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Accelerated Aging of Materials and Structures: The Effects of Long-Term Elevated-Temperature Exposure (1996)

Chapter: Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. Accelerated Aging of Materials and Structures: The Effects of Long-Term Elevated-Temperature Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9251.
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Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

EDGAR A. STARKE, JR. (Chair), received a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Florida. He has held positions at DuPont's Savannah River Laboratory, and at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Virginia where he served as dean of engineering and applied science. He is currently the Earnest Oglesby Professor of materials science at the University of Virginia. Dr. Starke's research is in advanced alloy development, fatigue and fracture, and high-temperature aluminum alloys. He is a member of the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council.

RICHARD H. CORNELIA received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Oregon State University. He is currently a senior research associate in the Advanced Composites Division of the DuPont Company. His expertise is in high-temperature polyimides, composite mechanical properties, carbon fiber properties and performance, high-temperature fiber sizing, high-temperature adhesives, and fractography.

LONGIN B. GRESZCZUK received an M.S. in structural engineering from Purdue University. He is currently senior staff manager and MDC Fellow at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company. His experience has been in theoretical and experimental research in composite micromechanics and macromechanics of composite materials and structures.

LYNETTE M. KARABIN received a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Northwestern University. She is currently a technical specialist in Alcoa's Alloy Technology Division. Her research concerns the development of new heat-treatable alloys and optimization of existing alloys for aerospace.

JOHN J. LEWANDOWSKI received a Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science from Carnegie Mellon University. He is assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. His research is in the effects of microstructure on deformation and fracture of materials.

ASHOK SAXENA received a Ph.D. in materials science and metallurgical engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He is currently director and professor of the School of Materials Engineering and director of the Composites Education and Research Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research is in time-dependent fracture mechanics, microstructure property relationships, creep, and creep-fatigue crack growth, and composite materials.

JAMES C. SEFERIS received a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Delaware. He is Boeing/Steiner Professor of polymeric composite materials at the University of Washington. His interests are in polymer composites, matrix polymers, polymer/composite processing, environmental durability, and thermal analysis.

RICHARD E. TRESSLER received a Ph.D. in ceramic science form the Pennsylvania State University. He is head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. His research concerns the fabrication and mechanical behavior of structural ceramic and composite materials and fracture and strengthening mechanisms.

DOUGLAS D. WARD received an M.S. in materials science from the University of Dayton. He has worked at the Garrett Turbine Engine Company and is currently technical team leader for polymeric composite applications in the Engineering Materials Technology Laboratory at GE Aircraft Engines. His experience includes characterization of high-temperature polymeric composites for commercial and military aircraft applications.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. Accelerated Aging of Materials and Structures: The Effects of Long-Term Elevated-Temperature Exposure. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9251.
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