, New Orleans. Charles Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A. (retired), formerly served as the director for the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). He came to federal government service in 1987 as the associate director of NCHS responsible for information technology (IT) and information services of the center, and in 2003 he became the Center’s director of vital statistics. Before entering federal service, Mr. Rothwell spent 13 years in the state health department in North Carolina and became the first director of the State Center for Health Statistics. He was responsible for health statistics, public health IT, and statewide public health planning activities, and he served as an adjunct assistant professor of biostatistics at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina’s Health Services Research Center. Over the years, he has been involved with health statistics and IT activities of the U.S. Agency for International Development, the United Nations, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He also served as a legislative assistant for Senator Lieberman, working health and education issues. Mr. Rothwell served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, reaching the rank of captain. He received his B.S. in physics from the Virginia Military Institute, a master of science in operations research and PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX E E-5 systems analysis from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a master of business administration from the University of Maryland. Mr. Rothwell is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and in February 2013 was selected as one of the five Top Leaders in Federal Service. Richard Serino is the former deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and chief of Boston emergency management services (EMS), and is currently a distinguished senior fellow among the Harvard National Preparedness Leadership Initiative (NPLI) faculty. In this role he participates in the NPLI’s education and research initiatives. Mr. Serino also serves as a senior advisor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Urban Risk Lab. Mr. Serino brings more than 40 years of experience in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery as well as mass casualty incidents and leadership and innovation in government. He has received more than 35 local, national, and international awards for public service and innovation, including the NPLI’s Meta-Leader of the Year Award for his work in the response to Super Storm Sandy. At the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mr. Serino worked directly with Administrator Craig Fugate to build, sustain, and improve the department’s capacity to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. Mr. Serino has more than 35 years of state and local emergency management and emergency medical services experience. Prior to his appointment to FEMA, he served as the chief of Boston EMS and the assistant director of the Boston Public Health Commission. In that role he bolstered the city’s response plans for major emergencies, including chemical, biological, and radiological attacks. He also led citywide planning for H1N1 influenza. Mr. Serino has served as an incident commander for more than 35 mass casualty incidents and for all of Boston’s major planned events, including the Boston Marathon, Boston’s Fourth of July celebration, First Night, and the 2004 Democratic National Convention. He began working for Boston EMS in 1973; over the years, he rose through the ranks, and in 1999 became chief of the department. During his tenure as chief he has seen the agency expand and improve to become nationally recognized for the first-rate services provided by the agency’s emergency medical technicians and paramedics. Since 1998 Mr. Serino has been a national faculty member for the Domestic Preparedness Program. He was an original contributing member for the Defense Department’s Domestic Preparedness Training Program and Metropolitan Medical Response System. Mr. Serino has been involved, since its inception, with the Lessons Learned Information Sharing network for emergency responders. As a consultant to the Pentagon and the defense department, he served on the 9/11 after-action team to assess medical consequence management policies and procedures. Mr. Serino attended Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government Senior Executives in State and Local Government program in 2000, completed the Kennedy School’s National Preparedness Leadership Initiative in 2005, and graduated from the Executive Leadership Program, Center for Homeland Defense and Security at the Naval Postgraduate School. Michael A. Stoto, Ph.D., is a professor of health systems administration and population health at Georgetown University as well as a statistician, epidemiologist, and health services researcher. He also holds adjunct faculty appointments in the Department of Family Medicine, the Georgetown University Law Center, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Stoto’s research includes methodological topics in epidemiology and statistics including systematic reviews/meta-analysis and other analytical methods for comparative effectiveness research, community health assessment, evaluation methods, and performance measurement. His PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

