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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
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Index

A

Age-mediated effects

cost-benefit analysis of fiscal impacts, 22-25

duration of immigrant residency, 303

employment rates across female cohorts, 264, 266

fertility patterns across female cohorts, 249-253

fiscal impacts of immigration, 3, 39-44

household consumption/revenues (California), 156-157, 158-159, 161

household consumption/revenues (New Jersey), 77-80, 81, 90-91

labor market outcomes across female cohorts, 249-253

no fiscal impact of population growth, 27-28

risk of criminal behavior, 370, 375, 381

use of government services, 52

See also Generational modeling

Ages of immigrants, 42, 45

California household characteristics, 133-136

distribution of arriving cohorts, 40-41

historical patterns, 294-295, 299-301

New Jersey household data, 73-75

Aggregate production function, 317-319

Agricultural workers, 310-311

Aid to Families with Dependent Children California government expenditures , 141, 164

New Jersey government expenditures, 101-102, 103

Alcohol use/abuse, 369

Arizona, 413

Phoenix, 397-399

Asian immigrants, 5

in California, 121, 133, 137-140, 141, 151, 158

distribution patterns, 389-392

employment rates across cohorts, 271, 275

New Jersey household fiscal impacts, 81, 82, 85-86

New Jersey sociodemographic data, 73, 75, 77

trends among women, 242

Assimilation

criminal behavior and, 370, 383-384

female immigrants, 9

historical patterns, 292

labor market outcomes across female cohorts, 249-253, 260-261, 265, 270-271, 275-276, 286

labor market outcomes across male cohorts, 270-271

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×
B

Beneficiary societies, 342-343

Bias and discrimination

immigrant risk of imprisonment, 375-376

internal migration and, 404, 424

Bilingual education, 97, 121, 191

Border state crime rates, 378-380

C

California, 3-4, 5-6

distribution of government benefits, 150-153, 175-178

fiscal impacts of immigration, 121-122, 153-168

fiscal impacts research, methodology and data sources, 122-128, 168 -178

government expenditures, 131

government revenues, 128-130, 141-150, 168-175

household characteristics, 131-141, 167-168

immigrant/native tax revenues, 121, 141-150

immigrant population, 120-121

internal migration patterns, 392-393, 394-397, 404, 407, 413, 416, 417, 419-423

Los Angeles, 404, 424-425

patterns of immigration, 120

politics of immigration, 121

San Francisco, 404

significance of, in immigration analysis, 120

Canadian immigrants. See European/Canadian immigrants

Capital-labor ratio, 320-322, 326

Children of immigrants fiscal impacts modeling, 184-185

See also Generational modeling

Colombia, 374-375, 376-377

Colorado, 393

Denver, 399

Commission on Immigration Reform, 1

Consumption behavior demand side modeling, 218

fiscal impacts of immigration, 32-33, 61

of immigrants, 54-55

Corporate sector, 5

Cost-benefit analysis

identifying beneficiaries, 72

intergovernmental modeling, 25-27

multiperiod-analysis, 22-25

theoretical model, 20-22

Countries of origin

criminality research, 370-371

destination patterns and, 390, 412, 425

distribution in prisons, 373-375

employment rates across female cohorts, 261-263

employment rates across female immigrant cohorts, 271

trends, 239

trends among women, 241-242

See also Ethnicity;

