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Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s (2021)

Chapter: Appendix Q: Committee and Panel Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix Q: Committee and Panel Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26141.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix Q: Committee and Panel Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26141.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix Q: Committee and Panel Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26141.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix Q: Committee and Panel Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26141.
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Q Committee and Panel Biographical Information STEERING COMMITTEE FIONA A. HARRISON, Co-Chair, is the Benjamin M. Rosen Professor of Physics and the Kent and Joyce Kresa Leadership Chair of the Division of Physics and Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. Dr. Harrison’s primary research interests are in experimental and observational high-energy astrophysics. She is the principal investigator of NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), for which she received the NASA Outstanding Public Leadership Medal in 2013. In 2015, Dr. Harrison was awarded the Bruno Rossi Prize of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society, and in 2016 she won the Harrie Massey Award from the Committee on Space Research. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. Dr. Harrison is past chair of the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society, and chair-elect of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society. Dr. Harrison served as chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Space Studies Board, is a member of the James Webb Space Telescope Independent Review Board, and chaired the National Academies’ Committee on an Assessment of the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) Mission Concepts. She was a member of the Committee on Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010. ROBERT C. KENNICUTT JR., Co-Chair, is a professor at the Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona and in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University. His research interests are primarily in observational extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Dr. Kennicutt has over 40 years of experience in various capacities, including serving as Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy and as director of the Institute of Astronomy, and as head of the School of Physical Sciences at the University of Cambridge; as editor-in-chief of the Astrophysical Journal; and as professor/astronomer and deputy head of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Arizona. Dr. Kennicutt has won numerous awards, including the Gruber Cosmology Prize and the Dannie Heinman Prize in Astrophysics at the American Institute of Physics. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Washington. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2006 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001 and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London (FRS) in 2011. Dr. Kennicutt has served on various committees at the National Academies, including the Committee on Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010, the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics. JULIANNE DALCANTON is a professor and chair of astronomy at the University of Washington. Her research interests include the origin and evolution of galaxies and their use as probes of fundamental physics. Dr. Dalcanton is also the principal investigator of a large Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury, has served as the vice chair of the Space Telescope Science Institute Council, as a member of the Collaboration Council of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), as the chair of the SDSS Galaxy Working Group, and as a member of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) nominating committee. Prior to joining her current institution, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-1

Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dr. Dalcanton is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for beginning faculty, a NASA Hubble Postdoctoral Fellowship, a Wyckoff Faculty Fellowship through the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, the Mohler Prize from University of Michigan, and the Beatrice Tinsley Prize from the American Astronomical Society. She received her Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University. Dr. Dalcanton served on the National Academies’ Astro2010 Decadal Survey Panel on the Galactic Neighborhood. TIM DE ZEEUW is a professor of astronomy at Leiden University. Dr. De Zeeuw also holds a senior visiting position at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. His research interests include the formation, structure, and dynamics of galaxies, including the Milky Way. Dr. De Zeeuw has previously served as director general of the European Southern Observatory, and as director of the Leiden Observatory and of the Netherlands Research School for Astronomy. He has led the development of the European science vision for astronomy. Prior to joining Leiden University, Dr. De Zeeuw was a senior research fellow at the California Institute of Technology, a long-term member of the Institute for Advanced Study, and a teaching and research assistant at Leiden University. He has received numerous awards, including the Royal Astronomical Society Group Award for the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae (SAURON) Team and the Brouwer Award of the Dynamical Division of the American Astronomical Society. Dr. De Zeeuw is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the European Astronomical Society, the AAS, and the International Astronomical Union. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Leiden. ANDREW S. DRIESMAN is a member of the principal professional staff in the Space Sector of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL). His background and experience are in program management, organizational management, systems engineering, integration, and architecting of complex spacecraft for both scientific and military use. Dr. Driesman is currently the program manager for NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission. Prior to starting his current role, he served in various positions including technical director of the Joint Polar Satellite System at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and supervisor for the Space Systems Applications Group at JHU APL. Previously, Dr. Driesman served as the lead engineer for developing both Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecrafts, from conceptual design through on-orbit operations. Additional experience includes system engineering for military satellite systems, board-level analog designs for space shuttle payloads, board and subsystem-level design for balloon and sounding rocket payloads, and systems-level design for missile payloads and satellites. Dr. Driesman is the recipient of numerous awards, including the NASA Individual Achievement Award in 2008 and the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal for Outstanding System Engineering Leadership Award. He received an M.S. in technical management from Johns Hopkins University. JONATHAN J. FORTNEY is the director of the Other World Laboratory at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UC Santa Cruz). He is also a professor of astronomy and astrophysics. Prior to joining UC Santa Cruz, Dr. Fortney was a Spitzer Fellow with NASA Ames Research Center and a principal investigator at the SETI Institute. He also held a postdoctoral fellowship with the National Research Council at NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Fortney’s research interests include the interiors and atmospheres of planets in and out of the solar system, atmospheres and spectra of rocky and gas giant exoplanets, super Earth and giant planet thermal evolution, planetary interiors, exoplanet characterization through transit photometry and direct imaging, and the formation of giant planets. He has received numerous fellowships and awards, including the Urey Prize in the Division of Planetary Sciences with the American Astronomical Society, the 2010 Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the NASA Early Career Fellowship in Planetary Sciences, and as a National Academy of Sciences Kavli Fellow. Dr. Fortney received his Ph.D. in planetary science from the University of Arizona. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-2

GABRIELA GONZÁLEZ is a professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University (LSU). Dr. González is also the former spokesperson of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Collaboration in the department of physics and astronomy. She is a leader of the LIGO collaboration to detect gravitational waves that successfully observed a signal on September 15, 2015, generated by the collision of a binary system of black holes. Prior to joining LSU, Dr. González was an assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University. She has received numerous honors and awards, including, most recently, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) Distinguished Scientist Award and the Dickinson College John Glover Award Medal. Dr. González received her Ph.D. in physics from Syracuse University. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on the National Academies’ Board on Higher Education and the Workforce and the Astro2010 Decadal Survey Panel on Particle Astrophysics and Gravitation. JORDAN A. GOODMAN is a Distinguished University Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland. Dr. Goodman’s research interests include particle astrophysics, which includes the study of cosmic radiation to better understand he properties in space that produce those particles, blending the elements of both high-energy physics and astrophysics. Dr. Goodman has served in various capacities at the University of Maryland, including former chair of the Physics Department. He is the principal investigator and has been the U.S. Spokesperson of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory. Dr. Goodman is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2017 Yodh Prize for Astroparticle Physics Commission of IUPAP, the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in fundamental physics, and the University of Maryland President’s Medal in 2009. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. MARC P. KAMIONKOWSKI is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Kamionkowski is a theoretical physicist who specializes in cosmology, with contributions in dark matter, dark energy, the cosmic microwave background, the early universe, physical cosmology, along with other areas of astrophysics. Dr. Kamionkowski is also the chief editor for Astrophysics and a cosmology editor for Physics Reports. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Society for General Relativity and Gravitation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Kamionkowski has received numerous awards and honors, including the Helen B. Warner Prize, the E. O. Lawrence Award for Physics, a Simons Investigator Award, and the Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. Dr. Kamionkowski previously served on the National Academies’ Astro2010 Panel on Cosmology and Fundamental Physics, the Panel on Theory and Computation in Astronomy and Astrophysics, and the Fifteenth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science. BRUCE A. MACINTOSH is a professor of physics at Stanford University. His research focuses on the detection of extrasolar planets through direct imaging, and on development of adaptive optics and astronomical instrumentation for ground and space-based telescopes. Dr. Macintosh is a co-discoverer of four planets orbiting the star HR 8799 and is the principal investigator of the Gemini Planet Imager, an advance adaptive optics planet-finder for the Gemini South Telescope. Together with the HR8799 team, he received the 2009 Newcomb Cleveland Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy at University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Macintosh has served on the National Academies’ Astro2010 Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground, the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Committee on Exoplanet Science Strategy, and the Committee on the Review of Progress Toward the Decadal Survey Vision in New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics. JACOBUS M. OSCHMANN is the 2019 president of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE). He retired from Ball Aerospace, where he had served as the vice president and general manager PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-3

of Civil Space. Mr. Oschmann is known for his significant contributions to the field of optical sciences, in optical design and technology development, along with his contributions and management on space and earth science instrumentation. He previously worked for the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), serving as project manager and chief engineer for the Gemini Observatory during its construction and early operations and then as the project manager for the conceptual design of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope. He has held various positions within SPIE, including on the board of directors, as past chair of SPIE Conference on Optical, Infrared and Millimeter Space Telescopes and SPIE Conference on Ground-Based and Airborne Telescopes. Mr. Oschmann currently serves on the NASA Advisory Subcommittee for Technology, Innovation, and Engineering and is chairing the first Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Visiting Committee. He has also served on numerous review committees for NASA, the National Science Foundation, and AURA and the European Southern Observatory, including oversight and/or reviews for the JWST, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), National Solar Observatory (DKIST, NISP), Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and Europe’s EELT project pre-design work (OWL). He established the Jacobus and Michelle Oschmann Scholarship in Optical Sciences and Business Leadership at University of Arizona. Mr. Oschmann received an M.S. in optical sciences and an M.S. in business administration from the University of Arizona. RACHEL A. OSTEN is a multi-wavelength stellar astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute and the deputy mission head for the Hubble Space Telescope. Dr. Osten’s research interests include stellar coronae, stellar flares, multi-wavelength observations of flares, stellar radio emission, and flare modeling. Prior to joining the Space Telescope Science Institute, she was a Hubble Fellow at the University of Maryland and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and a Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Dr. Osten is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the International Astronomical Union, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) North American Science Advisory Committee. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. LYMAN A. PAGE JR. is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Physics at Princeton University. Dr. Page’s primary research is on measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from ground-based, balloon-borne, and satellite platforms with high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers, and bolometers. Dr. Page’s team first established the existence of a characteristic angular scale in the data, indicating that the universe is spatially flat. He is one of the original co-investigators on the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite, whose first-year results provided precision measurements of the universe. Dr. Page was also the founding director of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope project, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Page has served on the National Academies’ Board on Physics and Astronomy and the Astro2010 Decadal Survey Panel on Radio, Millimeter, and Submillimeter from the Ground. ELIOT QUATAERT is a professor of astrophysical sciences and Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy at Princeton University. He was previously a professor of astronomy and physics and the director of the Theoretical Astrophysics Center at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Quataert is an astrophysics theorist who works on a wide range of problems, including stars and black holes, plasma astrophysics, and how galaxies form. He has received a number of national awards for his research, including the Warner Prize of the AAS, the Packard Fellowship, a Simons Investigator award from the Simons Foundation, and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Quataert received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. He has served on the National Academies’ Space Studies Board, the Astro2010 Decadal Survey Panel on Stars and Stellar Evolution, the Plasma Science Committee, and the Committee on Plasma 2010: An Assessment of and Outlook for Plasma and Fusion Science. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-4

WANDA A. SIGUR is an independent consultant for both emerging space exploration companies and traditional aerospace industry companies on strategic planning and program management. Ms. Stigur retired from Lockheed Martin as vice president and general manager of the Civil Space business, where she had executive responsibility for national space programs relating to human space flight and space science missions, including planetary, solar, astrophysical, and Earth remote sensing for civil government agencies. These major programs included the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, GOES-R weather satellites, Juno, GRAIL, MAVEN, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, InSight, OSIRIS-REx planetary missions, and the company’s nuclear space power programs. She received an M.B.A. from Tulane University. She is a member of the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) and the National Academy of Engineering. She has served on the National Academies’ Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR). RACHEL SOMERVILLE is a group leader at the Center for Computational Astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute. Dr. Somerville also holds the George A. and Margaret M. Downsbrough Chair in Astrophysics and is a Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University. Her research interests include galaxy formation and evolution, active galactic nuclei, cosmology, and large-scale structure. Dr. Somerville was previously an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, was a senior group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, and held a joint appointment at John Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute. She earned the 2013 Dannie Heinemann Prize for Astrophysics and a 2014 Simons Investigator Award. Dr. Somerville received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Santa Cruz. KEIVAN G. STASSUN is the Stevenson Endowed Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Stassun is also the founding director of the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-Intensive Astrophysics (VIDA). His research focuses on the formation of stars and planetary systems, which increasingly involves approaches at the interface of astronomy, physics, computer science, and informatics. Dr. Stassun currently serves as the general councilor of the American Physical Society and served for 8 years as chair of the American Astronomical Society’s Committee on the Status of Minorities. He is known for his leadership and distinction as a scientist and as an innovator in broadening the participation of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields. Dr. Stassun received the 2018 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. He earned a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. JEAN L. TURNER is professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Turner’s research interests include studying gaseous environments of young super star clusters in local galaxies. Prior to joining UCLA, she worked at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and was a visiting scientist at the California Institute of Technology, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the Joint ALMA Observatory. Dr. Turner is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Turner served on the National Academies’ Astro2010 Panel on Radio, Millimeter, and Submillimeter from the Ground, and the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics. PIETER VAN DOKKUM is the Sol Goldman Professor of Astronomy and divisional director of physical sciences and engineering at Yale University. His research interests include stars and stellar populations to the most distant galaxies, along with astronomical instrumentation and telescopes. Prior to joining Yale University, Dr. van Dokkum was a Spitzer Fellow and Hubble Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. He has received numerous awards, including the Marc Aaronson Memorial Prize, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the Pastoor Schmeitz Prize. Dr. van Dokkum received his Ph.D. from the University of Groningen. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-5

