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Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary (2015)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
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Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Karen Bouffard has been a reporter at the Detroit News since 2002, where she has covered a variety of topics, from education and human services to state politics and her current beat, health. She previously worked as a stringer for Time magazine and as a freelance writer for various publications, including Michigan Medicine magazine. She has won awards for stories about grandparents raising grandchildren and reported on the murder of Ricky Holland, a Michigan foster child. She was also part of a team that won an Associated Press first-place award for breaking news coverage of labor protests over Michigan’s right-to-work law. As a 2013 National Health Journalism Fellow at the University of Southern California Annenberg School of Journalism, she produced a multimedia project, Surviving Through Age 18 in Detroit, which documented the city’s high infant mortality and youth homicide rates, spurring action by city officials. She is a graduate of Michigan State University.

Ceci Connolly is the managing director of the Health Research Institute at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), LLC, a research organization dedicated to objective analysis on the issues, policies, and trends important to health organizations and policy makers. Ms. Connolly is a veteran journalist, author, and commentator who spent 25 years in the news business, reporting on national politics, health care, Latin America, and natural disasters such as Hurricane Katrina. As the national health correspondent for The Washington Post, she chronicled the enactment of the Affordable Care Act and was co-author of Landmark: The Inside Story of America’s New Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
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Care Law and What It Means for Us All. During her years in journalism, she reported on six U.S. presidential campaigns and was a major contributor to the book Deadlock: The Inside Story of America’s Closest Election. Ms. Connolly spent more than 2 years based in Mexico City, traveling extensively throughout Latin America. She produced a daily blog on Mexico’s 2006 presidential race as well as a multimedia project on HIV/AIDS along the U.S.–Mexico border. Ms. Connolly is a board member for the nonprofit Whitman Walker Health and is the first non-physician to receive the Mayo Clinic’s prestigious Plummer Society Award for promoting a deeper understanding of science and medicine. She also serves on the national advisory board of the Center for Sustainable Health Spending and was the recipient of a fellowship at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. She has appeared on PBS’s Washington Week, CBS’s The Early Show, NPR’s Diane Rehm Show, and several news programs on MSNBC and the Fox News Channel. Ms. Connolly has spoken at the prestigious National Press Club, the Chautauqua Institution, the Cleveland Clinic, numerous universities, and health care conferences. Prior to joining PwC, she was a senior adviser at the McKinsey Center for Health Reform. In her role at the Health Research Institute, Ms. Connolly oversees a team of independent analysts and writers who track major developments across the healthcare spectrum.

Kate Langrall Folb, M.Ed., is a program director for Hollywood, Health & Society (HH&S), a program of the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication, Norman Lear Center, and a veteran for more than 20 years in the entertainment education field. After an early career in television and music production and management at Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert, Shep Gordon’s Alive Enterprises, and Borman Entertainment, Ms. Folb joined the Scott Newman Foundation as director of special projects. There, she worked with top television shows and films on portrayals of alcohol and other substance abuse, developed a media literacy program for middle and high school students, and produced the foundation’s annual public service announcements. Later, she spent nearly 10 years as director of The Media Project, a partnership of Advocates for Youth and the Kaiser Family Foundation, which addressed portrayals of adolescent reproductive health in the media, working with dozens of prime-time and daytime television shows on storylines featuring HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, teen pregnancy prevention, condom use, and sex education, among other topics. She also produced the annual SHINE Awards for sexual health in entertainment and developed a cutting-edge media campaign for Viacom to normalize condom use and encourage healthy relationships. From 2001 to 2012 Ms. Folb led Nightingale Entertainment, an independent consulting firm working

