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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
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Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
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Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
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Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
×
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26362.
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Page 76

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D Biographical Information SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS MATTHEW R. BEGLEY is a professor of mechanical engineering and materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara, having served previously on the faculty at the University of Connecticut (1997-2001) and the University of Virginia (2001- 2009). His research focus is on theoretical mechanics and advanced simulations to guide materials development, with an emphasis on multilayered systems, interfaces, and composites. He has more than 100 archival publications, with topics that include thermal barrier coatings, environmental barrier coatings, the mechanical integrity of microelectronics, advanced simulations of virtual tests, bio-inspired composites and adhesives, novel 3D-printing strategies for two-phase materials, acoustic assembly of colloidal particles, the structural integrity of microelectronics, nano-porous gold, and the performance of microfabricated devices for biochemi- cal diagnostics. He has also served as a consultant regarding material behavior and structural performance, for industries, including nuclear energy (Areva), fuel cell energy (FCE), solar power (Sunpower), biomedical implants (legal consulting, 4WEB), and thin films/coatings (Intel, Pratt & Whitney, Raytheon). BRETT COMPTON is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He earned his Ph.D. in 2012 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Before joining the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Compton did postdoctoral research at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Materials at Harvard University, and he was a materials 67

68 E x p l o i t i n g A d va n c e d M a n u fa c t u r i n g C a pa b i l i t i e s scientist in additive manufacturing for the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge ­National Laboratory. Currently, his work involves developing new high-performance materials for additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and developing the necessary fundamental understanding of AM processes to enable the application of rigorous engineering principles to AM components. This work requires establishing the link between feedstock processing parameters, deposition parameters, and the mechanical and functional properties of the resulting ­materials through mechanical testing, numerical simulation, and modeling. Of particular interest for his research are printable fiber-reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites and multi-material hybrid structures, which represent a huge area of untapped potential now accessible through AM techniques. ­Potential areas of appli­ cation include aerospace, nuclear power, armor, wear ­materials, and lightweight, highly efficient structures for the transportation sector. JOSEPH M. DESIMONE is CEO and co-founder of Carbon, Inc. As a professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC) for more than 20 years before launching Carbon in 2013, he made scientific breakthroughs in several areas, including green chemistry, medical devices, and nanotechnology, also co- founding several companies based on his research. For 3D printing, he brought together insights from ­diverse fields to co-invent the core technology that now drives the Carbon Platform. Powered by Digital Light SynthesisTM (DLSTM) tech- nology, the Carbon Platform is enabling companies to break free of traditional polymer manufacturing methods to advance product innovation. Carbon has cracked the code on 3D printing at scale and is now a 400+ person global company defining the digital revolution in manufacturing. DeSimone studied chemistry at Ursinus College and went on to earn his Ph.D. at Virginia Tech in 1990, joining the faculty at UNC that same year. He quickly achieved international recognition as a scientist, inventor, and entrepreneur, earning major accolades, including the U.S. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award and the Lemelson-MIT Prize. In 2016 President Obama awarded him the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. At UNC, he built a strong culture in his research group centered on the notion that diversity is a fundamental tenet of innovation. He mentored 80 students through Ph.D. completion, half of whom are women and other members of underrepresented groups in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math- ematics). He credits much of his laboratory’s success to this approach, frequently emphasizing how both human and disciplinary diversity accelerate progress in team problem solving. He now implements this perspective at Carbon and con- siders it crucial for Carbon’s position as a world-leading digital manufacturing company operating at the intersection of software, hardware, and material science. An author of more than 350 scientific publications and a named inventor on nearly 200 patents, he maintains academic appointments at both UNC and North

Appendix D 69 Carolina State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Engineering. REBECCA DYLLA-SPEARS received her Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley, in 2009. She is currently a group leader in advanced optical materials and processing science and technology at Lawrence Livermore ­National Laboratory (LLNL), managing efforts to support LLNL’s laser programs. She leads a research program to additively manufacture glass and optics that con- tain functional gradients in material properties. Previously, she has served as a subject-matter expert for growing cryogenic, single-crystalline deuterium-tritium fuel layers for fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility. She helped develop processes for fabrication of specialized laser optics used in the High- Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System and was part of a team that won an R&D 100 Award for her work on polishing slurry stabilization and filtration. She was recognized in 2018 with an early-mid career award at LLNL. JAMES K. GUEST is on the faculty of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University as an associate professor in the Department of Civil Engineer- ing, and he holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. He also leads the university’s Topology Optimization Group, which focuses exclusively on the development and application of ­topology opti- mization algorithms to the design of materials, devices, components, and systems in structural, mechanical, biomedical, and aerospace applications. In addi­tion, he serves as the associate director of the university’s Center for Additive Manufactur- ing and Architected Materials and the Center for Integrated Structure-Materials Modeling and Simulation. An internationally recognized leader in the field of topology optimization, Guest is secretary-general for the International Society for Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization and chair of the technical com- mittee on Optimal Structural Design for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Structural Engineering Institute. He also is a member of the Computa- tional Mechanics Committee of the ASCE Engineering Mechanics Institute (EMI) and a member of the Design Automation Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is an associate editor of the journals Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization and ASME’s Journal of Mechanical Design and a reviewer for more than 30 technical journals. In 2017 Guest received the ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize for his overall impact on the field of topology optimization and engineering mechanics. He also is a recipient of the 2015 EMI Leonardo da Vinci Award from ASCE. Guest received a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering systems from the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He then studied at Princeton University, where he received a master’s degree in civil engineering and operations research in 2001, a master’s degree in civil and

