National Academies Press: OpenBook

Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004)

Chapter: Appendix J: Glossary

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
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J
Glossary


Amenity benefits/services

utility (satisfaction, pleasure) derived from sportfishing and other recreation activities or from other activities based on the environment such as experiencing or contemplating scenic beauty, wildlife, or a healthy ecosystem.


Broodstock

adult animals that are spawned to provide larvae for hatchery production.


Clean list

a regulatory approach that prohibits introduction of a nonnative species unless it is included on a list of approved (i.e. not harmful) species.

Cultchless

a technique for growing oysters individually, usually for the half-shell market. The oyster larvae are induced to settle on loose material such as ground shell rather than whole shells.


Diploid

refers to animals whose cells contain two sets of chromosomes, the normal genetic state for oysters.

Dirty list

a regulatory approach that prohibits introduction of species identified as unacceptable and allows introduction of unlisted species.

Dockside value

dollar amount received by watermen at the dock.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
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Epizootic

a transient disease event in an animal population.

Eutrophication

nutrient enrichment of water bodies, generally referring to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus.


Host

organism in which a parasite or other infectious agent lives.


Infection

presence of a parasite in a host, with or without the development of disease.

Invasive species

a nonindigenous organism that spreads from the site of introduction, becomes abundant, and may displace native species.


Mosaic

animal containing both diploid and triploid cells.


Nominal value

value in current dollars.

Nonindigenous

species found outside its natural geographical range. Also referred to as alien, nonnative, or exotic.


Pathogen

disease-producing organism.


Real price –

nominal price adjusted for inflation.

Reversion

production of normal diploid cells in an otherwise triploid animal.

Rogue introduction

a non-sanctioned, direct release of diploid reproductive oysters.


Sed quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Latin phrase translated as: “Who is to guard the guards themselves?”

Seed

a young oyster, especially one suitable for transplanting to another bed.

Skipjacks

sail-powered wooden vessels native to the Chesapeake Bay that are used for commercial dredging of oysters.

Sociocultural

learned knowledge, values and behaviors that are shared among members of a group, community or region.

Spat

juvenile oysters from the time of settlement through the first year of growth.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
×

Spatfall

the settlement of juvenile oysters onto a substrate.


Triploid

refers to animals whose cells contain three sets of chromosomes rather than the normal two sets. This condition inhibits the ability of the animal to make viable eggs or sperm, reducing fertility to a small percentage of the reproductive capacity of a normal diploid animal.


Zoosanitary

clean and healthy conditions for animal husbandry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
×
Page 320
Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
×
Page 321
Suggested Citation:"Appendix J: Glossary." National Research Council. 2004. Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10796.
×
Page 322
Next: Appendix K: Scientific and Common Names »
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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay discusses the proposed plan to offset the dramatic decline in the bay’s native oysters by introducing disease-resistant reproductive Suminoe oysters from Asia. It suggests this move should be delayed until more is known about the environmental risks, even though carefully regulated cultivation of sterile Asian oysters in contained areas could help the local industry and researchers. It is also noted that even though these oysters eat the excess algae caused by pollution, it could take decades before there are enough of them to improve water quality.

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