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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
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C
Contributors

When the Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century project was initiated in 2000, the Committee solicited input from the chemical sciences community. A specific request for input was sent via e-mail to a large number of scientists and engineers, and a general request for information appeared in Chemical & Engineering News.1 In addition to the responses to these requests, input from the broader community was obtained as the committee wrote this report, when individual members of the committee consulted with their colleagues to obtain specific and detailed technical input. The committee is pleased to acknowledge the assistance of all these contributors:

Harold M. Agnew, San Diego Supercomputer Center

Mikael Akke, Lund University

Robert J. Angelici, Iowa State University

Gary C. April, University of Alabama

Mick J. Apted, Monitor Scientific

Frances H. Arnold, California Institute of Technology

David Awschalom, University of California, Santa Barbara

Robert E. Babcock, University of Arkansas

Christina A. Bailey, California Polytechnic State University

James K. Bashkin, Monsanto Company

Patricia A. Baisden, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

R. Stephen Berry, University of Chicago

1  

“Your Ideas, Please!” Madeleine Jacobs, Editor-in-chief, Chemical & Engineering News, 78(14), April 3, 2000.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
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Bruce J. Berne, Columbia University

Lorenz T. Biegler, Carnegie Mellon University

Mary P. Boyle, George Mason University

John F. Brady, California Institute of Technology

Jean-Claude Bradley, Drexel University

Thomas B. Brill, University of Delaware

Joseph F. Bunnett, University of California, Santa Cruz

Laurie J. Butler, University of Chicago

Richard A. Caldwell, University of Texas, Dallas

Arthur Cammers-Goodwin, University of Kentucky

James A. Carroll, University of Nebraska

A. Welford Castleman, Jr., The Pennsylvania State University

Arup K. Chakraborty, University of California, Berkeley

Michael J. Clarke, Boston College

Edward L. Clennan, University of Wyoming

Geoff W. Coates, Cornell University

Robert Graham Cooks, Purdue University

Peter T. Cummings, Vanderbilt University

Christopher C. Cummins, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dady B. Dadyburjor, West Virginia University

Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology

Robert H. Davis, University of Colorado

Ken A. Dill, University of California, San Francisco

Frank J. DiSalvo, Cornell University

Jerry R. Ebner, Monsanto Company

Warren Eister, Gaithersburg, Md.

Arthur B. Ellis, University of Wisconsin-Madison

J. Eric Enholm, University of Florida

Thomas P. Fehlner, University of Notre Dame

Dan Feldheim, North Carolina State University

L. Frank Flora, United States Department of Agriculture

Henry C. Foley, The Pennsylvania State University

Felice Frankel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Glenn H. Fredrickson, University of California, Santa Barbara

Richard Friesner, Columbia University

Sujata Gamage, Ohio State University

Bruce C. Gates, University of California, Davis

Robert E. Gawley, University of Miami

Andrew J. Gellman, Carnegie Mellon University

Thomas F. George, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Judith C. Giordan, Aileron Partners

Wayne L. Gladfelter, University of Minnesota

David S. Glueck, Dartmouth College

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×

David B. Graves, University of California, Berkeley

Stephen E. Griffin, InnovaQuartz, Inc.

Michael L. Gross, Washington University

Georges A. Guiochon, The University of Tennessee

Jane Halverson, Yale University

Bryce E. Hathoorn, Deere & Company

Steinar Hauan, Carnegie Mellon University

James F. Haw, University of Southern California, University Park

Fred M. Hawkridge, Virginia Commonwealth University

Heinz Heinemann, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Joseph J. Helble, University of Connecticut

George R. Helz, University of Maryland, College Park

Craig L. Hill, Emory University

George M. Homsy, University of California, Santa Barbara

Paul A. Jennings, Florida Institute of Technology

Michael P. Harold, DuPont

Howard E. Katz, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies

James R. Katzer, ExxonMobil

C. Judson King, University of California, Office of the President

Douglas A. Klumpp, California State Polytechnic University

Gustavo Larsen, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Ronald G. Larson, University of Michigan

Robert L. Letsinger, Northwest University

Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology

James W. Libby, DuPont (retired)

Stephen J. Lippard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Raul F. Lobo, University of Delaware

Nichalos T. Loux, Environmental Protection Agency

Andrew J. Lovinger, National Science Foundation

Peter Lykos, Illinois Institute of Technology

Patricia Ann Mabrouk, Northeastern University

Preston J. MacDougall, Middle Tennessee State University

Alexander Maclachlan, DuPont (retired)

Vladimir Mahalec, Aspen Technology, Inc.