70 E x p l o i t i n g A d va n c e d M a n u fa c t u r i n g C a pa b i l i t i e s environmental engineering in 2002, and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental en- gineering in 2005. FRANCESCO “FRIO” IORIO is co-founder and CEO of Augmenta AI, where he assembles experts from artificial intelligence, advanced computational science, and user-centered design to transform how people understand and design solutions to the world’s most complex problems. Previously, Iorio was director of computational science research at Autodesk Research, where his contributions involved recruiting and leading a group of researchers and engineers in exploring state-of-the-art com- putational science projects and topics, including generative design, machine learning, engineering simulation, computational biology, mathematical optimization, math- ematical modeling, operations research, computational geometry, data a­nalytics, 3D computer graphics, and computer-aided design. Before joining ­Autodesk, he was a solution architect for Next Generation Computing Systems at the IBM High Performance Computing Group in Dublin, Ireland, where he was the lead solution architect for projects related to cell broadband engine processing, with specific focus on accelerating financial, engineering, and digital media workloads using hybrid high-performance computing platforms. Prior to that position, he was a senior real- time software architect at Alias, where he was involved in design and development of high-performance 3D computer graphics software applications. HARDIK KABARIA serves as the computational geometry lead at Carbon, Inc. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanics and computation from Stanford University, under the guidance of Adrian Lew. His doctoral research focused on the develop- ment of an efficient and robust algorithm for geometric discretization in two and three dimensions, where the shape of the geometry is changing over the course of physical simulations of topology optimization. Partially funded by the Army High-Performance Computing Research Center at Stanford, Kabaria also earned a Stanford graduate fellowship to support his research. The algorithm “universal meshes” developed during his doctoral research has now been implemented in Carbon’s codebase to aid the development of Carbon’s process simulation and ­automated texture application software modules. At Carbon, Kabaria currently leads the development of the company’s computational design software tools that help customers take full advantage of the Carbon Digital Light SynthesisTM (­DLSTM) technology. These software tools have helped enable the design and pro- duction various products, including Riddell football helmet liners, specialized bike saddles, and a Johnson & Johnson medical device. ALICIA KIM is the Jacobs Faculty Scholar chair professor in the Structural Engineer­ing Department of the University of California, San Diego. She leads the Multiscale Multi-Physics Design Optimization (M2DO) laboratory. Her interests

Appendix D 71 are in level set topology optimization, multiscale and multi-physics optimization, modeling and optimization of composite materials, and multifunctional structures. She has published more than 200 journal and conference papers in these fields, including award-winning papers at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astro- nautics conferences and at world congresses on structural and multidisciplinary optimization. She is a fellow for growth of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Her research in topology optimization began in the 1890s at the University of Sydney, where she developed one of the first boundary-based topology optimization methods. She continued her research at the University of Warwick and the University of Bath for 15 years before moving to her current position in 2015. MARK R. O’MASTA is a research staff scientist in the architected materials group at HRL Laboratories, LLC. He earned his Ph.D. in material science and engineer- ing from the University of Virginia in 2014. Prior to joining HRL in 2017, he was a research associate in the Centre for Micromechanics at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on developing new materials for additive manu- facturing, the mechanics of materials, and architected materials and composites. He received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in physics from the University of Sydney in 1980 and 1982, respectively. He received a Ph.D. degree in physics from Cornell University in 1985, after which he joined the Physics Department at the California Institute of Technology as a Weingart Fellow from 1984 to 1986. He then served on the faculty of Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York Uni- versity and the University of Utah. He has received numerous honors and awards, including a fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, both in 1988. He was an invited speaker for the 1998 International Congress of Mathematicians. He was awarded the Ralph E. K ­ leinman Prize in 2003 by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics for “his many deep contributions to the modeling and analysis of composite materials.” He also received the 2007 Prager Medal from the Society for Engineering Science, “in rec- ognition of his groundbreaking mathematical analyses of heterogeneous media,” the 2012 Landauer Medal from the ETOPIM association for “excellence in the field of composite science,” and the 2015 Levi-Civita Prize for the Mathematical and Mechanical Sciences. CLAUS PEDERSEN is the optimization technology director at the CTO Office of R&D SIMULIA, Dassault Systèmes, where he has the job role of defining R&D strategies, inventing and examining the technology of new optimization method- ologies, coding of computer-assisted engineering and optimization kernels, com- petitive intelligence, technical due diligence, coaching and knowledge sharing for core optimization technologies, research projects and numerical implementation