specific country or region

Criminal activity, 2, 11

acculturation effects, 370, 383-384

age-mediated risk, 370, 375, 381

arrest rates correlated with immigration rates, 372

in border states, 378-380

challenges to research, 11, 368, 375, 382

costs of incarceration, 177-178

data sources, 368, 372-373, 380-381

detention before trial, 376

drug use among immigrants and, 376-378

early research, 369-371

immigrant group heterogeneity and, 374

immigrant victimization, 382

implications of fertility patterns, 382, 383, 384-385

New York homicide rate, 369-370, 372

number of incarcerated immigrants, 367

organized crime, 371

projections, 382, 383-385

public concern over time, 367-368, 371-372, 378

risk for, 381-382

risk of imprisonment, 375-376

turn of the century immigration law, 368-369

Cross-sectional analysis

concurrent descendants formulation, 184-185

defining concurrent descendants, 186-187, 200

estimating expenditures and revenues, 187-192, 201-204

fiscal impacts (1994-1995), 192-201

fiscal impacts of concurrent descendants, 192-199

immigrant household fiscal impacts, 197-199

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

immigrant household formulation, 184

immigrant-only fiscal impacts, 197-199

immigrant-only formulation, 184

labor market outcomes for female cohorts, 258-260

limitations, 185

rationale, 7, 184, 199-200

research base, 185-186

vs. longitudinal study, 199, 200-201

Cuba, 375

Cultural factors in education, 55-56

D

Demand side modeling, 218

Deportation, 367

Disabled persons, 106-107

Dominican Republic, 375, 376-377

Drug trade and use, 376-378, 381

Duration of residency, 290, 302-305

E

Economic growth

aggregate production function, 317-319

capital-labor ratio, 320-322, 326

defining, 314-315

economies of scale, 328-330

effects on immigration, 290, 305-307

historical patterns, 10

historical supply of human capital, 330-331

immigration effects, 291, 306, 316, 333-334

immigration-related mechanisms of, 10, 291

innovation and invention, 326-328

internal migration patterns, 394, 397, 399

labor force participation of immigrants, 319-320

as labor productivity, 315

measuring immigrant effects, 316-319

physical capital formation, 322-325

upward mobility of immigrants, 350

Economies of scale, 328-330

Education spending

calculating household consumption, 96-100

California, 131, 152, 175-177

as income redistribution, 347-349

1994-1995, 191

Educational attainments, 11

among female immigrant cohorts, 243, 254

California household characteristics, 137-140

cultural factors, 55-56

employment rates across female cohorts, 263, 266, 268-269

fiscal impacts of population growth, 37-39, 46-48, 61

future fiscal inflows from, 61

immigrant destination patterns and, 390

internal migration patterns, 401-404, 406

international factor price convergence, 222

multi-period analysis of fiscal effects, 26

parental factors, 56

trends, 47

wage levels across female immigrant cohorts, 275-276, 277

Educational quality, 38-39

El Salvador, 374-375

Employment-based preferences, 51-52

Employment counseling/training, 104-106

Ethnicity, 5

educational system participation, 347-348

employment rates across female cohorts, 261-263, 271

sociodemographic variation among New Jersey immigrants, 73-77

socioeconomic disparities in high-immigration areas, 425

wage levels across female cohorts, 275-276, 277, 278, 280

See also Countries of origin

Eugenics movement, 369

European/Canadian immigrants, 5

in California, 133, 137-140, 150, 157-158

macroeconomic models, 306, 307

New Jersey household fiscal impacts, 77, 80, 81, 86

New Jersey sociodemographic data, 73, 75, 77

trends among women, 242

F

Factor price equalization, 8, 210

Family reunification, 45, 389

Family structure and functioning

across female immigrant cohorts, 246, 255-258

California household characteristics, 136, 167

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

education outcomes, 55-56

fertility patterns, 349-350, 383, 384-385

fiscal impacts, 45-46

New Jersey household fiscal impacts, 81-82

Female immigrants, 1-2

assimilation effects in labor market outcomes, 249-253, 260-261, 265, 275, 286

census data (1980 and 1990), 247-241

changes across cohorts, 247-249

country of origin trends, 241-242

economic assimilation, 9, 264

educational attainments, 347

educational attainments across cohorts, 243, 254

employment and wage patterns, 9-10

employment rate across cohorts, 243, 249-251, 260-275, 281-286