ELLEN G. ZWEIBEL is the W.L. Kraushaar Professor of Astronomy and Physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Zweibel is also the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor and past director of the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization. Her research interests and expertise include theoretical astrophysics with a specialty in plasma astrophysics. Prior to joining the University of Wisconsin, Madison, she was a faculty member at the University of Colorado. Dr. Zweibel received numerous awards, including being elected as a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Physical Society’s Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University. Dr. Zweibel has served on the National Academies’ Space Studies Board, the Committee on Burning Plasma Assessment, the Panel on Solar Astronomy, and the Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics. SCIENCE PANELS PANEL ON COMPACT OBJECTS AND ENERGETIC PHENOMENA DEEPTO CHAKRABARTY, Chair, is a professor of physics and associate head of the Physics Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Chakrabarty’s research interests include observational high-energy astrophysics, neutron stars, accretion disks, and ultracompact stellar binaries. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a legacy fellow of the American Astronomical Society, and is also the recipient of several awards and honors, including the Bruno Rossi Prize in High Energy Astrophysics at the American Astronomical Society, the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, and the Buechner Teaching Prize in Physics at MIT. Dr. Chakrabarty received his Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. LAURA B. CHOMIUK is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Michigan State University (MSU). After completing her Ph.D., Dr. Chomiuk was a Jansky Fellow of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. She has far-ranging interests in transient and energetic phenomena, including novae, supernovae, and X-ray binaries, and she pursues these phenomena with multiwavelength observations spanning radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. Dr. Chomiuk is a recipient of a Cottrell Scholarship and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, along with an MSU Teacher-Scholar Award. She has a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. DANIEL E. HOLZ is a professor in the Departments of Physics and Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Enrico Fermi Institute and at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. Dr. Holz held postdoctoral appointments at the Albert Einstein Institute (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics), the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, and as a Richard Feynman Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research focuses on general relativity in the context of astrophysics and cosmology, and he is a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) collaboration. Dr. Holz received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, a Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and as a member of LIGO received the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. RAFFAELLA MARGUTTI is an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Northwestern University, and will join the University of California, Berkeley, faculty in fall 2021. Previously, Dr. Margutti was a Harvard postdoctoral fellow and a James Arthur Fellow at New York University. Her research focuses on transient astrophysical phenomena, including stellar explosions, stellar disruptions by supermassive black holes, and compact-object mergers. Her most recent awards include the SLOAN PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-6

Fellowship in Physics and the CIFAR Global Scholar Fellowship. Dr. Margutti has a Ph.D. in physics and astronomy from the University of Milano Bicocca. JULIE MCENERY is a senior scientist of high-energy astrophysics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. McEnery is also the co-director of the Joint Space Science Institute of Goddard and the University of Maryland. She is the senior project scientist for the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope and previously served as the project scientist for the Fermi Mission. Dr. McEnery’s research focuses on the study of extreme high-energy transients and the development of the ground- and space-based observatories needed to pursue this. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a recipient of both the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement and the Outstanding Leadership Medals. Dr. McEnery holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University College Dublin. PETER I. MÉSZÁROS is the Eberly Chair of Astronomy and Astrophysics and a professor of physics at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Mészáros is also the director of the Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics at Penn State. His areas of research involve high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, particle astrophysics, gamma-ray bursts, and neutron stars. For the past two decades, Dr. Mészáros has been primarily interested in theoretical aspects of high-energy neutrino astrophysics and multimessenger astrophysics. Awards and memberships include the American Astronomical Society’s Rossi Prize, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and the Einstein Professor of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Mészáros obtained a Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. RAMESH NARAYAN is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at the Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian, in the Astronomy Department. Previously, Dr. Narayan was on the faculty at the University of Arizona. He is a broad-spectrum theorist with a particular interest in compact objects. Dr. Narayan’s research spans a range of topics in high-energy astrophysics, including both black holes and neutron stars; galactic and extragalactic objects; and electromagnetic bands from radio to gamma rays. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2013 and to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010; he became a fellow of the World Academy of Sciences in 2015 and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London (FRS) in 2006. Dr. Narayan received a Ph.D. in physics from Bangalore University, India. ELIOT QUATAERT, see steering committee entry above. SCOTT M. RANSOM is a tenured astronomer with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he studies pulsars and gravitational waves. Dr. Ransom is also a research professor with the Astronomy Department at the University of Virginia. He works on a wide variety of projects involving finding, timing, and exploiting pulsars of various types, using data from many different instruments and at energies from radio waves to gamma rays. His main focus is on searching for exotic pulsar systems, such as millisecond pulsars and binaries. Once these pulsars are identified, he uses them as tools to probe a variety of basic physics, including tests of general relativity, the emission (and hopefully soon the direct detection) of gravitational waves (as part of the NANOGrav collaboration, of which he is the current chair), and the physics of matter at supra-nuclear densities. Previously, Dr. Ransom was a postdoctoral fellow at McGill University before joining NRAO as a staff astronomer. He won the American Astronomical Society’s Helen B. Warner Prize “for a significant contribution to observational or theoretical astronomy during the five years preceding the award.” Dr. Ransom is a fellow of the American Physical Society and has authored or co-authored more than 250 refereed publications including more than 20 in Nature and Science. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-7

TODD A. THOMPSON is a professor of astronomy at Ohio State University. Dr. Thompson was formerly a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Lyman Spitzer Jr. Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton University. His areas of research expertise include the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, superluminous supernovae, heavy element nucleosynthesis, magnetars, and wide-field transient surveys; star formation, feedback, galactic winds, cosmic rays, and nonthermal emission from galaxies; and binary systems, compact objects, and few-body dynamics. Dr. Thompson was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, the Ohio State Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching, a Simons Foundation Fellowship, and an IBM Einstein Fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), Princeton University. He was recently a visiting junior professor while on sabbatical at the IAS. Dr. Thompson received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Arizona, Tucson. PANEL ON COSMOLOGY DANIEL EISENSTEIN, Chair, is a professor and department chair at Harvard University. Dr. Eisenstein’s research interests include cosmology and extragalactic astronomy, with a mix of theoretical and observational methods. His dominant focus over the past decade has been on the development of the baryon acoustic oscillation method to measure the cosmic distance scale and study dark energy. Prior to joining Harvard University, he was an astronomy faculty member at the University of Arizona and held postdoctoral positions at the Institute for Advanced Study and the University of Chicago. Dr. Eisenstein has been active in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) since 1998 and served as the Director of SDSS- III. He is a member and former co-spokesperson of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument collaboration, and he is a member of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near-Infrared Camera instrument team, the SDSS-IV consortium, and the Euclid consortium. Dr. Eisenstein has served as chair of the National Science Foundation Astronomy Portfolio Review committee, and he has been a member of numerous other scientific collaborations and national committees. He has received the Shaw Prize in Astronomy and was named a Simons Investigator. Dr. Eisenstein received his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. LINDSEY E. BLEEM is an assistant physicist at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Dr. Bleem’s research interests include using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological models. She is currently constructing and exploring the properties of new samples of clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect using data from the South Pole Telescope, Dark Energy Survey, and Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. Beyond this work, Dr. Bleem is engaged in efforts to better connect simulations and observations of clusters to prepare for the next-generation optical Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and cosmic microwave background surveys. She received the Maria Goeppert Fellowship and Sachs Fellowship from the University of Chicago, and the Director’s Fellowship from ANL. Dr. Bleem earned her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. MARC P. KAMIONKOWSKI, see steering committee entry above. RACHEL MANDELBAUM is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Dr. Mandelbaum was previously an associate research scholar and visiting associate research scholar for the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, and a Hubble Fellow in astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study. She has received the AAS Annie Jump Cannon Prize, the Department of Energy Early Career Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and a Simons Investigator Award, and she was the Falco- DeBenedetti Career Development Professor in Physics at CMU. Dr. Mandelbaum’s research interests are predominantly in the areas of observational cosmology and galaxy studies. This work includes the use of weak gravitational lensing and other analysis techniques, with projects that range from development of improved data analysis methods to actual application of such methods to existing data. Dr. Mandelbaum PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-8

is using data from the Hyper-SuprimeCam (HSC), and she is working on upcoming surveys including the Vera C. Rubin Observatory Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), Euclid, and the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. She is serving a two-year term as spokesperson of the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Dr. Mandelbaum earned her Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. MIGUEL F. MORALES is a professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Physics. Dr. Morales is an observational cosmologist and works primarily on measurements of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) as the Universe’s first stars and galaxies burned away the primordial neutral hydrogen fog approximately 13 billion years ago. His radio cosmology group is recognized as an international leader in developing the bespoke instruments and precision data analysis techniques required to reveal the faint cosmological radio signal. The members of this group are builders of the Murchison Widefield Array in western Australia and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array in South Africa, and have developed one of the four major EoR analysis pipelines. Dr. Morales received the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award and was included in Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery and as an emerging scholar in Diversity Magazine. Dr. Morales earned a Ph.D. in physics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. DANIEL M. SCOLNIC is an assistant professor of physics at Duke University. Dr. Scolnic was previously a KICP Fellow and a Hubble Fellow at the University of Chicago. He was selected by the Space Studies Board to participate in the National Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Sciences 7th and 8th Forum for New Leaders in Space Science. Dr. Scolnic received a Hubble Postdoctoral Research Fellowship and a Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics Fellowship, and was a national finalist for the NASA Famelab Competition. He leads dark energy and Hubble constant cosmological analyses using supernovae for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (STARRS); the Dark Energy Survey; the LSST; the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS); Foundation; Supernovae, H0, for the Equation of State (SH0ES); and WFIRST. He is also participating in the design of future missions to find the optical counterparts of gravitational waves. Dr. Scolnic earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from Johns Hopkins University. MATIAS ZALDARRIAGA is a professor of astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study. Dr. Zaldarriaga was previously a professor of astronomy and physics at Harvard University. His research interests include understanding the earliest instants in the history of the Universe and in developing the necessary tools to interpret observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and of the distribution of matter across cosmic history. Dr. Zaldarriaga developed new statistical probes to infer fundamental properties of the Universe from the CMB and radio observations of cosmic reionization. The current generation of CMB experiments is testing models of inflation and gravity using his seminal work. His work on the physics of non-Gaussianity and inflation provides a framework for studying the early Universe. Dr. Zaldarriaga has received a Hubble Fellowship, a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, the Helen B. Warner Prize from the American Astronomical Society, a Sloan Fellowship, the Gribov Medal from the European Physical Society, and a MacArthur Fellowship. He earned a Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. KATHRYN M. ZUREK is a professor of theoretical physics in the Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Zurek was previously a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a David Schramm Fellow at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study. She has a wide range of research interests, mostly focused at the boundary of particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology. Dr. Zurek’s work spans both studies of new physics signatures at colliders as well as astrophysical searches for dark matter and physics beyond the Standard Model in the neutrino sector. She has recently been active in the study of dark matter, working on theories of dark matter and ways to detect it in the laboratory by dark matter- PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-9