72 E x p l o i t i n g A d va n c e d M a n u fa c t u r i n g C a pa b i l i t i e s with different commercial research partners, worldwide presale for customers, and presenting at conferences and corporations with leading international universities. His role is highly interdisciplinary, working with different teams and organizations involving crossover brand activities from R&D, to marketing, to international sales on latest technology. He has continued to have a strong connection to applied sci- ence and research since he received his Ph.D. from the Department of ­Mechanical Engineering of DTU Technical University of Denmark in 2002 and his work the following 2 years as a research associate at the Department of Engineering of Cambridge University. He reviews for 13 international journals and serves as an external examiner at several technical universities and as supervisor of interns. He has published 12 articles in reviewed international journals and given more than 50 presentations at international conferences. He has been working for 20 years in the field of optimization. For the last 15 years his work has been focused on industrial sensitivity-based optimization and developing solutions and apps for function-driven generative design and digital continuity on the 3DEXPERIENCE® Platform and nonlinear adjoint solver technology in the Abaqus framework and other multi-physics solvers, as well as mathematical programming and industrial traditional and additive manufacturing constraints. Thus, he is daily working on technologies in industrial design workflows applied in many sectors, including aerospace, transportation and mobility, industrial equipment, high technology, life sciences, consumer goods, and construction. He is especially focused on contribut- ing on assigning theoretical optimization research into an industrial framework, on leading technologies in industrial design workflows, on industrial optimiza- tion issues as motivation for theoretical research, and on the interaction between academia and industry. REINHARD RADERMACHER holds a Ph.D. in physics and conducts research in heat transfer and working fluids for energy conversion systems, in particular, heat pumps, air conditioners, refrigeration systems, and integrated cooling heating and power systems. His work has resulted in more than 530 publications, numerous invention records, and 14 patents. He has co-authored three books. His research in- cludes the development of software for the design and optimization of heat pumps and air conditioners, which are now in use at more than 80 companies worldwide. He has raised $40 million in research funding from government and industrial sponsors over the years. He is the Minta Martin Professor of Mechanical Engineer- ing at the University of Maryland and director and co-founder of the university’s Center for Environmental Energy Engineering. He was awarded the Institute of Refrigeration J&E Hall Gold Medal and the International Institute of Refrigera- tion (IIR) Gustav Lorentzen Medal for his innovation in the field of refrigeration. He is co-operating agent of International Energy Agency’s (IEA’s) HPT Annex 53 project. He is a fellow of the American ­Society of Heating, Refrigerating and

Appendix D 73 Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), and a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the International Institute of Refrigeration. He is a lifetime member of IJR and ASHRAE, and is the CEO of Optimized Thermal Systems. For 17 years he was the editor of the ASHRAE journal, Science and Tech­ nology for the Built Environment, and he is currently leading the strategic planning committee for ASHRAE research. KIMBERLY SAVIERS is a senior engineer at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in Connecticut. She contributes in the area of thermal and fluid sciences, including topology optimization and electronics cooling. UTRC supports research and innovation for United Technologies Corporation, a large multinational aero- space company. Prior to joining UTRC, she earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engi- neering at Purdue University, in the area of thermal transport in graphene-based materials. She has authored nine peer-reviewed journal publications and has one U.S. patent. She received an award for the best aerospace systems student paper at an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics conference. MARK SHAW is responsible for developing the AddWorksTM government product portfolio for GE Additive, where he has worked since 2017. He works very closely with the aviation regulatory authorities to develop an additive product qualification process roadmap for flight hardware and is one of GE’s primary additive leaders for additive manufacturing qualification and certification. Initially, Shaw was part of the team to integrate the newly acquired concept laser machine business into the recently formed GE Additive business. Subsequently, he moved to lead the GE Aviation LEAP fuel nozzle team, which is believed by some to be the catalyst to begin the industrialization of additive manufacturing. He was an additive techni- cal leader on the GE Catalyst program, which is GE’s first engine with significant additive content, including major engine structures. He was the primary person for GE Additive with regulatory agencies during the certification of both the fuel nozzle the Catalyst. Prior to working with additive technologies, he held various positions of technical, management, and business leadership within GE Aviation, including the GE90 repair shop services engineering leader, combustor design prin- cipal engineer, and engine externals senior staff engineer. Shaw has also worked for Johnson & Johnson as a medical device project director. He has a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Geneva College. OLE SIGMUND is a professor and Villum Investigator at the Department of ­Mechanical Engineering at DTU Technical University of Denmark. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1994 and a habilitation degree in 2001. He has held research positions at the University of Essen and Princeton University. He is a member of the ­Danish Academy of Technical Sciences and the Royal Academy of Science and Letters