female-headed households, 52, 53, 82-83, 86

fertility outcomes across cohorts, 246, 248, 255-258

historical patterns, 10, 290, 300-301

human capital variables, 243

labor market outcomes, 239-240

labor market outcomes across cohorts, 243-247, 248, 249-253, 281-287

language skills across cohorts, 243, 254-255

marital status changes across cohorts, 246, 248, 255

research base, 239

wage levels across cohorts, 243-246, 249, 252-253, 275-280

Fiscal impacts of immigration

age-mediated differences, 40-44

California case study, 3-4, 5-6, 121-178

consumption and savings patterns, 32-33

cost-benefit analysis, 20-27

cross-sectional analysis, 7, 184-186, 192-201

effects of immigrant characteristics, 39-40

ethnic variation, 5

general equilibrium modeling, 68-69

generational modeling, 6-7, 15

geographic concentration, 3-4, 11-12, 56-57

historical analysis, 10-11

household-level analysis, 4, 5-6, 66, 69, 87-88

immigrant vs. native households (California), 152-168

immigrant vs. native households (New Jersey), 87, 168

income distribution changes, 334-349

increasing returns to scale, effects of, 30, 60-61, 216-217

legal status of immigrants, 71-72

on local government, 25-27, 68

modeling education effects, 37-39

modeling international trade, 209-219

neutrality model, 27-29, 60

New Jersey case study, 3-5, 6, 69-116

1994-1995, 186, 192-199

nonuniform increases in age groups, 34-37

research base, 2-3, 57-62, 66-69

research design, 3, 6-7, 13-14, 183-186

skill level of immigrants, 33-34, 46-48

theoretical framework for assessing, 2, 3, 14-19, 39-40

top-down vs. bottom-up modeling, 71, 122-123

wage patterns, 48-51

Florida, 191, 399

internal migration patterns, 393, 413

Miami, 397, 404

G

General equilibrium modeling, 68-69

international trade, 208-219

Generational modeling, 6-7

concurrent descendants formulation, 184-185, 186, 192-197, 200-201

educational effects on fiscal impacts, 37-39

fiscal impacts (1994-1995), 192-201

fiscal impacts of immigrant children, 184-185

limitations of cross-sectional approaches, 184-185

local government fiscal modeling, 26

long-run general equilibrium models, 208.

See also specific model

longitudinal, 199, 200-201

multi-period cost-benefit analysis of fiscal impacts, 22-25

nonuniform population growth, fiscal effects of 34-37

theoretical framework, 15

Geographic distribution, 11-12

concentration of immigrants, 389-392, 423-424

federal compensation to high immigration states, 197

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

fiscal impacts, 3-6, 57, 194-197

historical wage differentials, 337-339

internal migration, 12

metropolitan patterns, 394-399

modeling out-migration from high-immigration areas, 413, 416-417, 419-423

patterns, 56-57, 399-401

socioeconomic disparities in high-immigration areas, 425

state trends, 392-394

wage and labor differences, 11-12

See also Internal migration;

specific U.S. state

Georgia, 393, 413

Atlanta, 399

Government services, consumption of

California households, 126-127, 140-141, 150-153, 175-178

California immigrants, 121

cost-benefit analysis, 20-22

family composition factors, 45-46

fiscal impacts of immigration, 3, 60-62

historical patterns, 10-11, 291, 340-343

household level, 5-6

immigrant patterns, 43, 67-68

immigrant skill levels and, 52-54

native-born households, 5-6, 52-54

New Jersey households, 77-86, 93-108

research methodology, 13-14

theoretical model, 15-16

trends in eligibility, 13

Government spending

allocation to households, 70, 89-93

California, 121, 131, 175-178

characteristics of immigrant groups as factor in, 55, 167-168

cost-benefit analysis, 20-22, 25-27

cross-sectional analysis, 201-204

education, 55-56, 77, 80, 347-349

education effects on fiscal impact, 37-39

federal compensation to high immigration states, 197

fiscal impacts of immigration (1994-1995), 192-201

future fiscal inflows from, 61-62

historical income redistribution through social spending, 339-349

immigrant age-mediated effects, 43-46

intergovernmental externalities, 27

intergovernmental transfers, 26-27

investments, 18

multi-period analysis, 22-25

1994-1995, 187-192

old-age support, 345-347

in penal system, 367

public debt management, 19, 30, 187, 188-189

on public goods and services, 16-18, 30-32, 60, 70, 187, 188

theoretical model, 16-19

on transfers, 18-19, 187, 189-191

variation in marginal cost of public services, 30-32

See also Government services, consumption of;