nucleus interactions, at colliders through high-energy collisions, and in the galaxy by dark matter self- annihilations. Recently, she has been focused on proposing new ideas to detect hidden-sector dark matter in the laboratory. Dr. Zurek earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington. PANEL ON GALAXIES DANIELA CALZETTI, Chair, is a professor and head of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Calzetti’s research interests include understanding star formation on the scales of galaxies, using information provided by a variety of both space-borne (Hubble, Spitzer, Herschel, etc.) and ground-based telescopes, at wavelengths that range from the ultraviolet to the radio. Prior to joining the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she held various positions at the Space Telescope Science Institute, including ESA Fellow, postdoctoral researcher, assistant astronomer, and associate astronomer. Dr. Calzetti is a member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union. In addition, she is a member of the ERC Panel, NASA STDT for the LUVOIR Surveyor Mission Concept Study, AURA Space Telescope Science Institute Council (STIC), and EUCLID Science Consortium/Co-I of Euclid Science Program: Precision Studies of Galaxy Growth and Cosmology. Dr. Calzetti has received numerous awards, including the Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Research at the University of Massachusetts, the Clarivate-Reuters World’s Most Cited Researchers, the Blaauw Professorship of the University of Groningen, and the Tage Erlander Guest Professorship at the University of Stockholm. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Rome. MICHAEL BOYLAN-KOLCHIN is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Boylan-Kolchin’s research focuses on theoretical astrophysics, including numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of cosmological structure, galaxies, and globular clusters; galaxy dynamics; the nature of dark matter; the epoch of reionization; and near-field cosmology. For this panel, he brings expertise with all associated wavelengths. Prior to joining the University of Texas, Dr. Boylan-Kolchin was a faculty member at the University of Maryland and a postdoctoral scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and the Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Dr. Boylan-Kolchin received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. HSIAO-WEN CHEN is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of Chicago. Dr. Chen’s research interests include the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time, chemical enrichment in the intergalactic medium (IGM), and transient phenomena. Prior to joining the University of Chicago, she held a postdoctoral position at Carnegie Observatories and a Hubble Fellowship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Chen has served as the vice president of the International Astronomical Union IGM Commission, chair of the Adler Planetarium Visiting Committee, and chair of the Space Telescope Users’ Committee. Her work is related to absorption-line spectroscopy of distant light sources (quasars/gamma-ray burst afterglows) to probe diffuse gas around galaxies, and in combining absorption-line observations with galaxy survey data to understand the recycling of baryonic matter between star-forming regions and dark intergalactic medium. For this panel, Dr. Chen brings expertise with ultraviolet wavelengths and spectroscopy. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. ANN E. HORNSCHEMEIER is the chief of the X-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Hornschemeier specializes in studies of X-ray emission from accreting black hole and neutron star binary populations, both in the local universe and at cosmologically interesting distances. She chaired the NuSTAR Starburst and Local Group science working group, carrying out observations of nearby galaxies and coordinating observations with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-10

Dr. Hornschemeier is also involved in future missions, serving as the only U.S. science co-investigator on the Wide-Field Imager on Athena and as a member of the international consortium for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission. For this panel, she brings expertise with X-ray wavelengths. Dr. Hornschemeier won the American Astronomical Society’s Annie Jump Cannon Award and NASA awarded her an Early Career Achievement Medal. She has been recognized by the American Physical Society as a fellow, and was awarded the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Helen Sawyer Hogg lectureship for her studies of X-ray emission from galaxies. Dr. Hornschemeier received her Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Pennsylvania State University. SUSAN A. KASSIN is an AURA Associate Astronomer with tenure at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Dr. Kassin is also an associate research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Department of Physics and Astronomy. Previous positions include postdoctoral researcher at the University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Kassin studies galaxy formation and evolution at low and high redshift. She uses observations at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, in addition to numerical simulations. For this panel, Dr. Kassin brings expertise with optical and near-infrared wavelengths. She received a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Ohio State University. AMANDA A. KEPLEY is an assistant scientist with the North American ALMA Science Center at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Dr. Kepley previously held postdoctoral positions at NRAO and at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on investigating the role that gas, dust, and magnetic fields within galaxies play in their evolution, primarily using radio telescopes like Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Dr. Kepley also develops and tests heuristics for automated data reduction pipelines, both for ALMA and for her own research. For this panel, she brings expertise with infrared and radio wavelengths. Dr. Kepley was the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. CHARLES C. STEIDEL is the Lee A. DuBridge Professor of Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Steidel’s previous positions include assistant professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Hubble Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a world leader in observational cosmology. Dr. Steidel defined the state and chemical composition of the intergalactic medium in the early Universe, and he discovered normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. With co-workers, he measured the clustering of these galaxies, thus placing serious constraints on cosmological models. Dr. Steidel’s expertise is related to the processes of galaxy formation and the nature of the intergalactic medium. He has received the Gruber Cosmology Prize from the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation in recognition of his revolutionary studies of the most distant galaxies in the universe. Dr. Steidel received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology. DANIEL K. STERN is the NuSTAR project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Stern’s research interests emphasize understanding the cosmic history of black hole formation and activity, observational cosmology, and identifying and studying galaxies and galaxy clusters at high redshift. For this panel, he brings expertise with X-ray, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths. Some of Dr. Stern’s recent awards are the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the NASA Group Achievement Award to the NuSTAR Science Team, and the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal. He received his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. TOMMASO TREU is a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), in the Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Previous positions include Distinguished Visitor at the Space Telescope Science Institute and professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Dr. Treu’s research interests and expertise include galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, he is interested in early-type PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-11

galaxies; galaxies in clusters; high redshift galaxies; the co-evolution of spheroids and black holes; gravitational lensing and dark matter in galaxies; and clusters of galaxies, cosmography from gravitational time delays, and galaxies in the epoch of reionization. For this panel, Dr. Treu brings expertise with optical and infrared wavelengths. He is a recipient of the American Astronomical Society Newton Lacy Pierce Prize, the UCSB H.J. Plous Memorial Award, and the David and Lucille Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. Dr. Treu received his Ph.D. in physics from Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy. PIETER VAN DOKKUM, see steering committee entry above. DAVID H. WEINBERG is a Distinguished University Professor and chair of the Department of Astronomy at Ohio State University. Dr. Weinberg studies the large-scale structure of the universe, dark energy and dark matter, the formation and evolution of galaxies and quasars, and the intergalactic medium (IGM). He is well-known for his development of “halo occupation” methods to connect observed galaxy clustering to underlying dark matter structure, for theoretical modeling and cosmological applications of the Lyman-alpha forest, and for numerical simulation studies of the mechanisms of galaxy growth. For this panel, Dr. Weinberg brings expertise with all associated wavelengths. He has received the University Distinguished Scholar award and the Lancelot M. Berkeley New York Community Trust Prize for Meritorious Work in Astronomy by the American Astronomical Society. Dr. Weinberg received his Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University. PANEL ON EXOPLANETS, ASTROBIOLOGY, AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM VICTORIA S. MEADOWS, Chair, is a professor of astronomy at the University of Washington in the Department of Astronomy, where she is also director of the Astrobiology Program and principal investigator for the NASA Virtual Planetary Laboratory. Dr. Meadows’s research interests include theoretical modeling of terrestrial planetary environments to understand their habitability, the generation and detectability of exoplanetary biosignatures and their false positives, and solar system planetary observations. The overarching goal of her research is to determine how to recognize whether a distant extrasolar planet can or does support life. Previously, Dr. Meadows was a research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and an associate research scientist at the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology. She is a recipient of several NASA Group Achievement Awards, has been on the SETI Institute Science Advisory Board, and was a Frontiers of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Meadows earned her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Sydney. DAVID A. BRAIN is an associate chair for undergraduate studies at the University of Colorado (CU). Dr. Brain is also an associate professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences in the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. At CU, he is a co-deputy principal investigator of NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft mission at Mars, and project scientist and advisor for the United Arab Emirates Hope spacecraft mission to Mars. Dr. Brain’s research interests include atmospheric escape and long-term evolution of planetary atmospheres, planetary magnetospheres and plasma interactions, and the influence of planetary magnetic fields on climate evolution and habitability. Previously, he was a research physicist at the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Brain is a recipient of the NASA Early Career Fellowship in planetary sciences. He earned his Ph.D. in astrophysical and planetary sciences from the University of Colorado. IAN J.M. CROSSFIELD is an assistant professor of astrophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the Department of Physics. At MIT, Dr. Crossfield has led the discovery and characterization of new exoplanets discovered by NASA’s TESS and Kepler/K2 missions. In this effort, he leads a number of large observational programs with the Hubble Space Telescope (transmission PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-12

spectroscopy), Spitzer Space Telescope (transit and secondary eclipse photometry), 10 m Keck Observatory (precise radial velocities), and 8.2 m Gemini Observatory (diffraction-limited adaptive optics and speckle imaging). His research interests focus on the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres to test models of planet formation and of atmospheric chemistry, thermal structure, and general circulation. Previously, Dr. Crossfield was a NASA Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the Department of Astronomy and at the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Lab, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. He also was a systems engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory for 3 years, after which he earned his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Los Angeles. COURTNEY D. DRESSING is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Department of Astronomy. Dr. Dressing is an observational astronomer focused on detecting and characterizing planetary systems. She conducts both statistical investigations of the ensemble of known planetary systems and in-depth studies of individual systems. Dr. Dressing’s research group uses telescopes on the ground and in space to search for planets, determine their orbital parameters, measure their masses, and constrain their bulk compositions. She is curious about planet formation and evolution, the frequency of planetary systems in the Galaxy, and the prospects for detecting life on planets outside our Solar System. Previously, Dr. Dressing was a NASA Sagan Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. She was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship in 2019 for becoming “a world leader in the search for other worlds.” In 2019, Dr. Dressing was also awarded a Hellman Fellowship and a Packard Fellowship from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. She earned a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from Harvard University. JONATHAN J. FORTNEY, see steering committee entry above. TIFFANY KATARIA is a scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the Astrophysics and Space Sciences Division. Dr. Kataria’s research focuses on the theoretical modeling of dynamics and chemistry in the atmospheres of transiting and directly imaged exoplanets, and particularly how theoretical models can be used to interpret observations of exoplanet atmospheres using ground- and space-based telescopes. She is currently a member of the executive committee of the Exoplanetary Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG) and a member of the JWST Users Committee (JSTUC). Prior to joining the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Dr. Kataria was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Exeter. She received her Ph.D. in planetary sciences from the University of Arizona. KATHLEEN E. MANDT is the chief scientist for exoplanets at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). At APL, Dr. Mandt serves as the chief scientist for exoplanets, where she is responsible for initiating an exoplanet program that leverages the planetary science, heliophysics, mission leadership, and instrument development expertise at APL to contribute to future detection and characterization of exoplanets. She serves in several community and NASA mission leadership roles, including membership on the Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) steering committee, and served on the Division for Planetary Science Professional Culture and Climate Subcommittee. Dr. Mandt was the Volatiles Theme Lead for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission and is the project scientist for the LRO Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument, the project scientist for the Phase A Io Volcano Observer (IVO) Discovery Mission concept study, the deputy project scientist for the Heliophysics Division-funded Interstellar Probe predecadal mission study, and a science team member on the Europa Clipper Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding teams. Dr. Mandt was a science team member on the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer and Rosetta Ion Electron Spectrometer teams. Her research covers a broad range of topics, including the dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Dr. Mandt is particularly interested in leveraging the expertise of the planetary science community to advance characterization of exoplanet atmospheres and applying studies in solar system atmospheric evolution to better understand the evolution of exoplanet systems. Previously, Mandt was an PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-13

adjunct professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Texas, San Antonio, and a senior research scientist at Southwest Research Institute. She earned her Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from the University of Texas, San Antonio. MARK S. MARLEY is a research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. At NASA Ames, Dr. Marley primarily studies the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs through theoretical modeling and comparisons to data. His research interests include the chemistry and physics of clouds and hazes, departures from chemical equilibrium, the origin and evolution of extrasolar giant planets, the characterization of extrasolar planets through direct imaging, giant planet seismology, and synergies between Solar System and extrasolar planetary science. Previously, Dr. Marley was on the faculty of New Mexico State University in the Department of Astronomy. He is a fellow of the American Astronomical Society and an associate fellow of Ames Research Center, and has twice been awarded the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. Dr. Marley earned his Ph.D. in planetary science from the University of Arizona. BRITNEY E. SCHMIDT is an associate professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Schmidt is the principal investigator of the Ross Ice Shelf and Europa Underwater Probe (RISE-UP), an interdisciplinary astrobiology and oceanographic investigation leveraging remote sensing and autonomous underwater vehicles to examine Earth’s ice shelves as analogs for extraterrestrial icy moons and their potential for habitability. Her research interest in the astrobiology of icy systems focuses on Europa, where she models the formation of surface terrain to better understand ice-ocean interactions and works on a variety of instrument technology and platforms for subsurface exploration. Dr. Schmidt is also a co-investigator on NASA’s Europa Clipper radar team, a member of the Europa Lander and LUVOIR science definitions teams, and an associate of the Dawn mission. She was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas, Austin, where she was named outstanding early career researcher, and she is recipient of a NASA Early Career Fellowship and the Eric R. Immel Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Georgia Tech College of Science. Dr. Schmidt earned her Ph.D. in geophysics and space physics from the University of California, Los Angeles. CHRISTOPHER C. STARK is an associate scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). Dr. Stark has led the exoplanet science yield simulations for many of the direct-imaging mission concepts currently under study and is a leading expert in exozodiacal dust and debris disks. His research interests include debris disks/exozodis (as a source of both signal and problematic noise), disk composition, planet-dust dynamics and gravitationally induced disk structures, high-contrast direct-imaging methods and instrument design (including coronagraphy, external occultation, and interferometric nulling), the optimization of observations to maximize the scientific return of direct-imaging missions, and systems design for future exoplanet-imaging missions. Prior to working at STScI, Dr. Stark was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carnegie Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. PANEL ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND STAR AND PLANET FORMATION LEE W. HARTMANN, Chair, is the Leo Goldberg Collegiate Professor of Astronomy at the University of Michigan. Dr. Hartmann has worked as an astrophysicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and was a vice president of the American Astronomical Society. His research interests include the formation of stars and star clusters, molecular cloud structure and dynamics, protostellar accretion, evolution of protoplanetary disks and planet formation, and mass function of stars. Dr. Hartmann is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Wisconsin System. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-14

