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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: Proposed Definition and Plan for Review of Dietary Antioxidants and Related Compounds. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6252.
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Appendix
Acknowledgments

The Panel on Dietary Antioxidants and Related Compounds, the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, and the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) staff are grateful for the time and effort contributed by those individuals who made presentations at the panel's workshop. By openly sharing their considerable expertise and different perspectives, they brought clarity and focus to a challenging task. The panel and committee members, as well as the FNB staff, thank the individuals whose names follow, as well as others who were unnamed:

Rodney Ausich,

Douglas Balentine,

Mary Ellen Camire,

Balz Frei, Debra

K.W. Jahner,

John Landrum,

Mark Levine,

Thomas McClure,

Lester Packer,

Helmut Sies, and

Roger Sunde.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: Proposed Definition and Plan for Review of Dietary Antioxidants and Related Compounds. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6252.
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There has been intense interest recently among the public and the media in the possibility that increased intakes of ''dietary antioxidants'' may protect against chronic disease. Many research programs are underway in this area. Epidemiological evidence suggests that the consumption of fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of both cancer and cardiovascular disease, and it has been hypothesized that this is due in part to the presence of antioxidant compounds in fruits and vegetables. As a result, these compounds have been considered together by many people and loosely termed dietary antioxidants.

Closer examination, however, reveals that compounds typically grouped together as dietary antioxidants can differ quite considerably from one another, both in terms of their chemical behavior and in terms of their biological properties. This report from the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board provides a proposed definition of dietary antioxidants so as to characterize the biological properties of these compounds.

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