E-6 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY substantive research interests include public health practice, especially with regard to emergency preparedness; drug and vaccine safety; infectious disease policy; and ethical issues in research and public health practice. Dr. Stoto is an expert on population health and public health assessment and the associate director of the population health scholars program in the Georgetown University School of Medicine. His work in this area has included systems-oriented evaluations of public health surveillance systems at the local to global level, addressing both statistical methods and public health practice issues. Dr. Stoto has developed methods for evaluating community health assessments and performance measures and helped to develop community health needs assessments (CHNAs) in MedStar Georgetown University Hospital and the other hospitals in the MedStar system as well as state and local health departments in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Dr. Stoto is currently working on a national study to identify best practices for hospital and community CHNAs. Dr. Stoto is also an expert in public health systems research (PHSR), focusing on applying and developing rigorous mixed-methods approaches to studying and evaluating federal, state, and local public health systems. Much of Dr. Stoto’s recent PHSR work has focused on public health emergency preparedness, and he was the co-principal investigator of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center based at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Stoto’s work in this area has focused on regionalization in public health, the evaluation of biosurveillance methods, and the development of methods for assessing emergency preparedness capabilities based on exercises and actual events. Dr. Stoto is currently working with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the University of Bologna to develop a competency-based training program for public health emergency preparedness in the European Union. W. Craig Vanderwagen, M.D., is a member as well as a manager of East West Protection, LLC. Dr. Vanderwagen served for 28 years as a uniformed officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, retiring with the rank of rear admiral (upper half). He served for 25 years in the Indian Health Service. His last assignment was as the presidentially appointed and Senate-confirmed Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) at the Department of Health and Human Services. He also serves as a senior partner with Martin, Blanck, and Associates, a professional consulting firm located in Alexandria, Virginia. As the founding ASPR, he implemented federal legislation that established the ASPR as the principal leader for all federal public health and medical response activities to any deliberate or natural disasters in the United States. The legislation established a federal role in the development and use of human and other material assets in preparedness and response and also established systems for deploying and managing these assets in emergency situations. His position also gave him authority and oversight of the federal effort to develop and support a wide range of medical countermeasures (diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutic drugs and biologics) against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear as well as pandemic influenza threats. This oversight responsibility included scientific discovery, product development, licensure, acquisition, and deployment. Dr. Vanderwagen was responsible for the creation of operational plans to address 15 national threats (including biological threats such as anthrax, smallpox, and plague as well as threats from nuclear, radiation, and chemical devices and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes) supported by appropriate situational awareness, logistics, planning, training and exercises coordinated through the Secretary’s Command Center, an emergency operations center linked to all other federal, state, and local command centers. Dr. Vanderwagen received his PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX E E-7 doctor of medicine degree from the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. He completed his residency in family medicine at the University of New Mexico and is board certified in family practice medicine. He received his bachelor’s degree from Calvin College. Daniel Wall, RN, M.P.P.A., B.S.N., currently works for the City of Ventura as the emergency manager and was previously at the Ventura County Health Care Agency as a manager for 11 years. Mr. Wall recently finished a master’s degree in public policy and administration. He has been a registered nurse for 15 years and has been working in the medical field for more than 30 years. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and was a combat medic. Mr. Wall’s primary career experience has been in the field of emergency medicine as a nurse. Matthew Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the University of Colorado Center for Bioethics and Humanities. His career has included developing a research institute and training programs focusing on bioethics, professionalism, and policy issues (the American Medical Association’s [AMA’s] Institute for Ethics) and founding AMA’s Center for Patient Safety. His research has focused on novel uses of survey data to inform and improve the practical management of ethical issues in health care and public policy. He has led projects on a wide variety of topics related to ethics and professionalism, including understanding and measuring the ethical climate of health care organizations and systems; ethics and quality improvement; communication, team-based care, and engaging patients as members of the team; defining physician professionalism; public health and disaster ethics; medicine and the Holocaust (with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum); and inequities in health and health care. He has served on committees, expert panels, and as a reviewer for the National Academies, The Joint Commission, the Hastings Center, the American Board of Medical Specialties, federal agencies, and other organizations. Dr. Wynia is the author of more than 150 published articles, chapters, and essays; co-editor of several books; and co-author of a book on fairness in health care benefit design. He is a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, and has chaired the ethics forum of the American Public Health Association and the ethics committee of the Society of General Internal Medicine. STAFF Scott Wollek, M.P.A., is a senior program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, where he serves as the director of the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. Since joining the National Academies staff in 2015, Mr. Wollek has worked on a range of projects focused on medical countermeasures, civilian biodefense, workforce resilience, health care capacity building, and other health security topics. Prior to joining the National Academies, Mr. Wollek served as the senior disaster program manager at the American Red Cross in the National Capital Region (NCR). In that role he was responsible for the management of preparedness, response, and recovery programs throughout the NCR, including the response to more than 500 local disasters each year. During his 11 years with the Red Cross, Mr. Wollek held a variety of paid and volunteer staff positions involving local disaster response, training, exercises, plans, and operations. Mr. Wollek served in leadership positions during disasters and special events including the 2009 and 2013 presidential inaugurations, 2010 blizzard, and the NCR response to Hurricane Irene, Tropical Storm Lee, the 2012 derecho, Hurricane Sandy, and the shootings at PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

