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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Select References." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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A

Select References

ARTICLES

Amato, I. 2007. Experiments of concern: Well-intentioned research, in the wrong hands, can become dangerous. Chemical and Engineering News 85(31):51-55.

Amato, I. 2009. Rebecca Kamen: A sculptor nurtures an elemental garden. Chemical and Engineering News 87(40):43-43.

Falk, J.H., and L.D. Dierking, 2010. The 95 percent solution (School is not where most Americans learn most of their science). American Scientist 98:486-493.

Friedman, A.J. 2010. The evolution of the science museum. Physics Today (October):45-51.

Halford, B. 2008. Stephen Lyons: A television producer’s take on what makes good chemistry for the small screen. Chemical and Engineering News 86(39):41.

Maltese, A.V., and R.H. Tai. 2010. Eyeballs in the fridge: Sources of early interest in science. International Journal of Science Education 32(5):669-685.

BOOKS

Ball, P. 1999. H2O: A Biography of Water. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson Ltd.

Bradley, C.A. 2009. The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. New York: Delacorte Press.

Emsley, J. 2008. Molecules of Murder: Criminal Molecules and Classic Cases. London: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Frankel, F., and G. M. Whitesides. 2009. No Small Matter: Science on the Nanoscale. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Griep, M., and M. Mikasen. 2009. ReAction! Chemistry in the Movies. New York: Oxford University Press.

Levi, P., R. Rosentha, and N. Ascherson. 1995. The Periodic Table. London: D. Campbell.

Sacks, O.W. 2001. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Stephenson, N. 1995. The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer. New York: Bantam Dell.

NRC PUBLICATIONS

Philip Bell, Bruce Lewenstein, Andrew W. Shouse, and Michael A. Feder, Editors, Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments, National Research Council. 2009. Learning Science in Informal Environments. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Marilyn Fenichel and Heidi A. Schweingruber, National Research Council. 2010. Surrounded by Science. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Select References." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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WEBSITES

Chemical Heritage Foundation www.chemheritage.org
Community Based Environmental Monitoring Network www.envnetwork.smu.ca/
Exploratorium www.exploratorium.edu/
Felice Frankel www.felicefrankel.com/
Forgotten Genius www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/julian/
Theodore Gray www.theodoregray.com/
The History Makers www.thehistorymakers.com/
Roald Hoffman www.roaldhoffmann.com/
Informal Science www.informalscience.org
International Year of Chemistry 2011 www.chemistry2011.org
Molecularium www.moleculestothemax.com/
Marvelous Molecules www.nyhallsci.org/marvelousmolecules/
Nanoscale Informal Science Education www.nisenet.org/
Periodic Table of Videos www.periodicvideos.com/
Science and Entertainment Exchange www.scienceandentertainmentexchange.org/
Science Cafés www.sciencecafes.org/
Science Cheerleader www.sciencecheerleader.com/
Science is Fun www.scifun.org/
World Water Monitoring Day www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Select References." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Select References." National Research Council. 2011. Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13106.
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Chemistry in Primetime and Online: Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary Get This Book
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It is critical that we increase public knowledge and understanding of science and technology issues through formal and informal learning for the United States to maintain its competitive edge in today's global economy. Since most Americans learn about science outside of school, we must take advantage of opportunities to present chemistry content on television, the Internet, in museums, and in other informal educational settings.

In May 2010, the National Academies' Chemical Sciences Roundtable held a workshop to examine how the public obtains scientific information informally and to discuss methods that chemists can use to improve and expand efforts to reach a general, nontechnical audience. Workshop participants included chemical practitioners (e.g., graduate students, postdocs, professors, administrators); experts on informal learning; public and private funding organizations; science writers, bloggers, publishers, and university communications officers; and television and Internet content producers. Chemistry in Primetime and Online is a factual summary of what occurred in that workshop.

Chemistry in Primetime and Online examines science content, especially chemistry, in various informal educational settings. It explores means of measuring recognition and retention of the information presented in various media formats and settings. Although the report does not provide any conclusions or recommendations about needs and future directions, it does discuss the need for chemists to connect more with professional writers, artists, or videographers, who know how to communicate with and interest general audiences. It also emphasizes the importance of formal education in setting the stage for informal interactions with chemistry and chemists.

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