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Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust (2011)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
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Appendix B
Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists

January 11, 2010


Keck Center of The National Academies

500 Fifth Street, N.W., Room 100

Washington, DC

8:30 am

PUBLIC FORUM

 

Ethan Basch, American Society of Clinical Oncology

Christopher Bever, Chair, Quality Measures and Reporting, American Academy of Neurology

Terrie Cowley, President and Cofounder, The Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorders Association

Steven Findlay, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Consumers Union

Merrill Goozner, Editor and Publisher, Health Tech Review/GoozNews.com

David Paul Harries, International Spine Intervention Society

Belinda Ireland, Senior Epidemiologist, BJC HealthCare

Norman Kahn, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, Council of

Medical Specialty Societies Lisa Mojer-Torres, Chair, Citizens’ Advisory Council for the Division of Addiction Services, State of New Jersey (via telephone)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×

 

Katherine Nordal, Executive Director for Professional Practice, American Psychological Association

Jennifer Padberg, Vice President of Clinical Affairs, Infectious Diseases Society of America

William Rich, Medical Director of Health Policy, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Richard Rosenfeld, Guideline Development Task Force, American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery

Kathleen Sazama, President, Society for the Advancement of Blood Management

Aryeh Shander, President-Elect, Society for the Advancement of Blood Management

Christopher Wolfkiel, Director of Practice Guidelines, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Diana Zuckerman, President, National Research Center for Women & Families

Moderated by Dr. Sheldon Greenfield

COMMITTEE Q&A

10:05

PANELS BEGIN

10:05

Panel One: Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) Developers I

Alice Jacobs, M.D., American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA)

Joan McClure, M.D., National Comprehensive Cancer Network

Katrin Uhlig, M.D., M.S., National Kidney Foundation

Jim Schibanoff, M.D., Milliman Care Guidelines

Michael Bettmann, M.D., American College of Radiology

Moderated by Dr. Sheldon Greenfield

11:30

Panel Two: CPG Developers II

Ted Ganiats, M.D., Family Physician

Sandra Zelman Lewis, Ph.D., American College of Chest Physicians

Laura Fochtmann, M.D., American Psychiatric Association

Vincenza Snow, M.D., American College of Physicians

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×

 

William G. Adams, M.D., FAAP, American Academy of Pediatrics

Moderated by Dr. Sheldon Greenfield

12:50–1:20 pm

BREAK

1:20

Panel Three: Government CPG Developers and Other Government-Sponsored CPG Initiatives

Vivian Coates, M.B.A., National Guidelines Clearinghouse/ECRI Institute

David Atkins, M.D., M.P.H., Veterans Administration

Nita L. Seibel, M.D., National Cancer Institute

Denise Simons-Morton, M.D., Ph.D., National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Moderated by Dr. Earl Steinberg

2:45

Panel Four: Organizational CPG Consumers

Marguerite Koster, M.A., M.F.T., Kaiser Permanente Southern California

Kent Bottles, M.D., Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

Louis B. Jacques, M.D., Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Richard Kahn, Ph.D., Former Chief Scientific and Medical Officer of the American Diabetes Association

Elizabeth Mort, M.D., M.P.H., Vice President, Quality and Safety, Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts General Physicians Organization

Moderated by Dr. Earl Steinberg

4:10

Panel Five: Clinician and Patient CPG Consumers

Cynthia Boyd, M.D., M.P.H., Physician Expert in Multimorbidity, Johns Hopkins Department of Medicine

Arleen Brown, M.D., Ph.D., Physician Expert in Health Disparities, UCLA Internal Medicine

Karen Kelly-Thomas, Ph.D., R.N., CAE, FAAN, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

Joyce Dubow, AARP

Zobeida Bonilla, Ph.D., Our Bodies Ourselves

Moderated by Dr. Earl Steinberg

5:30

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×

Questions for the Panelists

  • What do you believe are the biggest challenges clinical practice guidelines developers/users face today? For example:

    • What do you do when the scientific evidence is absent or poor?

    • How do you reconcile disagreements in evidence interpretation among guidelines?

    • How do guidelines accommodate subgroups (e.g., older populations or persons with multimorbidities) whose treatment outcomes may differ from the average patient?

    • Are there other challenges you believe are important?

  • What topics and/or processes do you think the committee should consider in deriving quality standards for clinical practice guidelines? For example:

    • What should the composition of CPG development panels, in particular the balance of methodologists, topical experts, and consumers, look like?

    • What methods might be developed for determining which recommendations among those in a guideline should be applied to quality measures or electronic medical record decision prompts?

    • Is there an available assessment tool that adequately rates both the level of the scientific evidence and strength of clinical recommendations that should be used as standard practice in guideline development?

    • What administrative (e.g., accreditation) or legal approaches might improve the quality of clinical practice guidelines?

    • What explicit approaches might harmonize guideline developers and increase guidelines convergence?

    • What types of strategies might promote greater use of guidelines?

    • Are there other characteristics of guideline standards you think are important for the committee to consider?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 210
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 211
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda and Questions to Panelists." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 212
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Advances in medical, biomedical and health services research have reduced the level of uncertainty in clinical practice. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) complement this progress by establishing standards of care backed by strong scientific evidence. CPGs are statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care. These statements are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and costs of alternative care options. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust examines the current state of clinical practice guidelines and how they can be improved to enhance healthcare quality and patient outcomes.

Clinical practice guidelines now are ubiquitous in our healthcare system. The Guidelines International Network (GIN) database currently lists more than 3,700 guidelines from 39 countries. Developing guidelines presents a number of challenges including lack of transparent methodological practices, difficulty reconciling conflicting guidelines, and conflicts of interest. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust explores questions surrounding the quality of CPG development processes and the establishment of standards. It proposes eight standards for developing trustworthy clinical practice guidelines emphasizing transparency; management of conflict of interest ; systematic review--guideline development intersection; establishing evidence foundations for and rating strength of guideline recommendations; articulation of recommendations; external review; and updating.

Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust shows how clinical practice guidelines can enhance clinician and patient decision-making by translating complex scientific research findings into recommendations for clinical practice that are relevant to the individual patient encounter, instead of implementing a one size fits all approach to patient care. This book contains information directly related to the work of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), as well as various Congressional staff and policymakers. It is a vital resource for medical specialty societies, disease advocacy groups, health professionals, private and international organizations that develop or use clinical practice guidelines, consumers, clinicians, and payers.

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