SEAN M. ANDREWS is an astrophysicist with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and a lecturer on astronomy at Harvard University at the Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian. Prior to that, Dr. Andrews was a Hubble Fellow at SAO. He does research on planet formation in the disks of gas and dust that orbit around young stars, primarily using radio interferometer data. In 2010 and 2017, Dr. Andrews was awarded the Secretary’s Research Prize by the Smithsonian Institution. He was the principal investigator of the Disk Substructures at High Angular Resolution Project (DSHARP), an Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) Large Program. Dr. Andrews received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Hawaii. PHILIP J. ARMITAGE is a professor at Stony Brook University in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Dr. Armitage is also a group leader at the Center for Computational Astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute. Prior to his current position, he did postdoctoral work at the University of Toronto’s Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics and at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Munich, Germany. Dr. Armitage is interested in understanding the physical processes involved in the formation of planetary systems, including the role of two-fluid instabilities in forming the first analogs of asteroids and comets, and the importance of radiation hydrodynamic effects in the accretion of planetary envelopes. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy. BRUCE T. DRAINE is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University. After serving for 2 years in the Peace Corps, teaching physics and math in Ghana, Dr. Draine went to Cornell University. He has computed models for interstellar dust-grain properties, proposed a solution to the problem of the polarization of starlight by dust, showed that emissions from spinning grains is an important foreground to the cosmic background radiation, and discovered a new kind of interstellar shock wave. His work has created important models to interpret some of the processes that occur in interstellar space. Dr. Draine was a member of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS), a Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy project that studied a sample of 75 nearby galaxies, and a member of the KINGFISH collaboration, a Herschel Key Project using the Herschel Space Telescope (a 3.5 m telescope in space with a cryogenic focal plane) to study 61 nearby (d < 30 Mpc) galaxies using both far-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. Dr. Draine received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Cornell University. KAITLIN M. KRATTER is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona. Prior appointments include a Hubble Fellowship at the University of Colorado and an Institute for Theory and Computation Fellowship at Harvard University. Dr. Kratter employs analytic and computational techniques to tackle topics including accretion disk dynamics, binary formation, few-body dynamics, and planet-disk interactions. She received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Toronto. KARIN M. SANDSTROM is an assistant professor of astrophysics at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Sandstrom specializes in multiwavelength studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) in nearby galaxies. Her interests include interstellar dust, ISM phases, heating and cooling of gas and dust, feedback from stellar populations, and chemical enrichment. Dr. Sandstrom has been awarded observing time as principal investigator on numerous telescopes, including the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. SNEZANA STANIMIROVIC is a professor of astronomy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Stanimirovic moved to Madison after working as a research associate in the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. Before Berkeley, she spent 3 years in Puerto Rico, working at the Arecibo Observatory. Dr. Stanimirovic’s research interests include mapping neutral hydrogen in and around the Milky Way; statistical investigation of the interstellar medium; and star formation, magnetic fields, and diffuse matter in the galaxy. She was awarded the NSF Career Award in 2010 and became a PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-15

fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Stanimirovic earned her Ph.D. at the University of Western Sydney, jointly supervised by the Australia Telescope National Facilities. ELLEN G. ZWEIBEL, see steering committee entry above. PANEL ON STARS, THE SUN, AND STELLAR POPULATIONS SARBANI BASU, Chair, is a professor and chair of the Department of Astronomy at Yale University. Dr. Basu’s research interests include the study of the Sun and other stars using data on stellar oscillations, and in studying the variations in the Sun over time scales that are of societal relevance. She is a co- investigator of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, and a member of the steering committee of the TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium. Dr. Basu serves as the deputy chair of the board of directors of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), and she is a member of the advisory board of the journal Solar Physics. She is the recipient of numerous awards: she is a 2020 fellow of the American Astronomical Society, received the 2018 George Ellery Hale Prize of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, is a 2015 fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and received the 1996 M.K. Vainu Bappu Gold Medal of the Astronomical Society of India. Dr. Basu received her Ph.D. in physics from Tata Institute of Fundamental Research. NANCY S. BRICKHOUSE is the senior science advisor at the Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian. Dr. Brickhouse has served as the associate director for the Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Sciences Division at the Center for Astrophysics. Her research interests include solar and stellar coronal physics, plasma spectral modeling, atomic data for astrophysics, ultraviolet to X-ray spectroscopy of diverse objects, and physical processes in astrophysical plasmas. Dr. Brickhouse is a leader of the Atomic Data for Astrophysicists (ATOMDB) Project, which uses collisional and radiative atomic data to generate spectral models needed for high-energy astrophysics. She received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. ADAM BURGASSER is a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of California, San Diego, and an observational astrophysicist whose research interests include the lowest mass stars, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar planets. Dr. Burgasser’s work focuses on substellar atmospheres, multiple systems, activity, and populations using optical/infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, radio interferometry, and large data science. He also conducts research in physics education and art-science collaboratories. Dr. Burgasser has previously held a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles; a Spitzer Postdoctoral Fellowship at the American Museum of Natural History; and a faculty position in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been awarded the University of California, San Diego’s Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action and Diversity Award, Outstanding Mentor Award, and Distinguished Teaching Award, and was a faculty Fulbright Scholar at the University of Exeter. Dr. Burgasser is a member of the International Astronomical Union, National Society of Black Physicists, and SACNAS, and is a vice president of the American Astronomical Society. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. JULIANNE DALCANTON, see steering committee entry above. JENNIFER A. JOHNSON is a professor of astronomy at Ohio State University (OSU). Dr. Johnson’s research interests include stellar abundances, origin of the elements, nucleocosmochronology, and the formation of the Galaxy and the local group. She is the program head of the Milky Way Mapper of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Previously, Dr. Johnson was a postdoctoral fellow at the Carnegie Institution PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-16

for Science and at the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California, Santa Cruz. R.T. JAMES MCATEER is an associate professor at New Mexico State University (NMSU). Dr. McAteer also serves as director of the Sunspot Solar Observatory. His research interests are in space weather monitoring and solar cycle studies, understanding the physics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections, and the heating of the solar atmosphere. Dr. McAteer is the principal investigator of the Solar Physics and Space Weather research group at NMSU, where he leads a convergence program of computer science, electrical engineering, and astrophysics to facilitate interdisciplinary research and space weather predictions. He chairs the National Solar Observatory Users Committee and is a current member of the Daniel K. Inouye Data Policy Advisory Committee. Prior to joining NMSU, Dr. McAteer was an EU Marie Curie Research Fellow at Trinity College Dublin, a STEREO senior scientist and research associate at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellow at Queen’s University Belfast. He is a recipient of the NSF Faculty CAREER Award. Dr. McAteer received his Ph.D. in physics from the Queen’s University Belfast. ELISA V. QUINTANA is an astrophysicist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Quintana serves as the TESS deputy project scientist, the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope deputy project scientist for communications, and the principal investigator of the Pandora SmallSat mission to study exoplanet atmospheres. She is also a member of the TESS Guest Investigator Office and a member of the Goddard Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee. Dr. Quintana’s research is focused on the detection, characterization, and formation of exoplanets using ground- and space-based observations, data analysis techniques, and modeling. She leads the Goddard Exoplanet Group, which works on research related to exoplanets, low-mass star activity, and developing small space-based mission concepts. Previously, Dr. Quintana worked at NASA Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute for 10 years on the Kepler and K2 space missions. She led a team of astronomers to confirm Kepler-186f, the first Earth- size planet found to orbit within the habitable zone of another star. Dr. Quintana is the recipient of the Great Minds in STEM 2015 Scientist of the Year, the Lupe Ontiveros Dream Award, and the NASA Software of the Year Award. She is a member of the American Astronomical Society. Dr. Quintana received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. LOUIS-GREGORY STROLGER is the AURA observatory scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Dr. Strolger is also an associate research scientist in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. His interests include supernovae, supernova cosmology, and dark energy. Dr. Strolger is primarily interested in the nature of supernovae progenitors through bulk analyses of rates and environmental effects (e.g., star-formation, metallicity) and the evolution of these properties over cosmic history. Prior to this, he was an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Western Kentucky University. Dr. Strolger received his Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. PROGRAM PANELS PANEL ON AN ENABLING FOUNDATION FOR RESEARCH DAVID N. SPERGEL, Chair, is the founding director for computational astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute and the Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy emeritus of the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. He is currently co-chair of the WFIRST-AFTA science team and the editor of the Princeton Series in Astrophysics. Dr. Spergel has made major contributions to cosmology, astroparticle physics, galactic structure, and instrumentation. He led the theoretical analysis for the PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-17

Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, invented novel coronagraphs for planet detection, originated and explored the concept of self-interacting dark matter, and showed that the Milky Way is a barred galaxy. He was the W.M. Keck Distinguished Visiting professor of Astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research fellow. Dr. Spergel has received numerous awards, including the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the Helen B. Warner Prize, the Bart Bok Prize, the AAS Second Century Lecturer, a MacArthur Fellowship, the Shaw Prize in Astrophysics, the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, and shared the Gruber Prize as a member of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, an honorary member of the National Society of Black Physicists, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Spergel served on the NSF’s Advisory Committee for Astronomical Sciences; the Theory, Experimental and Laboratory Astrophysics Subcommittee; and the Scientific Advisory Board for the Hayden Planetarium. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. MICHAEL BLANTON is a professor of physics at New York University. Dr. Blanton specializes in computation and modeling of large-scale structures in the universe and is currently director of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV and was Data Coordinator of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. He received his Ph.D. in astrophysics from Princeton University. KELLE L. CRUZ is an associate professor of astrophysics and astronomy at Hunter College, City University of New York. Dr. Cruz’s research interests are observational study of low mass stars and brown dwarfs, optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, cool atmospheres, and stellar content of the Solar Neighborhood. Much of her research concentrates on creating large public data sets of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and using that data to undertake statistically robust studies of their physical properties. Dr. Cruz is also the founder and editor for AstroBetter, a blog and wiki site for professional astronomers. She was a National Science Foundation Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and then a Spitzer Fellow at Caltech. She received her Ph.D. in physics and astronomy from the University of Pennsylvania. MARK J. DEVLIN is the Reese W. Flower Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Devlin specializes in experimental cosmology at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, collecting data from which he makes statistical inferences about the evolutionary history of the universe. He designs and builds instrumentation and telescopes that he uses to observe from high- altitude balloons and the high plateaus of Chile. Dr. Devlin received the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences Ira H. Abrams Memorial Award for Distinguished Teaching and was an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. MEGAN E. DONAHUE is professor of astronomy at Michigan State University. She studies galaxy clusters, including models and observational tests of cooling flows in the gas within clusters. Dr. Donahue is a fellow of the American Physical Society and is currently the president of the American Astronomical Society. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Colorado. KEITH A. HAWKINS is an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Hawkin’s research interests are galactic and stellar archaeology, chemical composition of stars, stellar spectroscopy, exoplanet host star characterization, and galactic structure. He began as an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Texas, where he was named a Scialog Fellow and a Kavli Fellow. He is a member of the American Astronomical Society and serves on their Committee for the Status of Minorities in Astronomy (CSMA), and he was chair, King’s College Graduate Society. Dr. Hawkins was a British Marshall Scholar and has received a Simons Foundation Junior Research Fellowship at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Cambridge. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-18