Wolfgang Marquardt, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen

Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University

Stephen L. Matson, Sepracor, Inc.

James M. Mayer, University of Washington

David McCollum, Merck & Company, Inc.

Henry A. McGee, Jr., Virginia Commonwealth University

Thomas J. Meyer, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Larry L. Miller, University of Minnesota

Scott J. Miller, Boston College

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×

Karen W. Morse, Western Washington University

Heather S. Mortell, Neenah, Wis.

James S. Murday, National Research Laboratory

Catherine J. Murphy, University of South Carolina

James Y. Oldshue, Oldshue Technologies International, Inc.

Thomas L. Netzel, Georgia State University

Mark Nicholas, AstraZeneca International

Tucker Norton, DuPont

James S. Nowick, University of California, Irvine

Ralph G. Nuzzo, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Babatunde A. Ogunnaike, DuPont

Julio M. Ottino, Northwestern University

Costas C. Pantelides, Imperial College, London

Leo A. Paquette, The Ohio State University

David H. Petering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Gene Petersen, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Steve Picataggio, DuPont

Thomas J. Pinnavaia, Michigan State University

Elizabeth J. Podlaha, Louisiana State University

Tomas D. Pollard, the Salk Institute of Biological Studies

Stephen W. Ragsdale, University of Nebraska

Thomas B. Rauchfuss, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Michael Reagan, Van Dyke, Pace, and Westlake

Elsa Reichmanis, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies

R. Russel Rhinehart, North Oklahoma State University

William Rosen, University of Rhode Island

John Ross, Stanford University

James F. Roth, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (retired)

William B. Russel, Princeton University

Lynn M. Russell, Princeton University

Sarah C. Rutan, Virginia Commonwealth University

Dalibor Sames, Columbia University

Edward T. Samulski, University of North Carolina

Stanley I. Sandler, University of Delaware

Alfred P. Sattelberger, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Martin Saunders, Yale University

Jacqueline Savani, University of California, Santa Barbara

Richard H. Schlosberg, Bridgewater, N.J.

Fred G. Schreiber, Livingston, N.J.

James Scinta, Phillips Petroleum

Edmund G. Seebauer, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Raymond Seltzer, Ciba Specialty Chemicals Company

Fred R. Sheldon, Yale University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×

David A. Shirley, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

James P. Shoffner, Columbia College

Panagiotis G. Smirniotis, University of Cincinnati

Paul H. Smith, United States Department of Energy

Edward I. Solomon, Stanford University

Jack Solomon, Praxair

Gabor A. Somorjai, University of California, Berkeley

David M. Stanbury, Auburn University

Arnold F. Stancell, Georgia Institute of Technology

Wayne E. Steinmetz, Pomona College

J. Fraser Stoddart, University of California, Los Angeles

Carlyle B. Storm, Gordon Research Conferences

Rex C. Stratton, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Eric M. Stuve, University of Washington

William C. Stwalley, University of Connecticut

Kimberly Thomas, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Randolph P. Thummel, University of Houston

Paul F. Torrence, Northern Arizona University

Joan S. Valentine, University of California, Los Angeles

David E.W. Vaughan, Pennsylvania State University

David L. Venezky, Naval Research Laboratory

John G. Verkade, Iowa State University

Dionisios G. Vlachos, University of Massachusetts

David L. Van Vranken, University of California, Irvine

Robert S. Weber, Arthur D. Little, Inc.

John C. Wright, University of Wisconsin-Madison

John T. Yates, University of Pittsburgh

Ahmed H. Zewail, California Institute of Technology

Steven C. Zimmerman, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Raymond R. Zolandz, DuPont

Charles F. Zukoski, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Contributors." National Research Council. 2003. Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10633.
×
Page 208
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Chemistry and chemical engineering have changed significantly in the last decade. They have broadened their scope—into biology, nanotechnology, materials science, computation, and advanced methods of process systems engineering and control—so much that the programs in most chemistry and chemical engineering departments now barely resemble the classical notion of chemistry. Beyond the Molecular Frontier brings together research, discovery, and invention across the entire spectrum of the chemical sciences—from fundamental, molecular-level chemistry to large-scale chemical processing technology. This reflects the way the field has evolved, the synergy at universities between research and education in chemistry and chemical engineering, and the way chemists and chemical engineers work together in industry.

The astonishing developments in science and engineering during the 20th century have made it possible to dream of new goals that might previously have been considered unthinkable. This book identifies the key opportunities and challenges for the chemical sciences, from basic research to societal needs and from terrorism defense to environmental protection, and it looks at the ways in which chemists and chemical engineers can work together to contribute to an improved future.

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