National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×

Appendix B

Steering Committee Bios

Coenraad F.M. Hendriksen, DVM, PhD, Chair, is Head of the Netherlands Centre for Alternatives to Animal Use, Chair of the Alternatives to Animal Use at the Veterinary Faculty of Utrecht University, and Senior Scientist at the Laboratory for the Quality Control of Biologicals, Central Animal Laboratories (RIVM). His expertise is in animal welfare concerns and lab animal issues in Europe. His research activities are focused on the development and validation of methods to replace, reduce, and/or refine the use of laboratory animals, especially in the field of the production and quality control of immunobiologicals. He is coeditor of several books and congress proceedings. At the time of the workshop he was a member of the Central Committee on Animal Experimentation (CCD) in the Netherlands, chair of the ECVAM Steering Group on Biologicals, and a member of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR) Council (2002–2008). He also served on the steering committee for the 2003 ILAR International Workshop on Science-Based Guidelines for Laboratory Animal Care.

Stephen W. Barthold (IOM), DVM, is Distinguished Professor of Veterinary and Medical Pathology at the University of California, Davis, and Director of the UC Davis Center for Comparative Medicine. His professional specialty is infectious diseases of laboratory rodents and biology of the laboratory mouse, with a primary focus on pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis for the last 25 years. Dr. Barthold was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2001 and has received a number of career awards. He has served on numerous national scientific advisory and review committees and published over 300 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and books. Dr. Barthold was a member of the steering committee for the 2003 ILAR workshop and a member (2002–2005) and then Chair (2005–2011) of the ILAR Council.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×

Kathryn A. Bayne, MS, PhD, DVM, DACLAM, CAAB, is Global Director for the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International (AAALAC International). In this role she directs the accreditation program worldwide and travels extensively to advance AAALAC’s accreditation program and laboratory animal welfare. Prior to this position she worked at the National Institutes of Health leading a research program on nonhuman primate psychological well-being and environmental enrichment programs for primates, dogs, cats, and swine. She has published over 40 articles on the subject and has also published extensively on accreditation of laboratory animal care and use programs. Dr. Bayne is a charter member and part of the Executive Team of the International Association of Colleges of Laboratory Animal Medicine (IACLAM). She has been a member of the ILAR Council since 2006 and also served on the NRC committees that prepared reports on the Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates, Occupational Health and Safety in the Care of Nonhuman Primates, and Guidelines for the Care and Use of Mammals in Neuroscience and Behavioral Research.

Jeffrey Everitt, DVM, is Director of Comparative Medicine and Investigator Support at GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Research & Development in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Dr. Everitt spent 17 years on the senior scientific staff of the CIIT Centers for Health Research in Research Triangle Park before joining GSK’s global Laboratory Animal Sciences department. He is also an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill and at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He served on the ILAR Council (2004–2010) and on the Board of Directors of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, as well as a Fellow of the International Academy of Toxicological Pathology.

James G. Fox (IOM), DVM, is Director of the Division of Comparative Medicine and a professor in the Department of Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as an Adjunct Professor at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. He is a Diplomate and past president of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Professor Fox is the author of over 525 articles, 80 chapters, and 4 patents and has edited and authored 13 texts in the field of in vivo model development and comparative medicine. He has given over 250 invited lectures, consults nationally and internationally with government, academia, and industry, and has served on several journal editorial boards. He has been the principal investigator of an NIH postdoctoral training

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×

grant for veterinarians for the past 23 years and has trained 50 veterinarians for careers in biomedical research. He also has an NIH training grant for veterinary students and has introduced over 100 veterinary students to careers in biomedical research. He is a past member of the NIH/NCRR Scientific Advisory Council and of the ILAR Council (2005–2011).

Joseph W. Kemnitz, PhD, is Director of Translational Technologies and Resources at the Institute of Clinical and Translational Research and professor in the Department of Cellular and Regenerative Biology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Until recently he was based at the National Primate Research Center and served as its director from 1996 to 2010. Prior to that he was a member and chair of the IACUC for the Graduate School. His research has focused on nutrition and metabolism in the contexts of reproductive physiology and aging, primarily using rhesus macaques. He was a member of the ILAR Council from 2005 to 2011.

Hilton J. Klein, VMD, MS, is former Senior Director for Comparative Medicine at Merck Research Laboratories. He was also an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Laboratory Animal Resources at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests are in laboratory animal science, particularly in the field of laboratory animal infectious disease and surgical production of animal models. He served as a consultant to the Pan American Health Organization as Merck’s representative on nonhuman primate conservation. He was a member of the steering committee of the 2003 workshop and of the ILAR Council (1998–2005).

Judy A. MacArthur Clark, CBE, BVMS, DVMS, DLAS, DipECLAM, DACLAM, FSB, FRAgS, is Chief Inspector in the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate of the Home Office in London, United Kingdom. From 2005 to 2007 she was Vice President of Worldwide Comparative Medicine at Pfizer in Groton, Connecticut, and before that (1992–2005) served as Director of Marketing and Sales at BioZone Ltd., which she cofounded. For over 20 years she has consulted on ethical policy development and improving public understanding of science. She is a member and former President of the UK Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons and has chaired or served as a member of many high-level national and international advisory committees on topics such as xenotransplantation, farm animal welfare, research funding priorities, and bioethics. She actively works on research regulation and policy development in the United Kingdom, Europe, and the United States. She is a member of the ILAR Council (2006–2012).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×
Page 258
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×
Page 259
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Steering Committee Bios." National Research Council. 2011. Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13175.
×
Page 260
Next: Appendix C: Workshop Speakers »
Animal Research in a Global Environment: Meeting the Challenges: Proceedings of the November 2008 International Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $45.00 Buy Ebook | $35.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Animal research will play an essential role in efforts to meet increasing demands for global health care. Yet the animal research community faces the challenge of overcoming negative impressions that industry and academia engage in international collaborations in order to conduct work in parts of the world where animal welfare standards are less stringent. Thus, the importance of ensuring the international harmonization of the principles and standards of animal care and use cannot be overstated. A number of national and international groups are actively working toward this goal.

The Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (ILAR), a program unit of the US National Research Council, is committed to promoting both the welfare of animals used in research and the quality of the resulting science. In 2008, to follow up on the 2003 event, ILAR convened a workshop which brought together 200 participants from 17 countries. Their mission was to identify and promote better understanding of important challenges in the conduct of animal research across country boundaries. These challenges include: the sourcing of animals; the quality of veterinary care; competent staff; the provision of a suitable environment (including nutritious food and potable water) for animals; and ongoing oversight of the animal program; among others.

Animal Research in a Global Environment summarizes the proceedings of the 2008 workshop. The impact of this 2008 workshop has extended beyond the oral presentations conveyed in these proceedings. It has been a vital bridge for diverse colleagues and organizations around the world to advance initiatives designed to fill gaps in standards, professional qualifications, and coordination of animal use.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!