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Materials Science and Technology: Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century (2003)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Materials Science and Technology: Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10694.
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B Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members

Klavs F. Jensen (Co-chair) is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research area is processing and characterization of advanced inorganic materials, including chemical vapor deposition of semiconductors and metals, laser-assisted processing and fabrication of inorganic composites; synthesis and characterization, as well as mathematical models. He received his M.Sc. from the Technical University of Denmark, 1976, and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1980.

Charles Kresge (Co-chair) is the Global R&D Director for the Chemical Sciences Capability, Corporate Research & Development, of The Dow Chemical Company. His expertise is in the area of catalytic synthesis, characterization, and applications. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California.

Tobin J. Marks is Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University. He is an inorganic chemist with research interests in transition metal and f-element organometallic chemistry, catalysts, vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, synthetic facsimiles of metalloprotein active sites, and carcinostatic metal complexes. He received his B.S. degree from the University of Maryland and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Julia M. Philips is currently at Sandia National Laboratories. Her research area is development and implementation of models of materials and processes that link the processing of materials with their performance via their microstructure, development and deployment of models for extraction of information during

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Materials Science and Technology: Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10694.
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materials processing. She received her Ph.D. in applied physics from Yale University.

Elsa Reichmanis is Supervisor of radiation, sensitive materials and applied groups at Lucent Technologies. Her research specialty is chemistry, properties and application of radiation sensitive materials, particularly as they relate to resists and other materials for lithographic applications electronic materials. She received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Syracuse University. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

David A. Tirrell is Ross McCollum-William H. Corcoran Professor and Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Chair of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His areas of research are in the development of new polymeric systems of controlled molecular and supramolecular architectures, specifically, artificial proteins and flexible polymeric nanowires and nanotubes. He received his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974, and his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1978.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Materials Science and Technology: Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10694.
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Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of the Organizing Committee Members." National Research Council. 2003. Materials Science and Technology: Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10694.
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Page 55
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The report assesses the current state of chemistry and chemical engineering at the interface with materials science and identifies challenges for research. Recent advances are blurring the distinction between chemistry and materials science and are enabling the creation of new materials that, to date, have only been predicted by theory. These advances include a greater ability to construct materials from molecular components, to design materials for a desired function, to understand molecular "self-assembly, and to improve processes by which the material is "engineered" into the final product.

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