74 E x p l o i t i n g A d va n c e d M a n u fa c t u r i n g C a pa b i l i t i e s (Denmark) and is the former president of the International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (2011-2015). He is also the former chair of the Danish Center for Applied Mathematics and Mechanics (2004- 2010). Together with Noboru Kikuchi and Martin Bendsøe, Ole Sigmund is one of the founders and main contributors to the development of topology optimization methods in academia and industry. His present research interests include theoretical extensions and applications of topology optimization methods to mechanics and multi-phys- ics problems under the consideration of manufacturing constraints and multiple length scales. He has authored more than 260 international journal papers that have been cited more than 15,300 times in the Institute for Scientific Information’s Science Citation Index. His H-index, an author-level metric that measures both productivity and citation impact, is 59. CHRISTOPHER M. SPADACCINI is the director of the Center for Engineered ­Materials, Manufacturing and Optimization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has been a member of the technical staff in the Materials Engineer- ing Division for the past 10 years, and he is currently the principal investigator for several advanced materials and additive manufacturing projects. He is also the founder and director of a new additive manufacturing, process development, and architected materials center. The work in these laboratories focuses on developing next-generation additive processes that are capable of micro- and nanoscale fea- tures and have the ability to create components with mixtures of materials rang- ing from polymers to metals and ceramics. Development of these processes also involves the synthesis and materials science of feedstocks, such as photopolymers and nanoparticles. These capabilities are utilized to fabricate micro-architectured materials with unique designer properties, such as negative thermal expansion. He is also a part-time lecturer at the San Jose State University in the ­Biomedical Department and the ­Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, where he teaches graduate courses in advanced transport phenomena. RYAN WATKINS is a mechanical engineer/technologist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). His background is in the experimental characterization and theoretical modeling of shape memory alloys, having received his Ph.D. in aero- space engineering from the University of Michigan in 2015. At JPL, he has worked on flight projects as a structural analyst and, more recently, as a cognizant engineer, leading the design, building, testing, and integration of launch restraint hardware for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) and NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) missions. In conjunction with his flight work, he has worked to develop and foster JPL’s topology optimization capabilities over the past four years, mentoring new practitioners, integrating the work flow into flight project practices, and engaging with the broader topology optimization community

Appendix D 75 XIAOYU (RAYNE) ZHENG is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. His group draws principles from mechanics, optics, and material science to develop additive manufacturing (3D-printing) processes, archi- tected material design, and synthesis approaches to create multifunctional m­ aterials and all-in-one devices with controlled topologies, encoded compositions, and multiscale features. His group actively transfers these materials to a wide array of applications for electronics, structures, robotics, energy storage, and transduction in biology and health care. Their work on architected metamaterials and additive manufacturing had been featured on numerous media outlets, including MIT Technology Review, Top 10 Innovations, R&D 100 Magazine, the covers of Science and Nature Materials. He has over 40 publications and four patents. Zheng has been recognized by various organizations for outstanding research production, includ- ing a Young Faculty Award (2019) from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Young Investigator Award (2018) from the Office of Naval Research, Young Investigator Award (2017) from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, 3M faculty award, Freeform Fabrication and Additive Manufacturing Excellence Award (FAME) from the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, and Outstanding Assistant Professor Award from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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Topology optimization is a digital method for designing objects in order to achieve the best structural performance, sometimes in combination with other physical requirements. Topology optimization tools use mathematical algorithms, such as the finite element method and gradient computation, to generate designs based on desired characteristics and predetermined constraints. Initially a purely academic tool, topology optimization has advanced rapidly and is increasingly being applied to the design of a wide range of products and components, from furniture to spacecraft.

To explore the potential and challenges of topology optimization, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine hosted a two-day workshop on November 19-20, 2019, Exploiting Advanced Manufacturing Capabilities: Topology Optimization in Design. The workshop was organized around three main topics: how topology optimization can incorporate manufacturability along with functional design; challenges and opportunities in combining multiple physical processes; and approaches and opportunities for design of soft and compliant structures and other emerging applications. Speakers identified the unique strengths of topology optimization and explored a wide range of techniques and strengths of topology optimization and explored a wide range of techniques and achievements in the field to date. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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