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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2012. Approaches for Ecosystem Services Valuation for the Gulf of Mexico After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13141.
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B

Acronyms

AVHRR

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

BOEMRE

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement

CERCLA

Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation Liability Act

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CI

Continental Index

CRMS

Coastwide Reference Monitoring System

CVM

Contingent Valuation Method

CWPPRA

Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act

DO

Dissolved Oxygen

DOC

Dissolved Organic Carbon

DOM

Dissolved Organic Material

DWH

Deep Water Horizon

EEZ

Exclusive Economic Zone

EMAP-E

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries

EPA

Environmental Protection Agency

GC-MS

Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

GIS

Geographic Information System

GoM

Gulf of Mexico

GOMFMC

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council

HEA

Habitat Equivalency Analysis

HTCO

High-Temperature Catalytic Oxidation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2012. Approaches for Ecosystem Services Valuation for the Gulf of Mexico After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13141.
×

LCE

Loop Current Eddy

LIDAR

Light Detection and Ranging

LME

Large Marine Ecosystem

LUMCON

Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

MRIP

Marine Recreational Information Program

NAAQS

National Ambient Air Quality Standard

NCOM

Navy Coastal Ocean Model

NDBC

National Data Buoy Center

NGO

Non-governmental Organization

NOAA

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NOEP

National Ocean Economics Program

NRDA

Natural Resource Damage Assessment

OCPR

Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration

OMA

Oil-Mineral Aggregate

OPA

Oil Pollution Act

PAH

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

REA

Resource Equivalency Analysis

RS

Remote Sensing

RUF

Restoration Up Front

SAV

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

SAY

Service Acre Year

SCOR

Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research

SeaWiFS

Sea-viewing Wide Field Sensor

SET

Surface-Elevation Table

SPM

Suspended Particulate Matter

TI

Tropical Index

USGS

U.S. Geological Survey

VOC

Volatile Organic Compound

WTP

Willing-To-Pay Survey

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2012. Approaches for Ecosystem Services Valuation for the Gulf of Mexico After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13141.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms." National Research Council. 2012. Approaches for Ecosystem Services Valuation for the Gulf of Mexico After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13141.
×
Page 150
Approaches for Ecosystem Services Valuation for the Gulf of Mexico After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Interim Report Get This Book
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On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon platform drilling the Macondo well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (DWH) exploded, killing 11 workers and injuring another 17. The DWH oil spill resulted in nearly 5 million barrels (approximately 200 million gallons) of crude oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The full impacts of the spill on the GoM and the people who live and work there are unknown but expected to be considerable, and will be expressed over years to decades. In the short term, up to 80,000 square miles of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) were closed to fishing, resulting in loss of food, jobs and recreation.

The DWH oil spill immediately triggered a process under the U.S. Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA) to determine the extent and severity of the "injury" (defined as an observable or measurable adverse change in a natural resource or impairment of a natural resource service) to the public trust, known as the Natural Resources Damage Assessment (NRDA). The assessment, undertaken by the trustees (designated technical experts who act on behalf of the public and who are tasked with assessing the nature and extent of site-related contamination and impacts), requires: (1) quantifying the extent of damage; (2) developing, implementing, and monitoring restoration plans; and (3) seeking compensation for the costs of assessment and restoration from those deemed responsible for the injury.

This interim report provides options for expanding the current effort to include the analysis of ecosystem services to help address the unprecedented scale of this spill in U.S. waters and the challenges it presents to those charged with undertaking the damage assessment.

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