Tax payments

Guatemala, 374-375

H

Heckscher-Olin model of international trade, 211-215

High-skilled labor

in fiscal impacts of population growth, 33-34

historical patterns, 312-313

See also Skill levels of immigrants

High education

allocation of costs/benefits (California), 177

allocation of costs/benefits (New Jersey), 97-100

Hispanic immigrants

criminal activity, 378-379

destination patterns, 390-392

language skills, 48

in prisons, 373-375, 376-378

See also Latin American immigrants

Historical developments, 10-11

African American internal migration, 337

age of immigrants, 42

assimilation of immigrants, 292

capital-labor ratio, 320-322, 326

characteristics of immigrants, 290-291

concerns about criminality and immigration, 367-368, 371-372

distribution of social spending, 339-349

duration of immigrant stay, 302-305

economic growth effects of immigration, 291

economic mobility of immigrants, 350

geographic distribution of immigrants, 56

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

human capital mix of immigrants, 47

immigrant demography, 299-301

immigrant-native wage differentials, 334-339

immigrant savings behavior, 323-325 291-292, 334

income distribution effects of immigration, interpretation of, 289-290

labor force participation of immigrants, 319-320

magnitude of immigration, 290, 292-298

occupations of arriving immigrants, 310-313

physical capital formation, 322-326

relevance to policymaking, 350-352

research base, 289

skills of immigrants, 290-291, 307-310

supply of human capital, 330-331

wage patterns, 48-51, 331-334

Home ownership, 326, 348

Household-level analysis, 5-6

allocation of costs and benefits, 72

allocation of government expenditures and revenues, 70-71, 88-116

California data, 123-125, 131-141

consumption of government services, 5-6, 66-67, 150-153

cross-sectional, 184

educational costs of immigration, 122, 152

female-headed households, 52, 53, 82-83, 86

fiscal impact studies, 4, 5, 66, 69

fiscal impacts of immigration (California), 122

fiscal impacts of immigration (New Jersey), 80-83, 84-86

future research, 87-88

generational modeling, 6-7

immigrant vs. native fiscal impacts, 87, 153-168

legal status issues, 71-72

local government spending (New Jersey), 83-84

methodology, 69, 70-72

New Jersey data, 72-77

rationale, 69-70

significance of, 68

state government spending (New Jersey), 77-80

tax revenues (California), 125-126, 128-130, 141-150

tax revenues (New Jersey), 109-112, 115-116

I

Illegal immigrants, 302, 373

arrest and prosecution, 375-376

fiscal impact modeling, 71-72

tax payments, 68

Illinois

Chicago, 370, 397, 404

internal migration patterns, 392-393, 413, 416

Immigration Reform and Control Act, 293, 301

Incentives to migrate

factor price equalization model, 210

general equilibrium models of international trade, 209-219

immigrant skill linkage, 308

international factor price convergence, 219-223

metropolitan migration patterns, 397

opportunities for innovation, 327

out-migration from high-immigration areas, 401-407

policy effects, 290, 305

push-pull model, 308, 401, 424

state internal migration patterns, 392-394

U.S. economic conditions, 290, 305-307

Income

California households, 140, 159, 167

general effects of immigration, 192

immigration-related redistribution, 334-337

New Jersey immigrant households, 75-77

redistribution through social spending, 339-349

theoretical model, 15-16

See also Wages

Innovation, 326-328

Intergovernmental transfers, 26-27

Internal migration, 2

African Americans, 292, 337

concentration of immigrants, 389-392

demographic variables, 419-420

economic conditions and, 394, 397, 399

educational attainments and, 401-404, 406

from high-immigration areas, 401-407

immigration and, 12

impact analysis, 407-413, 416-417, 419-423

implications, 388, 424-428

labor market effects, 389

local government effects, 25-26

metropolitan patterns, 394-399

motivations, 423-424

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

nested logit model analysis, 410-413, 428-432

patterns, 388-389, 392, 401

policy issues, 410

prejudice and, 404, 424

regional and nonmetro, 399

spillover effects, 420-423

state trends, 392-394

International trade, 8

demand side models, 218

factor content analysis, 224-230

factor price equalization, 8, 210

general equilibrium models, 208-219

Heckscher-Olin model, 211-215

immigration surplus in two-goods economy, 207-208

increasing returns to scale, 216-217

migration linkages, 206, 223-234

modified factor price equalization model, 213-215

policymaking, 231-233

Ricardian model, 215-216

wage levels and, 8-9, 223-234

J

Jamaica, 374-375

L

Labor markets, 8

capital-labor ratio, 320-322

capital ownership by workers, 321-322

economic growth-immigration linkages, 291

employment-based immigration policy, 51-52

employment rates across female cohorts, 243, 249-251, 260-275, 281 -286

employment rates across male cohorts, 269-270, 282-286

