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Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust (2011)

Chapter: Appendix E: Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
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Appendix E
Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines

SEARCH CONTENT

  1. OVID Databases:

    1. Ovid MEDLINE® In-process and Other Non-indexed Citations and Ovid MEDLINE® (1950–Present): The U.S. National Library of Medicine’s® bibliographic database providing information on medicine, nursing , dentistry, veterinary medicine, allied health, and preclinical sciences.

    2. EMBASE (1988–September 2009): A biomedical database produced by Elsevier. EMBASE covers nearly 5,000 active journals, of which nearly 2,000 are unique compared with MEDLINE.

    3. PsycINFO (1987–September 2009): A database containing a wide variety of scholarly publications in the behavioral and social sciences.

    4. Global Health (1973–2009): An abstracting and indexing database dedicated to public health research and practice.

  1. Web of Science (1900–2009): Current and retrospective coverage in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Its content covers more than 10,000 of the highest impact journals worldwide, including Open Access journals, and over 110,000 conference proceedings.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
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  1. Electronic Tables of Contents:

    1. E-mail alerts via LexisNexis and OVID of the following publications’ tables of contents: EPC reports, JAMA, NEJM, J of Clin Epi, BMJ, Health Affairs, Health Qual Life Out, Med Care, Milbank Q, Med Decis Making, Health Serv Res, Eval Health Prof, Qual Saf Health Care, Med Care Res Rev, J Health Econ, Health Econ, Health Policy Plan, J of Health Polit Polic, Health Policy, J of Public Health Pol, Implementation Science.

  1. Grey Literature (conference proceedings, PowerPoint presentations, unpublished manuscripts):

    1. NTIS (1964–present): A resource for accessing the latest research sponsored by the United States and select foreign governments.

    2. New York Academy of Medicine.

    3. GIN Database.

    4. Government clinical practice guideline development groups: AHRQ, NICE, SIGN, NZGG, GAC.

    5. Search websites of AGREE, GRADE, AHIP, BCBS Tec, Kaiser Permanente, KFF, RWJF.

SEARCH PROCESS

  1. Search each database uniquely.

  2. Limit to English and human studies.

  3. Search clinical practice guideline or practice guideline in the subject heading.

  4. Search the following in the title or abstract: consensus development or decision making, development, evaluation, implementation, comorbidities, heterogeneity, policy or law or legal, implications, tool or taxonomy, reimbursement, measurement, performance or performance measures, consumer or public, grading or rating, issues or concerns, methods, quality, electronic medical record (EMR) or computer decision support system (CDSS).

  5. Two independent reviewers track subject headings and key terms in key articles and use to further electronic search.

  6. Two independent reviewers screen article abstracts and full articles to determine if they fit the committee’s charge.

  7. Handsearch cited references within key identified literature.

  8. Manage references in EndNote.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Literature Search Strategy: Clinical Practice Guidelines." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13058.
×
Page 256
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Advances in medical, biomedical and health services research have reduced the level of uncertainty in clinical practice. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) complement this progress by establishing standards of care backed by strong scientific evidence. CPGs are statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care. These statements are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and costs of alternative care options. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust examines the current state of clinical practice guidelines and how they can be improved to enhance healthcare quality and patient outcomes.

Clinical practice guidelines now are ubiquitous in our healthcare system. The Guidelines International Network (GIN) database currently lists more than 3,700 guidelines from 39 countries. Developing guidelines presents a number of challenges including lack of transparent methodological practices, difficulty reconciling conflicting guidelines, and conflicts of interest. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust explores questions surrounding the quality of CPG development processes and the establishment of standards. It proposes eight standards for developing trustworthy clinical practice guidelines emphasizing transparency; management of conflict of interest ; systematic review--guideline development intersection; establishing evidence foundations for and rating strength of guideline recommendations; articulation of recommendations; external review; and updating.

Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust shows how clinical practice guidelines can enhance clinician and patient decision-making by translating complex scientific research findings into recommendations for clinical practice that are relevant to the individual patient encounter, instead of implementing a one size fits all approach to patient care. This book contains information directly related to the work of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), as well as various Congressional staff and policymakers. It is a vital resource for medical specialty societies, disease advocacy groups, health professionals, private and international organizations that develop or use clinical practice guidelines, consumers, clinicians, and payers.

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