ALINA A. KIESSLING is a research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Kiessling has a background in dark matter and dark energy research through weak lensing analysis of N-body simulations. She is currently working on the upcoming Euclid Space Telescope, the Vera C. Rubin Observatory, and the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. Formerly, she co-led an investigation on stratospheric airships, with the goal of determining whether these may become low-cost platforms for astrophysics (and Earth science) missions in the future. Dr. Kiessling received her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh. KARIN ÖBERG is a professor of astronomy and director of Undergraduate Studies at the Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian. Dr. Öberg is also leader of the Öberg Astrochemistry Group at the Center and specializes in astrochemistry and its impact on planet formation, including the compositions of nascent planets. She is a recipient of the Hubble Postdoctoral Fellowship, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in Physics, and the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. She received her Ph.D. from Leiden University. ANGELA V. OLINTO is the dean of the Division of the Physical Sciences at the University of Chicago. Dr. Olinto is also the Albert A. Michelson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. She previously served as chair of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Dr. Olinto is best known for her contributions to the study of the structure of neutron stars, primordial inflationary theory, cosmic magnetic fields, the nature of the dark matter, and the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays, and neutrinos. She is the principal investigator of the Probe of Extreme Multi- Messenger Astrophysics (POEMMA) space mission, the principal investigator of the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) on a super pressure balloon mission, and was a member of the Pierre Auger Observatory. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received the Chaire d’Excellence Award of the French Agence Nationale de Recherche, the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching at the University of Chicago. Dr. Olinto received her Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her B.S. in physics at the Pontificia Universidade Catolica of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BERNARD J. RAUSCHER is an experimental astrophysicist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He serves as a detector scientist within the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project and as a member of the JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) Science Team. Dr. Rauscher has experience in detector development, including near-infrared detector arrays, photon counting CCDs, and most recently superconducting single photon detectors. His work has led to the development of Improved Reference Sampling and Subtraction for JWST NIRSpec and new algorithms for testing space flight hardware. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. RACHEL SOMERVILLE, see steering committee entry above. JAMES M. STONE is a professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in the School of Natural Sciences. Previously, Dr. Stone was the Lyman Spitzer, Jr. Professor of Astrophysical Sciences and a professor of applied and computational mathematics at Princeton University as well as the chair of the university’s Department of Astrophysical Sciences. His research interests include star formation, accretion flows, interstellar gas dynamics, and the development of numerical algorithms for magnetohydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics. The public codes ZEUS-2D, released in 1992 by Stone and Michael Norman, and Athena, released in 2008 by Stone and his collaborators, are among the most powerful and widely used codes for astrophysical fluid dynamics. Dr. Stone was named a fellow of the American Physical PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-19

Society and received the organization’s Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics and the Dirk Brouwer Career Award from the American Astronomical Society. During his academic career, Dr. Stone has held academic positions at the Princeton University, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Maryland. He is also member of the American Astronomical Association, the American Physical Society, and the International Astronomical Union, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. Stone received his Ph.D. for astronomy from the University of Illinois. He has previously served on several Academies’ committee. PANEL ON ELECTROMAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS FROM SPACE 1 MARCIA J. RIEKE, Chair, is a Regents Professor of Astronomy and an astronomer at the University of Arizona in the Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory. Her research interests include infrared observations of galactic nuclei and high-redshift galaxies. Dr. Rieke has served as the deputy principal investigator on the near-infrared camera and multi-object spectrometer for HST (NICMOS), and she is currently the principal investigator for the near-infrared camera (NIRCam) for the James Webb Space Telescope. She has worked on the Spitzer Space Telescope as a co-investigator for the multiband imaging photometer and as an outreach coordinator and as a member of the Science Working Group. Rieke was also involved with several infrared ground observatories, including the Multiple Mirror Telescope in Arizona. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Rieke received her Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. RUSLAN BELIKOV is an astrophysicist at NASA Ames Research Center. He is also director of the Exoplanet Technologies research group at NASA Ames, which has demonstrated several state-of-the-art milestones in high-contrast imaging. In addition, Dr. Belikov and his team have been pioneering and advancing technologies to suppress starlight in multi-star systems such as Alpha Centauri to enable direct imaging of exoplanets there. Dr. Belikov has served on NASA’s Exoplanet Program Analysis Group executive committee, where he chaired a Science Analysis Group to survey exoplanet statistics. He has more than a decade of experience in developing technologies and mission concepts to directly image exoplanets, especially potentially habitable ones. Dr. Belikov has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. REBECCA A. BERNSTEIN is a staff scientist at the Carnegie Science Institute. Dr. Bernstein’s research has focused on measurements of the diffuse extragalactic backgrounds at optical wavelengths. That work led to an interest in the technical aspects of low surface brightness measurements, stellar spectroscopy, and instrument design. As a Hubble Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories, Dr. Bernstein designed and led the development of the echelle spectrograph for the Magellan telescopes (MIKE, commissioned 2001) while developing a method for measuring the detailed chemical abundances of unresolved, extragalactic globular clusters. While on the faculty at the University of Michigan (UM), she also designed the optics for the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph for the Magellan telescopes and the prime focus Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam) used for the DES survey at the CTIO’s 4m Blanco telescope in Chile. After earning tenure at UM, Bernstein moved UC Santa Cruz, where she was the principal investigator and optical designer for the wide-field optical spectrograph for Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), one of its planned first-light instruments. Bernstein served as staff astronomer at the Carnegie Observatories and became the project scientist for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the California Institute of Technology. LESTER M. COHEN is the retired chief engineer of the Structural Analysis and Design Group at the Center for Astrophysics: Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA). Mr. Cohen’s areas of expertise include structures, structural mechanics, and mounting and fabrication of optics. He served as lead mechanical PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-20

engineer, NASA JWST Optical Telescope Element. Mr. Cohen has earned 12 NASA group and individual awards, including two NASA Public Service Medals and one Distinguished Public Service Medal for his work on two of NASA’s Great Observatories: Chandra and JWST. He has an M.S. in civil engineering from Northeastern University. NIKOLE K. LEWIS is an assistant professor at Cornell University. Dr. Lewis is also deputy director of the Carl Sagan Institute. She probes exoplanet atmospheres using a combination of observational and theoretical techniques. Dr. Lewis is involved with a number of ground- and space-based observational campaigns aimed at characterizing exoplanet atmospheres. Dr. Lewis was a Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the James Webb Space Telescope Project Scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute before arriving at Cornell. She received her B.S. in physics and mechanical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, her M.A. in astronomy from Boston University, and her Ph.D. in planetary sciences from the University of Arizona. BRUCE A. MACINTOSH, see steering committee entry above. AMY MAINZER is a professor at the University of Arizona in the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Dr. Mainzer previously served as a senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the astrophysics division. At JPL, she served as the principal investigator for the NEOWISE mission, which is a NASA spacecraft dedicated to observing near-Earth asteroids and comets using a thermal infrared space telescope. As the NEOWISE principal investigator, Dr. Mainzer’s research focuses on characterizing the population of asteroids and comets through statistical measurements of their sizes, orbits, albedos, and rotational states. The mission began life as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and its original purpose was to carry out an all-sky survey at four infrared wavelengths from 3– 22 microns. Dr. Mainzer served as the deputy project scientist for the WISE mission; her responsibilities included flowing down top-level science requirements to the WISE payload components, interpreting payload verification test data, and designing the in-orbit checkout procedures. She has received the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement medal for her work on near-Earth objects and the NASA Exceptional Achievement medal for her work on NEOWISE. Prior to joining JPL, Dr. Mainzer worked as a systems engineer at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto. Dr. Mainzer is also the principal investigator of a NASA Discovery mission proposal, the Near-Earth Object Camera. She is a member of the NASA Planetary Science Subcommittee. MARK P. SAUNDERS is an independent consultant. Since retiring from NASA in December 2008, Mr. Saunders has been consulting to various NASA offices providing program/project management and systems engineering expertise. This has included support to the Office of Chief Engineer, the Office of Independent Program and Cost Evaluation, the Mars Program and the Science Office for Mission Assessments (at Langley Research Center). Mr. Saunders has participated in the rewriting of NASA’s policy on program/project management; advised and supported the Agency’s independent program/project review process; and has supported the review of various programs and projects. At NASA headquarters, he served as director of the independent program assessment office, where he was responsible for enabling the independent review of the Agency’s programs and projects at life cycle milestones to ensure the highest probability of mission success. At the Office of Space Science, he served as program manager for the Discovery Program. Mr. Saunders received the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award in 2008; Outstanding Performance awards in 1982 and1994–2008; and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals in 1998, 2004, 2006. He earned his B.A. in industrial engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. EVGENYA L. SHKOLNIK is an associate professor of astrophysics at Arizona State University in the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Dr. Shkolnik is an expert on exoplanets and stars, including the Sun, and studies stellar activity and star-planet interactions using ground and space telescopes to answer PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-21

questions involving stellar evolution, exoplanet magnetic fields, and planet habitability. She is the principal investigator (PI) of the NASA Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) mission, and PI of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)’s Habitable Zones and M Dwarf Activity Across Time (HAZMAT) program. Asteroid Shkolnik (25156) was named for her. Dr. Shkolnik is also a member of the NASA Astrobiology Institute Virtual Planetary Laboratory, and is on several science and technology advisory committees for upcoming space missions. Shkolnik previously was an astronomer at Lowell Observatory, a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institution for Science, and a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of British Columbia. GEORGE SONNEBORN was an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, with 37 years of experience in design, development, and operation of space telescopes. Before retiring from the agency in 2018, Dr. Sonneborn was the project scientist for operations for the James Webb Space Telescope. Prior to that, he was the Hubble Space Telescope acting senior project scientist and the project scientist for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. His research interests are supernovae, massive stars, and the atomic abundances in the interstellar medium. Dr. Sonneborn is a member of the AAS and IAU. He received a Ph.D. in astronomy from Ohio State University. C. MEGAN URRY is the Israel Munson Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Yale University. Dr. Urry is also director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics. She previously served as chair of the Physics Department at Yale and in the presidential line of the American Astronomical Society. Prior to moving to Yale, Urry was a senior astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which runs the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA. Her scientific research focuses on active galaxies, which host accreting supermassive black holes in their centers. Dr. Urry is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and American Women in Science and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She received an honorary doctorate from Tufts University and was awarded the American Astronomical Society’s Annie Jump Cannon and George van Biesbroeck prizes. Dr. Urry received her Ph.D. in physics from the Johns Hopkins University and her B.S. in physics and mathematics from Tufts University. PANEL ON ELECTROMAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS FROM SPACE 2 STEVEN M. KAHN, Chair, is Cassius Lamb Kirk Professor in the Natural Sciences and professor of particle physics and astrophysics at Stanford University. Dr. Kahn is also the director of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project at AURA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Dr. Kahn’s research interests include the LSST that will enable a wide array of scientific investigations ranging from studies of moving objects in the solar system to the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. Prior to joining Stanford University, he held numerous positions at Columbia University, including I.I. Rabi Professor of Physics, professor of physics, and assistant professor of physics. In addition, Dr. Kahn was a Center Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He is currently a member of both the editorial board for the Cambridge Observing Handbooks for Research Astronomers and the editorial board for the Cambridge Contemporary Astrophysics Series at Cambridge University Press. In addition, Dr.Kahn is a member of the external advisory committee in the particle physics division of the department of physics at the University of Oxford, co-chair of the external advisory committee of the Giant Magellan Telescope, and an outside member of the Astro E Science Working Group run by NASA and ISAS. He is affiliated with the AAS High Energy Astrophysics Division, the APS Astrophysics Division, the AAAS, the American Association of University Professors, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Kahn is the recipient of many awards including fellowships to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Physical Society. In addition, he PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-22