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on the multi-year Cover the Uninsured Week and Covering Kids and Families campaigns, and with Planned Parenthood Federation of America on Birth Control Matters and I Stand with Planned Parenthood, garnering celebrity involvement, producing public service announcements, and coordinating national media events. She joined HH&S in July 2012 as senior program manager and became director in fall 2013. Ms. Folb speaks fluent Spanish and holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver and a master’s degree in education from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Marthe Gold, M.D., M.P.H., is a visiting scholar at the New York Academy of Medicine and the Arthur C. Logan Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine at the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at City College, New York. A graduate of the Tufts University School of Medicine and the Columbia School of Public Health, she received her clinical training in family medicine. Dr. Gold has been a primary care provider in urban and rural underserved settings. She served as a senior policy adviser in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in the Department of Health and Human Services from 1990 to 1996, where her focus was on the financing of clinical preventive services, the economics and outcomes of public health programs, and health care reform. Dr. Gold directed the work of the Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, an expert panel whose report remains an influential guide to cost-effectiveness methodology for academic and policy uses. Her current academic work focuses on patient, public, and decision maker views on using economic and comparative effectiveness information to inform health policy. A member of the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Gold served as chair of its Committee on Public Health Strategies to Improve Health, which was convened in 2009 and whose three reports on measurement, law and policy, and funding were released between 2010 and 2012.

Sarah Gollust, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Her broad research interests lie at the intersection of communication and health policy, and she is particularly interested in understanding the media’s role in influencing the public’s opinions and perceptions of public health issues. Her recent published research has examined the media framing of and public opinion toward health inequalities, type 2 diabetes, childhood obesity, and the human papillomavirus vaccine. She has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles on these topics, and her work has been funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and the National Institutes of Health. From 2008 to 2010 she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Soci-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

ety Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Gollust received her Ph.D. in health services organization and policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert C. Hornik, Ph.D., is the Wilbur Schramm Professor of Communication and Health Policy at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). He co-directs Penn’s Tobacco Center for Regulatory Science, which is funded by the Federal Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute. From 2003 to 2014, he directed Penn’s National Cancer Institute–funded center of excellence in cancer communication research. Previously he led the evaluation of more than 20 public health communication campaigns, including those focused on child survival, HIV prevention, and tobacco use throughout the world as well as the evaluation of the U.S. National Youth Antidrug Media Campaign. He is the author of Development Communication, he edited Public Health Communication: Evidence for Behavior Change and co-edited Prediction and Change of Health Behavior, and he is the author of more than 125 refereed articles and papers. He has served on four Institute of Medicine committees, is a fellow of the International Communication Association, and received the Derryberry Award from the American Public Health Association and the Lindback award for distinguished teaching at Penn.

David Kindig, M.D., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Population Health Sciences and Emeritus Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He currently is co-chair of the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Population Health Improvement, and he co-directs the Wisconsin site of the Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars Program. He was an initial co–principal investigator on the Robert Wood Johnson MATCH grant under which the County Health Rankings were developed, and he was the founder of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Roadmaps to HealthPrize. From 2011 to 2103 he was editor of the Improving Population Health blog. He received a B.A. from Carleton College in 1962 and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 1968. He completed residency training in social pediatrics at Montefiore Hospital in 1971. Dr. Kindig served as a professor of preventive medicine/population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin from 1980 to 2003. He was vice chancellor for health sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1980 to 1985, director of Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center from 1976 to 1980, deputy director of the Bureau of Health Manpower at the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare from 1974 to 1976, and the first medical director of the National Health Services Corps from 1971 to 1973. He was the national president of the Student American Med-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

ical Association in 1967–1968. He served as chair of the federal Council of Graduate Medical Education (1995–1997), president of the Association for Health Services Research (1997–1998), a Prospective Payment Assessment Commission commissioner (1991–1994), and as senior advisor to Donna Shalala, Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993–1995). In 1996 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of Chicago School of Medicine in 2003. He chaired the IOM’s Committee on Health Literacy in 2002–2004, chaired Wisconsin Governor Doyle’s Healthy Wisconsin Task-force in 2006, and received the 2007 Wisconsin Public Health Association’s Distinguished Service to Public Health Award.