geographic variation, 11-12

historical participation of immigrants, 319-320

historical supply of human capital, 330-331

historical wage-immigration linkages, 331-334

immigrant outcomes, 48-51

immigration surplus in two-goods economy, 207-208

impacts of immigration, 2

increasing returns to scale, 216-217

internal migration of less-skilled workers, 407-413, 416-417, 419-423, 425

macroeconomic models of immigration, 306, 307

occupational distribution of arriving immigrants, 50-51

outcomes for immigrant men, 282-286

outcomes for immigrant women, 9-10, 239-240

productivity, 315, 333

upward mobility of immigrants, 350

wage levels across female cohorts, 243-246, 249, 252-253, 275-280, 286

wage-trade linkages, 223-234

wages and, 8-9

Language skills, 48

among female immigrant cohorts, 243, 254-255

bilingual education, 97, 121, 191

employment rates across female cohorts, 263-264, 266-268

Latin American immigrants, 5

in California, 121, 133, 136, 137, 140, 141, 143, 149, 150-151, 158, 163

distribution patterns, 389-392

New Jersey household fiscal impacts, 77-80, 81-82, 86

New Jersey sociodemographic data, 75, 77

in prisons, 373

trends among women, 242

See also Hispanic immigrants

Local government

cost-benefit modeling, 25-27

expense allocation to households, 70

fiscal impacts of immigration, 68, 83-86, 167, 192-193

revenues (California), 130

revenues (New Jersey), 115-116

spending among households (New Jersey), 83-86, 112-115

Longitudinal studies, 2, 6-7, 183-184

vs. cross-sectional analysis, 199, 200-201

M

Marital status

among female immigrant cohorts, 246, 248, 255

employment rates across female immigrant cohorts, 264, 268

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

immigration statistics, 45-46

wage levels across female immigrant cohorts, 275-276, 277

Massachusetts

Boston, 370, 397

internal migration patterns, 393, 413

Medicaid, 78-80, 100-103

California consumption/expenditures, 141

New Jersey government expenditures, 100-101

1994-1995 consumption/expenditures, 191

Medical care

California government expenditures, 131

pharmaceutical assistance, 103-104

Medicare, California consumption/expenditures, 131, 140, 163, 164-165

Mexico

incarcerated immigrants from, 373, 374-375, 381-382

labor market outcomes across emigrant cohorts, 271, 275, 280, 286

migration-trade linkage, 206

Migrant workers, 302

Mortality

determinants of, 40-41

modeling fiscal impacts of immigration, 42-43

N

Natives

consumption of government services, 5-6, 52-54

fertility patterns, 255-258, 349-350

fiscal impacts (California), 141-168

fiscal impacts (New Jersey), 77-86

household characteristics (California), 133, 136, 137, 140-141

incarceration rate, 374

internal migration patterns, 388-389

labor force participation, 319-320

labor market outcomes for women, 266, 268-269

occupational skills, 291, 309-314

out-migration from high-immigration areas, 401-413

out-migration from high-immigration states, 416-417, 419-423

public assistance consumption, 67

savings and consumption patterns, 54-55, 325

taxes paid, 5-6

Nested logit model analysis, 410-413, 428-432

Nevada, 413

Las Vegas, 397-399

New Jersey, 3-5, 6

fiscal impacts of immigration, 68, 69, 168

fiscal impacts research, methodology, and data sources, 86-116

internal migration patterns, 392-393, 407

local expenditures, 112-115

local level fiscal impacts of immigration, 83-86

local revenues, 115-116

sociodemographics of immigrant population, 72-77

state expenditures, 93-108

state level fiscal impacts of immigration, 77-83

state revenues, 109-112

New York

homicide rate, 369-370, 372

internal migration patterns, 392-393, 397, 404, 413, 416, 417, 419 -423

North American Free Trade Agreement, 206

North Carolina, 399

Numbers of immigrants

historical patterns, 10, 290, 292-298

illegal, 373

in jails and prisons, 367, 372-373, 381-382

1994-1995, 186-187

as source of population change, 297-298

O

Old-age support, 345-347

Organized crime, 371

P

Penal system

data sources, 372-373, 380-381

detention before trial, 376, 381

distribution of countries of origin, 373-375, 381

immigrant population in, 367, 372-373, 381-382

immigrant risk of imprisonment, 375-376

native population, 374

Pennsylvania, 413

Philadelphia, 370

Pension systems, 345

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

Physical capital, 322-325

Policymaking

in California, 121

criminal justice issues, 367, 382

effects on immigration, 290, 305

employment-based preferences, 51-52

federal compensation to high immigration states, 197

historical understanding of immigration effects, 350-352

implications of internal migration, 424-428

internal migration patterns, 410

trade and immigration, 231-233

turn of the century immigration law, 368-369

Population growth

fiscal impact modeling, 27-39

immigration as source of change in, 297-298, 314

theoretical framework for modeling, 14, 27

Portland, Oregon, 397-399