E-8 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY the Washington Navy Yard. Mr. Wollek earned a bachelor’s degree in emergency health services from The George Washington University and a master’s degree in public administration, with a concentration in homeland security and emergency management, from George Mason University. Daniel L. Cork, Ph.D., is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT). He has served as a study director or a program officer for nearly all of the committee's studies or workshops related to the U.S. decennial census and the American Community Survey since joining the CNSTAT staff in 2000, including the Panels on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Research on Future Census Methods (2010 Planning panel), Review of the 2000 Census, and Review of the 2010 Census, and the Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations. He also directed the Panel on Modernizing the Nation's Crime Statistics and the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (in cooperation with the Committee on Law and Justice) and was the senior program officer for the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice and the National Materials Advisory Board). His research interests include quantitative criminology, geographical analysis, Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He has a B.S. in statistics from The George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Michelle Mancher, M.P.H., was a program officer on the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She served as a staff co-director for the Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The Ebola Experience report and as a liaison for the Sharing Clinical Trial Data Action Collaborative. Ms. Mancher joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2009 and worked on many consensus studies and workshops related to health care services delivery, clinical trial data sharing, and medical product research and development, including Initial National Priorities for Comparative Effectiveness Research; Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust; Variation in Health Care Spending: Target Decision Making Not Geography; Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Maximizing Benefits, Minimizing Risk; and Global Health Risk Framework: Research and Development of Medical Products: Workshop Summary. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Mancher held positions at the Arthritis Foundation: Metro DC Chapter, Clinton Foundation’s Alliance for a Healthier Generation, and the New York City Health and Hospital Corporation’s office of managed care. Ms. Mancher holds a master’s degree in public health in health care management and policy from Columbia University and a bachelor of arts in international relations from The George Washington University. Olivia Yost, M.Sc., is a program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She has supported multiple consensus study and workshop committees related to the topics of respiratory protection, preparedness, and occupational health—most recently, the Committee on Best Practices for Assessing Mortality and Significant Morbidity Following Large-Scale Disasters, the Committee on Current Issues in the Assessment of Respiratory Protective Devices, and the Committee on the Use of Elastomeric Respirators in Health Care. Prior to joining the National Academies in 2015, Ms. Yost worked as a research officer for ARCHIVE Global, a global health organization based in New York City, where she managed evaluation activities for disease control programs in the Caribbean, West Africa, and South Asia. Ms. Yost received her M.Sc. in PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX E E-9 the Control of Infectious Diseases from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, where her graduate research focused on developing rapid, low-cost testing methodologies to identify failing wastewater infrastructure. She received her B.A. in history and communications from Franklin University Switzerland. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters Get This Book
×
Buy Prepub | $79.00 Buy Paperback | $70.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In the wake of a large-scale disaster, from the initial devastation through the long tail of recovery, protecting the health and well-being of the affected individuals and communities is paramount. Accurate and timely information about mortality and significant morbidity related to the disaster are the cornerstone of the efforts of the disaster management enterprise to save lives and prevent further health impacts. Conversely, failure to accurately capture mortality and significant morbidity data undercuts the nation's capacity to protect its population. Information about disaster-related mortality and significant morbidity adds value at all phases of the disaster management cycle. As a disaster unfolds, the data are crucial in guiding response and recovery priorities, ensuring a common operating picture and real-time situational awareness across stakeholders, and protecting vulnerable populations and settings at heightened risk.

A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters reviews and describes the current state of the field of disaster-related mortality and significant morbidity assessment. This report examines practices and methods for data collection, recording, sharing, and use across state, local, tribal, and territorial stakeholders; evaluates best practices; and identifies areas for future resource investment.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!