Michelle Larkin, J.D., M.S., R.N., is an assistant vice president and deputy director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF’s) health group, where she helps to shape the foundation’s strategies and policies. She views her role as one of “contributing to the foundation’s intellectual and organizational development and managing program operations to ensure that we meet RWJF’s goals of reversing the childhood obesity epidemic, driving fundamental improvements in the nation’s public health system, and addressing the needs of the country’s most vulnerable populations.” Ms. Larkin also co-leads the foundation’s major initiative on public health law. In this capacity, she strives to establish effective public health laws, regulations, and policies; to enhance the public health law infrastructure to support practitioners, advocates, and their legal counsels in improving health; and to promote the use of law in fields that affect health. In supporting the foundation’s commitment to tackling some of the nation’s toughest health and health care problems through evidence and policy, Ms. Larkin seeks to fulfill the promise she made to herself early in her career: “to create a positive impact on the lives of many and make it easier for people to live healthier lives.” Previously, Ms. Larkin directed the foundation’s public health team in its work to improve federal, state, and local public health systems; to build the necessary evidence for effective public health practice and policy; and to advocate for the use of law and policy to improve health. From 2003 through 2006, she co-led the foundation’s tobacco team, promoting increased tobacco excise taxes, state and local smoke-free air laws, and funding for tobacco prevention and treatment. She has also worked on the foundation’s key areas of nursing, leadership development, and end-of-life care. Before joining the foundation, Ms. Larkin worked as a health policy analyst at the Office on Smoking and Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Washington, DC, developing and analyzing policy proposals related to state, national and international tobacco prevention and control and contributing to the development of Healthy People 2010. She served as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

a Presidential Management Fellow, working as a policy analyst at CDC and as a legislative fellow for the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee. Previously, she was an oncology nurse at the University of Maryland Medical System in Baltimore, Maryland.

Thomas LaVeist, Ph.D., is the William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy, and Director, Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Michigan. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in health policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. LaVeist is a former fellow at the Institute of Gerontology and School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, where he participated in several studies, including a study of the differences in adjustment to aging in four societies (the United States, Japan, mainland China, and Taiwan) and the National Survey of Black Americans. Dr. LaVeist is also a former associate with the Program for Research on Black Americans at the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. As a Brookdale National Fellow, Dr. LaVeist has focused his research on further understanding the social and behavioral factors that affect the length of human life. He has also conducted studies of the social determinants of health and research on the determinants of disparities in health care access, utilization, and quality.

Michelle Levander, M.A., joined the University of Southern California (USC) in 2004 as founding director of the USC Annenberg School of Journalism’s The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship. The fellowships program has educated more than 600 journalists nationwide. It helps journalists produce game-changing reporting that has influenced policy and improved health in communities across America. Other initiatives launched under her leadership include ReportingonHealth.org, an online community of journalists, bloggers, and policy thinkers; and the Reporting on Health Collaborative, which brings together health journalists on collaborative projects. She joined with Pedro Rojas, former executive editor of La Opinión, to launch Boyle Heights Beat, a bilingual newspaper reported by youth for their immigrant neighborhood in Los Angeles. The Center’s Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism provides grants that support groundbreaking journalism on community health. A veteran editor and a writer, Ms. Levander reported in Asia, Latin America, and the United States for Time Magazine Asia, the Asian Wall Street Journal, and the San Jose Mercury News. She has received journalism awards from the Overseas Press Club of America (Best Reporting in Latin America), the Inter American Press Association, and the Society of Profes-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

sional Journalists. A former Inter American Press Association fellow, she spent 1 year in Mexico attending the prestigious El Colegio de Mexico and researching migrant culture in rural Mexico. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude from the University of California, Berkeley, and has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Kate Long is a former national award-winning reporter who now co-directs a statewide healthy lifestyle coalition in West Virginia. Her 2012–2013 Charleston Gazette series, “The Shape We’re In,” spotlighted West Virginia’s chronic disease epidemic and featured communities and people who are fighting it. After finishing the series, the West Virginia native accepted an invitation to create a West Virginia–based “how-to” website for West Virginians who want to create healthier communities. The website, based with the West Virginia Healthy Kids and Families Coalition, grew into the year-old Try This program, which now includes the website (trythiswv.com), an annual conference, and an extensive minigrant program. It is overseen by a coalition of 20 statewide groups and organizations. Ms. Long’s newspaper stories, public radio reporting, fiction, and songwriting have won national awards.