received the Andrew R. Mikelson Prize in Physics. Dr. Kahn received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. LISA BARSOTTI is a principal research scientist with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, and part of the Laster Interferometer Gravitational- Wave Observatory (LIGO) Laboratory. Dr. Barsotti’s research interests include strong gravity and gravitational radiation, gravitational wave detection, and quantum measurements. In particular, she led the upgrade to the Advanced LIGO detectors to use squeezed vacuum states. She is a fellow of the APS, and she has been awarded the 2019 New Horizons in Physics Prize. Dr. Barsotti earned her Ph.D. in applied physics from Pisa University, Italy. ALLISON BARTO is a senior program manager at Ball Aerospace. Ms. Barto began her career supporting development of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instruments for the Hubble Space Telescope and most recently spent 17 years supporting the design, build, and test of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) as both an optical systems engineer and program manager for the Ball Aerospace effort. This included the optical design, delivery of all opto- mechanical mirror components and electronics for JWST, cryogenic instrument radiators, and the wavefront sensing and control algorithms used to phase the telescope on orbit. In addition to program roles, Ms. Barto led the systems engineering team for the NASA In-Space Assembled Telescope study and serves on the Management Advisory Committee for the European Southern Observatory’s Extremely Large Telescope. She is actively involved with the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) where she currently serves as chair of the Symposia Committee and sits on the Strategic Planning Committee. She is recipient of the 2014 Women in Aerospace Achievement Award for her technical contributions to the JWST optical verification program and the 2017 Aviation Week Program Excellence Award for her work on JWST’s cryogenic electronics system. She earned her B.S. in physics from Harvey Mudd College. MICHAEL BAY is president and chief engineer of Bay Engineering Innovations. Mr. Bay has more than 41 years of experience in systems design and space flight systems engineering on over 20 NASA space missions. He has extensive experience in leading system and detailed design; development, manufacturing; testing; verification; mission planning; launch site and mission operations; and anomaly investigation and resolution activities, both for pre-flight testing and in-orbit activities. Bay is a member of the Avionics Technical Discipline Team of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and a participant in the NESC’s Systems Engineering Technical Discipline Team. Mr. Bay also led the systems engineering portion of the NESC’s Technical Support to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) on the Reported Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) Unintended Acceleration (UA) Investigation. Mr. Bay received a NASA Public Service Medal for Leadership in Systems Engineering, and NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal. He was the first recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) Judith A. Resnik Field Award for “engineering solutions to urgent spacecraft testing problems and for developments in on-orbit servicing.” Mr. Bay received his B.S. in computer science from Loyola University, Maryland. MARTIN ELVIS is a senior astrophysicist at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. Previously, Dr. Elvis was the science data system group leader at the Chandra X-Ray Center. His research interests include near-Earth asteroid detection and properties, and observations and theory of active galactic nuclei. He is a highly cited astrophysicist (over 30,000 peer citations) who has published some 400 refereed papers. He is a fellow of the AAAS, a member of the Aspen Center for Physics, and is past- chair of the Hubble Space Telescope Users’ Committee, and of the High Energy Division of the AAS. Asteroid 9283 Martinelvis is named after him. Dr. Elvis earned his Ph.D. in X-ray astronomy from Leicester University. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-23

CHARLES J. HAILEY is the Pupin Professor of Physics and co-director of the Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory at Columbia University. Dr. Hailey’s research interests are observational high energy astrophysics and experimental particle astrophysics. He chairs the Galactic Plane Survey Working Group on the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, and coordinates the NuSTAR legacy observations of the Galactic Center and of TeV gamma-ray sources in conjunction with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) and the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC). He is the principal investigator of the General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) experiment, a balloon-based search for dark matter. He is a member of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Physical Society (APS). Dr. Hailey earned his Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. CHRYSSA KOUVELIOTOU is a professor of astrophysics and chair of the Department of Physics at George Washington University (GWU). Prior to GWU, Dr. Kouveliotou was a senior technologist for High-Energy Astrophysics at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. Her research interests focus on high- energy astrophysical transients, in particular gamma ray bursts and magnetars (which she discovered in 1998); she has also published papers in X-ray binaries, solar flares and merging galaxy clusters. Dr. Kouveliotou has been a co-investigator of BATSE/CGRO, Fermi/GBM; she is currently an affiliated scientist of Swift and participates in two working groups of ESA’s ATHENA mission. She is the recipient of the Descartes Prize, the Rossi and Heinemann Prizes, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. She holds two honorary degrees from Sussex University and the University of Amsterdam; she is an APS and AAAS fellow, and an AAS legacy fellow. Dr. Kouveliotou is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences, and a corresponding member of the Athens Academy, Greece. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and served on its executive council. In 2015, the Greek Government awarded her the Commander of the Order of the Honor medal, for excellence in science. In 2021, Dr. Kouveliotou shared the Shaw Prize for Astrophysics with Victoria Kaspi. She has chaired the NASA/Astrophysics Division Roadmap of the next three decades. She served in the ExCom of the NAS/Space Studies Board, in the AAS/HEAD as chair, AAS/vice president, and APS/DAP chair. She currently chairs the IAU/USNC and serves in the AURA Board.  CHARLES R. LAWRENCE is the chief scientist for astronomy and physics at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Lawrence is the project scientist for the U.S. Planck mission and deputy project scientist for the Spitzer Space Observatory. His research interests include measurement and analysis of the cosmic microwave background to understand the geometry and content of the Universe, extragalactic radio sources, and gravitational lensing. He is the recipient of two Exceptional Achievement Medals, two Outstanding Leadership Medals, and a Distinguished Public Service Medal, all from NASA, and was part of the Planck team awarded the Gruber Prize in Cosmology. He has been a member of the AAS since 1983. Dr. Lawrence earned his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. S. HARVEY MOSELEY JR. is vice president for engineering at Quantum Circuits, Inc. Dr. Moseley has long experience with complex systems operating at cryogenic temperatures. He was a key member of the Cosmic Background Explorer science and development team, whose leaders Mather and Smoot won the 2006 Nobel Physics prize for its groundbreaking measurements of the early universe. He invented and led the advance of cryogenic X-ray microcalorimeters, which are central to the scientific capability of current and future X-ray astrophysics missions. He led the creation of microshutter arrays that provide multi- object spectroscopy on JWST. Dr. Moseley has received the Joseph Weber prize of the AAS, the George Goddard Prize of the International Society of Optics and Photonics (SPIE), and was conferred the rank of Distinguished Senior Professional by President Obama. He earned his Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Chicago. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-24

RESHMI MUKHERJEE is the Helen Goodhart Altschul Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Barnard College. Dr. Mukherjee’s research interests are in high-energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics. She uses ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to study galactic and extragalactic high-energy gamma-ray sources. One of her current projects is VERITAS, a ground-based gamma-ray observatory. Mukherjee's research also involves the development of next-generation telescope instrumentation for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). She earned her Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. LYMAN A. PAGE JR., see steering committee entry above. GORDON J. STACEY is a professor of astronomy and director of undergraduate studies at Cornell University. Dr. Stacey’s research interests center on studies of star formation and its interplay with the interstellar medium across cosmic time. These studies have focused on far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength fine-structure and rotational line emission from abundant atoms, ions, and molecules. Current projects include fine-structure line studies of galaxies both locally and at high redshift, with the Field- Imaging Far-Infrared Line Spectrometer for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the Herschel and Spitzer archives, ALMA, and his ZEUS-2 spectrometer on APEX. Dr. Stacey also is collaborating with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the construction of the HIRMES spectrometer for SOFIA, which focuses on protoplanetary disk studies and is constructing an imaging spectrometer for use on Cornell’s CCAT-prime telescope. His group is also designing and fabricating new Fabry-Perot mirror technologies. He is an AAS and IAU member and has served on numerous national and international review panels. Dr. Stacey earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from Cornell University. PANEL ON OPTICAL AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS FROM THE GROUND TIMOTHY M. HECKMAN, Chair, is the inaugural Dr. A. Hermann Pfund Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Heckman is also the director of the Center for Astrophysical Sciences, where he is responsible for promoting and supporting research in astrophysics, nurturing large-scale projects and providing them with an organizational structure, providing a forum and a focus for strategic planning, fostering cooperation between the different elements of the local astrophysics and space science communities, and providing a structured career path for the non-tenure-track research staff. Dr. Heckman’s research interests include galaxy evolution, starbursts, black holes, and active galactic nuclei. He is a member of the GALEX Science Team, a builder of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), chair of the Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium Board, vice chair of the Board of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, and former chair of the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) Board of Governors, during which time ARC established the SDSS. Dr. Heckman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Washington. DAVID A. BEARDEN is a senior strategist in the Innovation Foundry Office of Formulation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Dr. Bearden leads teams to develop advanced concepts across JPL’s mission directorates. He serves on standing review and other review boards for NASA. Dr. Bearden has considerable expertise concerning the issues and potential solutions in balancing benefit, cost, and risk across a broad array of space systems application areas including science missions, human spaceflight, remote sensing, telecommunications, missile defense, launch, and operations. Prior to joining JPL, Dr. Bearden was general manager of the NASA and Civil Space Division at The Aerospace Corporation, where he was responsible for management and technical leadership of the company’s support to NASA headquarters and centers as well as civil space agencies. He has served on the board of trustees for the International Space University (ISU). Dr. Bearden was awarded a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-25

DAVID CHARBONNEAU is a professor at Harvard University in the Department of Astronomy. Dr. Charbonneau was previously the R.A. Millikan Postdoctoral Scholar in Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. His research focuses on the detection and characterization of planets orbiting other stars. He measured the first exoplanet transits, and developed the primary methods which astronomers now regularly use to investigate exoplanet atmospheres. He leads the MEarth project, with his team announced the discovery of several of the closest rocky exoplanets, which are amenable to characterization. His focus on low-mass stars as exoplanet targets has led to several discoveries concerning the physical processes by which theses stars maintain magnetic fields, and how they lose angular momentum as they age. He is a co-investigator in the NASA TESS Mission. Dr. Charbonneau is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy at Harvard University. SUVI GEZARI is an associate professor at University of Maryland. Dr. Gezari has previously been an associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University and a Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focus is on time domain astrophysics. She has used the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Survey, the Palomar Observatory surveys iPTF and ZTF at optical wavelengths and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Time Domain Survey at ultraviolet wavelengths, together with follow-up space-based and ground-based observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum, to discover and characterize transients and study their physical properties. Dr. Gezari has appeared on public television, the history channel, and Canadian public radio discussing her research. She received the NSF CAREER award in 2015 for her research on “Probing the Demographics of Supermassive Black Holes with Time-Domain Observations of Tidal Disruption Events.” Dr. Gezari received her Ph.D. in astronomy from Columbia University. ANDREA M. GHEZ is professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), in the Division of Physics and Astronomy. Dr. Ghez has previously held the positions of associate and assistant professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA and was the Hubble postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Arizona. Her expertise is related to the development and application of high spatial resolution infrared imaging techniques applied to the questions of the origin and early life of stars and planets, and the distribution and nature of matter at the center of our galaxy. Her work also strives to understand how a black hole gains mass from its surroundings and what can be learned by analogy about the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central black holes. Dr. Ghez is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has received the Bakerian Medal and the Crafoord Prize. She received her Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. JENNY E. GREENE is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University. Dr. Greene has previously been an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Texas, Austin, and a Carnegie- Princeton postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University. Her expertise is related to black hole mass measurements, black hole/galaxy connections, stellar and gaseous kinematics of galactic nuclei, stellar populations in galaxies, and the low surface brightness universe. Dr. Greene has received the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and the Bok Prize from the Harvard University Astronomy Department as well as the Annie Jump Cannon Award from AAS. She received her Ph.D. for astronomy from Harvard University. J. TODD HOEKSEMA is a senior research scientist at Stanford University in the W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory. Dr. Hoeksema has previously been a research associate at Stanford’s Center for Space Science and Astrophysics and Heliophysics Discipline Scientist at NASA HQ. His primary scientific interests include physics of the Sun and heliosphere; solar and coronal magnetic fields; space weather; helioseismology; and education and public outreach. Dr. Hoeksema’s experience includes research administration; system and scientific programming; and the design and operation of instruments to measure solar magnetic and velocity fields from ground and space. He is a Calvin College PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-26