Poverty across female immigrant cohorts, 246

Productivity, 315, 333

Prohibition, 369

Property taxes, 107, 147-148, 171-173, 190-191

Public perception and understanding, 404

concerns about immigrant crime, 367-369, 371-372, 378

R

Remigration

historical patterns, 302-305, 306

modeling fiscal effects of immigrants, 41, 42-43

Ricardian model of international trade, 215-216

S

Savings behavior

capital ownership by workers, 321-322

fiscal impacts of immigration, 32-33, 61

generational modeling, 15

home ownership trends, 326

immigrant patterns, 323-325

of immigrants, 54-55

physical capital formation, 322-325

Self-employment, 50, 325

Skill levels of immigrants, 46

consumption of government services and, 52-54

destination patterns and, 390, 412

general equilibrium models of international trade, 209-219

historical trend, 290-291, 308-314

internal migration of low-skilled workers, 409-410

internal migration patterns, 388-389, 404

language fluency, 48

motivation to migrate and, 308

occupational distribution, 50-51, 313-314

occupations on arrival, 310-313

policy issues, 307-308

relative to natives, 291, 309-310

trends, 239

U.S. policy, 51-52

See also Educational attainments;

High-skilled labor;

Unskilled labor

Social Security, 345-347

California consumption/expenditures, 140-141, 143-144, 150, 163, 164-165

immigrant age distribution and, 43

immigrant consumption, 43

1994-1995 consumption/expenditures, 189-190

Supplemental Security Income

California government expenditures, 141, 164

New Jersey government expenditures, 102-103

T

Tax payments, 3

California households, 125-126, 128-130, 141-150, 168-175

California immigrants, 121

cost-benefit analysis of fiscal impacts, 20-22

cross-sectional analysis, 187-192, 201-204

family composition factors, 45-46

fiscal impacts of immigrants (1994-1995), 192-201

historical effects of immigration, 11

immigrant vs. native households, 5-6, 68

multi-period analysis, 23-24

New Jersey households, 80-82, 90, 91, 109-112, 115-116

obstacles to modeling, 185

population growth modeling, 30, 32-33

research methodology, 13-14

theoretical model, 15-16, 19, 27

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
×

transfers, 18-19

worker skill level, multi-period analysis, 33-34

Technological innovation and invention, 326-328

Tennessee, 399

Texas

Austin, 399

El Paso, 376, 378

Houston, 404

internal migration patterns, 392-393, 394, 397, 407, 413, 416

Tourism, 5

Transfer payments, 18-19

age-mediated effects, 43-44

cost-benefit analysis, 20

educational services, 347-349

family composition correlated with, 45-46

income distribution effects of immigration, 291-292, 334

intergovernmental, 26-27

multi-period analysis, 22-23

1994-1995, 187

old-age support programs, 345-347

through social spending, 339-345

uneven distribution of immigration effects, 207

U

Unskilled labor

elasticity of demand, 11-12

in fiscal impacts of population growth, 33-34

geographic variation, 11-12

occupations of arriving immigrants, 310

wage-trade linkage, 223

See also Skill levels of immigrants

W

Wages

across female immigrant cohorts, 243-246, 249, 252-253, 275-281

among male immigrant cohorts, 277-278

capital-labor ratio, 320-321

cohort and assimilation effects, 258-259

estimating, for female immigrants, 241

factor price equilization model, 210

female immigrants, 9-10

general effects of immigration, 192, 291-292

geographic variation, 12

Heckscher-Olin model of international trade, 211-215

immigrant patterns, 48-51

immigration effects, 315, 316, 331-334

immigration-related inequality, 334-339

international factor price convergence, 219-223

international trade and, 8

labor markets and, 8-9

measuring immigrant effects, 317

migration-trade linkage, 206-207, 223-234

regional variation, 337-339

trade vs. immigration effects, 230-231

U.S. trends, 206-207

See also Income

Washington, D.C., 397

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 1998. The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5985.
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The Immigration Debate: Studies on the Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration Get This Book
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The New Americans (NRC 1997) presents an analysis of the economic gains and losses from immigration--for the nation, states, and local areas--providing a scientific foundation for public discussion and policymaking. This companion book of systematic research presents nine original and synthesis papers with detailed data and analysis that support and extend the work in the first book and point the way for future work. The Immigration Debate includes case studies of the fiscal effects of immigration in New Jersey and California, studies of the impact of immigration on population redistribution and on crime in the United States, and much more.

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