National Academies Press: OpenBook

New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy (2003)

Chapter: Appendix C: Results of Planetary Community Survey

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Results of Planetary Community Survey." National Research Council. 2003. New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10432.
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Page 221
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Results of Planetary Community Survey." National Research Council. 2003. New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10432.
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Page 222

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Appendix C Results of Planetary Community Survey Mark V. Sykes Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson' Arizona A survey was conducted on Me Plme~ry Community Deeadal Web site ~~ posed two questions: What were Me Free most important discoveries of the pad decade: ~ What are the three most imports investigations that should be done in the next 10 years: The kickoff of Me survey was during ``NASA Night,' ~ the Bum conference of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomic Soeiely (DPSiAAS)' held in New OrIems in Ia~ November 2001. A pme} consisting of Michael Bekon (chair of Be Solar System Exploration Surveys Steering Group)' Be chairs or vice chairs of the SSE Surveys pmels' md Colleen Hartmm ~ASA director of Solar System Exploration) took input from Be audience of more ~m 200 in ~ open forum. The survey was sent out over Be DPSiAAS e-mail exploder md dishibu~d to Be other planets professional societies, directing everyone to the eommunily Web site. Sixly scientists from 37 institutions responded to Be survey. While self-selected md not ~ rigorous sampling of Be planets community' the result do have considerable value ~ ~ guide to what interested groups of people think about md expect from the Solar System Exploration program. It was most interesting ~~ Be eoneatena~d opinions did not produce results that have nof been already extensively discussed. The survey results are as follows: 1~ ~~e most ~mport~t To of lye pmt `~ I. Exhasolar plmets; 2. The Kuiper Bek; md 3. 17~: Oeems beneath Be surfaces of Euro pal C~ymede' md Callisto; md Mars-rela~d discoveries. 1~ ~~e most ~mport~t Go for lee next ~~ I. The Kuiper Bek-Pluto mission (largest individual recommendation); 2. Missions to md ground-based studies of asteroids md comets; md 3. 17~: Study of extrasolar planets; md study md search for conditions under which life might exist.

Next: Appendix D: Summary of the Planetary Society’s Public Opinion Survey »
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Solar system exploration is that grand human endeavor which reaches out through interplanetary space to discover the nature and origins of the system of planets in which we live and to learn whether life exists beyond Earth. It is an international enterprise involving scientists, engineers, managers, politicians, and others, sometimes working together and sometimes in competition, to open new frontiers of knowledge. It has a proud past, a productive present, and an auspicious future. This survey was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to determine the contemporary nature of solar system exploration and why it remains a compelling activity today. A broad survey of the state of knowledge was requested. In addition NASA asked for the identifcation of the top-level scientific questions to guide its ongoing program and a prioritized list of the most promising avenues for flight investigations and supporting ground-based activities.

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