distinguished alumni and NASA distinguished public service medal recipient. He received his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. JACOBUS M. OSCHMANN, see steering committee entry above. RICHARD W. POGGE is professor and vice chair for Instrumentation at the Ohio State University. Dr. Pogge is a co-discoverer of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 subclass of AGN and did early work on the ionization morphology of active galactic nuclei. In recent years, he led the building and commissioning of OSU’s twin multi-object optical spectrographs for the Large Binocular Telescope (MODS1 & MODS2), and has worked on every major instrument project at OSU since 1989. Dr. Pogge’s current research is focused on understanding and revising the absolute metallicity calibration of HII regions in nearby and distant galaxies, a topic of crucial importance for understanding the chemical evolution and growth of galaxies over cosmic time, and he continues work on active galactic nuclei and exoplanets. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of California, Santa Cruz. MASSIMO ROBBERTO is an AURA Observatory Scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Dr. Robberto is also a research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. He has previously been an astronomer at the European Space Agency and a staff astronomer at the Max Planck Institut für Astronomie in Heidelberg. At STscI, he is the lead of the JWST/NIRCam team. Before working on the JWST/NIRCam, Dr. Robberto was instrument scientist for the infrared channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. He is principal investigator of SCORPIO, the Gen4#3 facility instrument at Gemini South, and principal investigator of SAMOS, an AO-fed MOS for SOAR. His main expertise is in the concept, development, and operations of novel astronomical instrumentation. He has asteroid 2008 QE12 Robberto named after him. Dr. Robberto received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Turin, Italy. NATASCHA M. FÖRSTER SCHREIBER is a senior staff scientist at the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) in Garching, Germany. Dr. Schreiber has previously held positions as research associate at MPE, and postdoctoral researcher at Leiden Observatory, the Netherlands, and at CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/Service d’Astrophysique in Saclay, France. Her expertise is in the field of galaxy formation and evolution, and her current work focuses on galaxy kinematics, structure, stellar populations, and gas content from spatially resolved and integrated properties using observations in the optical to infrared and millimeter regimes. Dr. Schreiber held a Minerva Fellowship of the Max-Planck- Society in 2008–2013, and was awarded the Degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa (Hon. D.Sc.) from the University of Bath, United Kingdom in 2019. She received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Munich, and MPE, Germany. DAVID R. SILVA is Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and dean of the College of Sciences at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). Dr. Silva is a former director of the National Science Foundation’s National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO, 2008–2019). His scientific research interests are in the general area of stars and stellar systems, especially as tracers for how galaxies formed and evolved over the last 13 billion years. He has extensive experience with the design, development, and operation of astronomical observatories, telescopes, focal-plane instruments, and data systems for the European, North American, and South American research communities. PANEL ON PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS AND GRAVITATION JOHN F. BEACOM, Co-Chair, is the Henry L. Cox Professor of Physics and Astronomy as well as an Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor at the Ohio State University. Dr. Beacom is also the director of the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics. His research interests focus on the intersections of PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-27

the fields of astrophysics, particle physics, and nuclear physics, especially neutrinos. Prior to joining the Ohio State University, Dr. Beacom was a David N. Schramm Fellow of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group at Fermilab, and a Sherman Fairchild Postdoctoral Scholar at Caltech. He is the recipient of numerous recognitions, including being a Fermilab Distinguished Scholar, a Divisional Associate Editor of Physical Review Letters, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and the winner of two major teaching awards at the Ohio State University. Dr. Beacom received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin. LAURA CADONATI, Co-Chair, is professor of physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Formerly, Dr. Cadanoti was an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Areas of research include gravitational waves and particle astrophysics, with a focus on the detection, characterization, and astrophysical interpretation of short-duration gravitational wave signals that are produced by cataclysmic astrophysical events such as the collisions of black holes and neutron stars, or core collapse supernovae. She is a member and past deputy spokesperson of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, and a past member of the Borexino Solar Neutrino Collaboration. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), has chaired the APS Division of Gravity, and is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the Georgia Institute of Technology outstanding faculty research author award. Dr. Cadonati holds a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. DAVID Z. BESSON is a professor of physics at the University of Kansas. Key areas of research have included particle astrophysics using radio detection methods and astrophysical applications of silicon photomultipliers. In particular, Dr. Besson is currently involved in several projects to detect very-high- energy cosmic rays (primarily protons or neutrinos) from either their radio-wave emissions or radar reflections. He is also involved in studies of anomalous charmed baryon correlations with the Belle and Belle-II experiments. Dr. Besson received a Ph.D. in physics from Rutgers University. GABRIELA A. GONZÁLEZ, see steering committee entry above. JORDAN A. GOODMAN, see steering committee entry above. ELIZABETH A. HAYS is a research astrophysicist and the chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Hays serves as the project scientist for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Her research focuses on high-energy studies of astrophysical sites of particle acceleration and development of instrumentation for space-based gamma-ray observatories. She has received the Robert H. Goddard Exceptional Scientific Achievement award and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Dr. Hays received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland, College Park. N. JEREMY KASDIN is the assistant dean for engineering programs at the University of San Francisco. He is also the Eugene Higgins Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, emeritus, at Princeton University. Previously, Dr. Kasdin was a member of the Princeton faculty for 20 years and held the post of vice dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Prior to that, he was the chief systems engineer for NASA’s Gravity Probe B spacecraft. While at Princeton, he studied techniques for high-contrast imaging from ground and space using coronagraphs and starshades. Dr. Kasdin was the principal investigator for the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) instrument on the Subaru Telescope on Maunakea, Hawai’i. He is the adjutant scientist for the coronagraph instrument on NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope. He earned his Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-28

DAVID B. KIEDA is a professor at the University of Utah (UU) in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He also serves as the dean of the UU Graduate School. Dr. Kieda is the head of the UU experimental gamma-ray astronomy research group. He has led the development of new technologies for observational high-energy astrophysics, including work on the Fly’s Eye/High-Resolution Fly’s Eye, the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS), HAWC, and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatories. Dr. Kieda also works on the development of techniques for visible band imaging of nearby hot stars with an angular resolution better than 100 micro-arc seconds. He received the Utah Governor’s Medal of Science and Technology and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania. ANDREA N. LOMMEN is a professor and the chair of the Physics and Astronomy Department at Haverford College. Previously, she held the same positions at Franklin and Marshall College. Dr. Lommen has founded efforts in gravitational wave detection using pulsars through both the North American Nanohertz Observatory of Gravitational Waves and the International Pulsar Timing Array. She is currently leading efforts to demonstrate pulsar timing capabilities in the x-ray regime as part of NASA’s Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer. Dr. Lommen has received a National Science Foundation CAREER award. She received a Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. BRIAN D. METZGER is a professor at Columbia University in the Department of Physics. His research covers a wide range of topics in theoretical high-energy astrophysics, mostly related to compact objects, nucleosynthesis (astrophysical origin of the elements), and the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources. Dr. Metzger has received a New Horizons Breakthrough Prize in Physics and a Bruno Rossi Prize of the American Astronomical Society. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. JAMES H. YECK is a researcher with the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Mr. Yeck serves as the interim project director for the Cosmic Microwave Background-Stage 4 (CMB-S4) project. Previously, he was the director general of the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund, Sweden, and the project director of the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory. Mr. Yeck has more than 30 years of project director and project manager experience leading projects in both federal and contractor roles. He currently chairs and serves as a member of numerous advisory committees for projects and facilities sponsored by the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation, including LIGO and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. He holds an M.S. in mechanical and nuclear engineering from Northwestern University. NICOLAS YUNES is a professor of physics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Previously, Dr. Yunes was an associate professor of physics and one of the founding directors of the eXtreme Gravity Institute at Montana State University. Key areas of research have included gravitational wave theory, modeling and data analysis with ground- and space-based detectors, black hole and neutron star theory, and tests of general relativity with gravitational waves, binary pulsars, and solar system observations. He has received the Young Scientist Prize of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation, the NASA Einstein Fellowship, and the Juergen Ehlers Thesis Prize from the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation. Dr. Yunes is an editor of Classical and Quantum Gravity. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Pennsylvania State University. PANEL ON RADIO, MILLIMETER, AND SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS FROM THE GROUND PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-29

ANDREW J. BAKER, Chair, is a professor of physics and astronomy at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Baker’s research interests focus on the use of radio, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelength observations of interstellar matter to probe galaxy evolution in the nearby and distant universe. Prior to joining Rutgers, he worked at the University of Maryland as a National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Jansky Fellow and at the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik as a postdoctoral researcher with the infrared/submillimeter astronomy group. Dr. Baker is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a former Fulbright scholar, a former Defense Science Study Group member, and a recipient of the Warren I. Susman Award for Excellence in Teaching. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology. HÉCTOR G. ARCE is a professor of astronomy at Yale University. Dr. Arce’s research interests include star formation; feedback from young stellar objects, molecular clouds, and cores; and the physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium. To conduct his research, he mostly uses radio, millimeter, and sub-millimeter telescopes. Prior to joining Yale University, Dr. Arce was an NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics postdoctoral fellow at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and a postdoctoral researcher in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory millimeter array group at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. He has served in several radio/millimeter/sub-millimeter proposal review committees and in the Arecibo Observatory users and scientific advisory committee. Dr. Arce is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER award. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. RAVINDER S. BHATIA is associate project manager for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Dr. Bhatia has worked on international collaborations in technology development for more than 25 years, in astronomy, Earth observation, and oceanography. Previously, he was project systems engineer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile. As senior thermal/cryogenics engineer at the European Space Agency, Dr. Bhatia supported the development of the Planck Space Telescope and the MIRI camera for the James Webb Space Telescope, as well as serving as technical officer for technology research and development contracts with industry, government research facilities, and academia. He was visiting research fellow at the UK National Oceanography Centre. As senior postdoctoral scholar at Caltech’s Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, his research focused on developing instruments to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background. He worked in industry as an Aeronautical Engineer for Lucas Aerospace. Dr. Bhatia is a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Ravinder Bhatia received his Ph.D. in experimental astrophysics and aerospace Engineering from Queen Mary College. TRACY E. CLARKE is a research astronomer at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the Remote Sensing Division. Dr. Clarke’s primary research interests involve understanding the large-scale diffuse emission in clusters of galaxies, and their relation to the mergers of clusters of galaxies and to the injection of energy by the huge relativistic jets produced episodically by the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. She uses both X-ray and radio astronomy in her research. She also has made important contributions in the development of radio astronomy hardware. As the current VLA Low-Band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) Project Scientist and the System Scientist for the Long Wavelength Array from 2011–2017, she has a prominent role in advancing the state of the art in synthesis imaging and instrumentation at low radio frequencies. Dr. Clarke is a former Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. She is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the International Union of Radio Science, and the International Astronomical Union, and served on the SKA Organization’s Science and Engineering Advisory Committee for the Square Kilometre Array from 2017 to 2021. Dr. Clarke holds a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Toronto. MATT A. DOBBS is a professor at McGill University (Canada) in the Department of Physics. He is also an associate member of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Dobbs is a senior PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-30

fellow in the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Gravity and the Extreme Universe program, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada College of New Scholars. His research group at McGill specializes in the development of novel instrumentation and experiments to explore the universe with millimeter wavelength observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and radio observations of 21 cm hydrogen emission and fast radio transients. Dr. Dobbs is the recipient of the 2019 Killam Research Fellowship in Natural Sciences for his project, titled “Unveiling the Cosmos with a New Paradigm Digital Radio Telescope,” involving the recently developed Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, (CHIME). He was awarded the inaugural Owen Chamberlain Fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (U.S.) and earned a Sloan Fellowship. Dr. Dobbs was named Canada Research Chair (T2) in Astro-particle Physics for two terms from 2006 to 2015. He was awarded the inaugural Dunlap Award for Innovation in Astronomical Research Tools and the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal. He earned his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from the University of Victoria (Canada). DAVID L. KAPLAN is an associate professor of physics at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Dr. Kaplan’s primary research interests as a multi-wavelength astronomer include compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), as well as multi-wavelength and multi-messenger transients. Prior to joining the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, he was a Hubble Fellow at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Pappalardo Fellow and Hubble Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Kaplan is co-PI of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) Survey Project, and is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), and the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) collaborations. He serves on the editorial board of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. He received his Ph.D. in astrophysics from California Institute of Technology. DANIEL P. MARRONE is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona. He is also an associate astronomer at Steward Observatory. Dr. Marrone was previously a Hubble Fellow and a Jansky Fellow at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. His research addresses a number of topics, including the physics of black holes, the formation of early galaxies, and cosmology. His work often relies on the construction of new instruments, primarily at centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths. He is chair of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration science council and a member of the South Pole Telescope collaboration. Dr. Marrone served on the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Advisory Committee from 2018 to 2020 and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Users Committee from 2014 to 2020. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and, as a member of the EHT collaboration, the NSF Diamond Achievement Award and the Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Dr. Marrone earned a Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. LYNN D. MATTHEWS is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory. Dr. Matthews specializes in radio wavelength studies of evolved stars and on the deployment of new technologies for observational radio astronomy. She is part of the Event Horizon Telescope team that used the technique of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) to achieve the first ever image of a supermassive black hole. She served as commissioning scientist for the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) Phasing Project that brought millimeter VLBI capabilities to ALMA, and is currently principal investigator of the ALMA Phasing Project Phase 2. Previously, she held appointments as a Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and as a Clay Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Dr. Matthews is a member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union. She received a Ph.D. in astronomy from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-31

JOAN R. NAJITA is an astronomer and chief scientist at NSF’s NOIRLab, where she has been a scientific staff member for the past 22 years. As chief scientist, Dr. Najita is responsible for science planning, science communications, and the health of the scientific environment at NOIRLab. Her research interests include star and planet formation; low mass stars and brown dwarfs; the Milky Way; infrared spectroscopy; massively multiplexed wide-field spectroscopy; and science sociology and resource allocation practices in astronomy. She is also interested in the future of science publications, communicating science to the public, and the role of science in society. A recipient of the Annie Jump Cannon Award in Astronomy, Dr. Najita is a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Aspen Center for Physics and the American Astronomical Society. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. RICHARD L. PLAMBECK is a research astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Plambeck’s research focuses on the development of instrumentation for millimeter wavelength astronomy, and on high-resolution observations of star-forming regions. He helped construct the receivers used on the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array (BIMA) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA). The success of those telescopes led ultimately to the construction of ALMA, the world's premier telescope at mm wavelengths. Dr. Plambeck served on numerous ALMA design reviews and on the ALMA Science Advisory Committee. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. JEAN L. TURNER, see steering committee entry above. PANEL ON STATE OF THE PROFESSION AND SOCIETAL IMPACTS MARGARET M. HANSON, Co-Chair, is divisional dean and a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Hanson’s research interests include studying massive stars and stellar clusters, along with imaging simulations of stellar clusters that better constrain the properties of resolved clusters. Dr. Hanson was the associate editor-in-chief of the Astronomical Journal for 8 years. Prior to joining her current organization, she was a Hubble Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Arizona. She is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Leading Women of Cincinnati Science and Technology Award, the Edith C. Alexander Award for Distinguished Teaching, the National Science Foundation CAREER award, and the Sigma Xi Young Investigator Award. Dr. Hanson is a member of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the American Astronomical Society. She received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Colorado. ENRICO RAMIREZ-RUIZ, Co-Chair, is a professor and the Vera Rubin Chair of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz is also the director of the Lamat Institute, where he works vigorously to support the promotion and retention of women and historically marginalized students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz’s research interests include high-energy astrophysics and gravitational wave astronomy. Prior to joining the University of California, Santa Cruz, he was a John Bahcall Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University. Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Kavli Fellowship from the National Academy of Science, the Radcliffe Fellowship from Harvard University, the Niels Bohr Professorship from the Danish National Research Foundation, the Edward A. Bouchet Award from the American Physical Society, the HEAD Mid-Career Prize from the American Astronomical Society, and a fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Ramirez-Ruiz received his Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Cambridge. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-32

GURTINA BESLA is an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona. Dr. Besla is also an assistant astronomer at Steward Observatory. Her research interests focus on understanding the formation and evolution of low-mass dwarf galaxies, particularly the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, through numerical simulations. Dr. Besla is the principal investigator of the University of Arizona’s TIMESTEP program, which is focused on increasing the presence of underrepresented minority students in the physical sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. PATRICIA T. BOYD is an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Boyd serves as the chief of the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory and as project scientist for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Her research interests focus on the long-term variability in stellar binaries, star-planet interaction, and accretion onto stellar-mass and supermassive compact objects. Dr. Boyd has led the Guest Investigator Programs for several operating NASA missions, including the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and TESS. She spent 2 years at NASA headquarters, where she served as the program scientist for the Kepler mission through launch, commissioning, and early operations, while also serving as the GALEX program scientist and managing the Origins of Solar Systems grants portfolio for the Astrophysics Division. Dr. Boyd is a member of the NASA Astrophysics Advisory Committee (formerly the NASA Astrophysics Subcommittee). She was the Goddard lead for the National Astronomy Consortium, an internship program focused on recruiting and retaining STEM professionals from underserved populations, and co- organized the Women in Astronomy Roundtable at Goddard College. Dr. Boyd is also co-creator of the AstroCappella project, a musical exploration of the universe used in classrooms and in live performances. She has been recognized by NASA for her work several times, including exceptional achievement for diversity and EEO and exceptional outreach achievement for the Hubble 25th anniversary. Dr. Boyd earned her Ph.D. in physics and atmospheric science from Drexel University. KATHRYNE J. DANIEL is assistant professor of physics at Bryn Mawr College. Dr. Daniel’s research interests are in galaxy evolution and dynamics. She is a member of the Society for Advancing Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, serves on the AAS Committee on the Status of Minorities in Astronomy, and is a committee member for the Division for Dynamical Astronomy. Dr. Daniel also co-organized a workshop at the AAS on combating racism in astronomy. She received the American Dissertation Fellowship from the American Association of University Women for both her academic work and her role in promoting women in astrophysics. Dr. Daniel earned her Ph.D. in physics and astronomy from Johns Hopkins University. MARTHA P. HAYNES is the Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences in Astronomy at Cornell University. Dr. Haynes’s research interests focus on observational cosmology, galaxy evolution, and techniques of radio astronomy. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Haynes has received the Henry Draper Medal for investigations in astronomical physics for her work in mapping the distribution of galaxies in the universe. She has been recognized at Cornell for her commitment to undergraduate education and mentoring. Dr. Haynes earned her Ph.D. in astronomy at Indiana University. She has previously served on the Board of Physics and Astronomy, the Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences, and the Report Review Committee at the National Academies, and was co-vice chair of the 2010 decadal survey. JEDIDAH C. ISLER is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth University and a consultant and speaker. Dr. Isler’s research interests focus on studying blazars using multi-wavelength observations of their particle jets. She is a well-known speaker and advocate for women of color in science. Dr. Isler founded Vanguard: Conversations with Women of Color in STEM, a panel discussing the experiences of women of color in STEM. She also founded and leads the STEM en Route to Change Foundation with the goal to use STEM as a tool for social justice. Dr. Isler received the American PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-33

Astronomical Society Roger Doxsey Dissertation Prize and became a TED Fellow. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics from Yale University. RACHEL L. IVIE is the senior director of education and research at the American Institute of Physics (AIP). In this capacity, Dr. Ivie is responsible for the Center for the History of Physics, the Niels Bohr Library and Archives, the Society of Physics Students, and the Statistical Research Center. Prior to her appointment as senior director, Dr. Ivie served AIP in the Statistical Research Center for 21 years, both as assistant and associate director, before leading it entirely as director. Her research interests include physics and astronomy faculty in 4-year institutions, women and underrepresented groups in physics and astronomy, and employment and career paths in physics and astronomy. Dr. Ivie has carried out a number of studies related to the career outlook of women in physics, including on tenure and promotion practices for male and female faculty. She also completed an NSF-funded longitudinal study on gender differences in career outcomes for astronomy graduate students. Dr. Ivie earned her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. KATHRYN V. JOHNSTON is a professor of astronomy at Columbia University. Past appointments include postdoctoral membership in the Institute for Advanced Study, junior faculty at Wesleyan University, and 3 years as the chair of the Columbia Astronomy Department. Dr. Johnston’s research interests focus on the dynamics, formation, interactions, and evolution of the galaxy, stellar populations, and the Milky Way and Local Group. Beyond her own research, she is committed to enabling science through community projects and networks. At Columbia, Dr. Johnston helped move the institution to a shared model for research computing and is currently the chair of the Committee for Equity and Diversity in the School of Arts and Sciences. She has also led discussions on women in science at more than 20 departments nationwide in the past decade. Dr. Johnston is just starting a joint appointment as Dynamics Group Leader at the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Astrophysics. She earned her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California, Santa Cruz. CASEY W. MILLER is the associate dean for Research and Faculty Affairs for the College of Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Miller is also a professor in the School of Chemistry and Material Science. His research interests include experimental, nanoscale magnetic materials, and he is a nationally recognized expert in STEM graduate education. Dr. Miller serves as director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) INCLUDES Alliance: IGEN’s Inclusive Practices Hub. He has served as the director of the American Physical Society (APS) Bridge Program’s site at the University of South Florida, which strives to increase the number of physics Ph.D.s awarded to underrepresented minority students. Dr. Miller has also served on the APS Committee on Minorities, and he was the chair of the 2017 APS Graduate Education and Bridge Program Conference. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas, Austin. JESÚS PANDO is an associate professor of physics and astrophysics at DePaul University and currently serves as the chair of the department. Dr. Pando’s research interests focus on uncovering structure in a noisy environment, such as large-scale structure formation in the universe. He is a member of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science and a board member of the National Society of Hispanic Physicists, both with the goal of dealing with issues faced by underrepresented students and professionals in STEM. Dr. Pando earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Arizona. JULIE R. POSSELT is an associate professor of higher education at the University of Southern California at the Rossier School of Education. Dr. Posselt’s research examines institutionalized inequalities in higher education and methods to reduce inequities and encourage diversity. She has written three books focusing on equity and inclusion in higher education, as well as numerous articles and papers on the subject. Dr. Posselt completed the National Academy of Education’s first national study of graduate student mental PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-34

health, and directs the National Science Foundation-funded California Consortium for Inclusive Doctoral Education and the Inclusive Graduate Education Research Hub. She is associate editor of the Journal of Higher Education. Dr. Posselt earned her Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Michigan. JANE R. RIGBY is an astrophysicist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Rigby served for 9 years as a project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and is currently the operations project scientist. She was a NASA headquarters-appointed member of the Science and Technology Definition Team for the NASA Large UV/Optical/IR Surveyor (LUVOIR) mission concept. Dr. Rigby’s research interests focus on observations of star-forming galaxies, supermassive black holes, and gravitational lensing as a tool to study galaxies. She has received numerous awards, including the John C. Lindsay Memorial Award for Space Science, the Robert H. Goddard Award for Exceptional Achievement for Science, and the Robert H. Goddard Award for Diversity and Equal Employment Opportunity. Dr. Rigby co-organized the “Inclusive Astronomy 2015” conference, served as a founding member of the AAS’s Working Group on LGBTIQ Equality, and served on the AAS Committee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy. She has given public talks to large audiences including TEDx, the Library of Congress, and two conferences for undergraduate women in physics, and has lectured on the impact of gay activist and astronomer Frank Kameny. Dr. Rigby earned her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Arizona. WILLIE S. ROCKWARD is chair and professor of physics at Morgan State University. Dr. Rockward’s research interests include micro/nano optics lithography, extreme ultraviolet interferometry, metamaterials, and the spectroscopy of binary stars. He is the currently the president of the National Society of Black Physicists. As chair of his department, Dr. Rockward investigated the barriers faced by the physics departments of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and launched the “We C.A.R.E.” approach meant to improve the overall number of African American physicists. He gave the keynote speech at the Conference for Underrepresented Minority Physicists in 2017. Dr. Rockward received his Ph.D. in physics from Georgia Institute of Technology. KEIVAN G. STASSUN, see steering committee entry above. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION Q-35

Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s Get This Book
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We live in a time of extraordinary discovery and progress in astronomy and astrophysics. The next decade will transform our understanding of the universe and humanity's place in it. Every decade the U.S. agencies that provide primary federal funding for astronomy and astrophysics request a survey to assess the status of, and opportunities for the Nation's efforts to forward our understanding of the cosmos. Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s identifies the most compelling science goals and presents an ambitious program of ground- and space-based activities for future investment in the next decade and beyond. The decadal survey identifies three important science themes for the next decade aimed at investigating Earth-like extrasolar planets, the most energetic processes in the universe, and the evolution of galaxies. The Astro2020 report also recommends critical near-term actions to support the foundations of the profession as well as the technologies and tools needed to carry out the science.

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