Sanne Magnan, M.D., Ph.D., is the president and chief executive officer of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI) in Minnesota. Dr. Magnan was reappointed to this position in January 2011 after serving for 3 years as the Minnesota commissioner of health. She had previously served as the president of ICSI in 2006 and 2007. As commissioner of health, she was responsible for the implementation of significant components of Minnesota’s 2008 health reform legislation. Under her leadership, Minnesota developed the Statewide Health Improvement Program to address tobacco and obesity, a standardized quality reporting system and quality incentive system, the “baskets of care” payment system, the certification of primary care clinics as health care homes, and a system for provider peer grouping (ranking providers with a composite measure of total quality and total cost). She also supported more consumer engagement in health care and furthered e-health usage. During her earlier tenure at ICSI, she helped expand ICSI’s focus beyond guideline development and quality improvement activities to include strategic initiatives designed to enhance patient-centered and value-driven health care. Two unique programs in the country—ICSI’s DIAMOND program for depression and the statewide initiative to ensure the appropriate use of high-technology diagnostic imaging scans—are outcomes of that focus. Dr. Magnan has also served as a staff physician at the Tuberculosis Clinic at St. Paul–Ramsey County Department of Public Health and a clinical assistant professor of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

medicine at the University of Minnesota. She previously served as vice president and medical director of consumer health at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, lead physician at Lino Lakes Correctional Facility, and a staff physician at various other clinics. She has served on several boards, including Minnesota Community Measurement. Commissioner Magnan was named 1 of the 100 Influential Health Care Leaders by Minnesota Physician in 2004. Dr. Magnan holds an M.D. and a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from the University of Minnesota. She earned her bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from the University of North Carolina.

Michael Manganiello, M.P.A., is a born advocate and a believer in the power of patient groups to affect major shifts in health policy. He founded HCM with Kristin Conklin and Terrell Halaska as a firm that not only can access major stakeholders in the health care community but can bring them together and find common ground to advance positive change. Mr. Manganiello is driven by this philosophy in his management of the firm’s health policy practice, where he leads the firm’s work for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, Novo Nordisk, Faster Cures, and the New York Stem Cell Foundation. Mr. Manganiello brings to HCM an impressive track record of building effective coalitions within the health care community. He chaired the Paralysis Task Force, which collaborated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Hope Network to connect more than 50,000 advocates across the country. He is also a founding member, president emeritus, and board member of the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research (CAMR), which unites more than 100 diverse organizations in support of groundbreaking medical research. He and CAMR were instrumental in Congress’s passage of the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act and the Obama administration’s decision to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. Mr. Manganiello has served on several boards and advisory panels, including the National Institutes of Health Director’s Council of Public Representatives, the National Association for Biomedical Research, the Prevent Cancer Foundation, and the National Symposium on Health Care Reform. He is passionate about his role as a board member of Whitman Walker Health, the largest provider of HIV/AIDS health services in Washington, DC, and he has a strong focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender health issues. Whitman Walker, a federally qualified health center, is the new and better entry point for many Americans to receive their health care. It is at the center of the innovative changes that the Affordable Care Act exemplifies.

Dana March, Ph.D., is a psychiatric epidemiologist with graduate training in 20th-century American history. She weaves together her training in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

history and epidemiology to address her two primary research interests: the conceptualization and measurement of social context as it pertains to psychosis, cognition, and related neurodevelopmental outcomes across the life course; and the historical study of epidemiologic methods and understanding of disease. A unifying theme in Dr. March’s work is social inequalities. She is currently developing a body of epidemiologic work regarding social context that examines how a particular place at a given moment in history can be a reservoir of risk or resilience with respect to cognition and psychosis, depending on the social group and the timing of exposure during the life course. In her historical work, Dr. March is currently examining the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped quantitative methods for characterizing infectious disease transmission dynamics, specifically, how the valuation—or devaluation—of indigenous populations in the British colonies ultimately shaped the development of the mathematics that would enable the characterization of the transmission dynamics of malaria.

Jeff Niederdeppe, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at Cornell University. His research examines the mechanisms and effects of mass media campaigns, strategic health messages, and news coverage in shaping health behavior, health disparities, and social policy. He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed articles in communication, public health, health policy, and medicine journals, and his work has been funded in recent years by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He serves on the editorial boards for five communication journals.

Rachel Poulain, M.P.H., is an associate producer and public engagement director for The Raising of America: Linking Early Childhood to the Future of Our Nation, a forthcoming documentary and public engagement campaign, produced by California Newsreel, that explores how early childhood health and development is linked to a more prosperous and equitable society. She was an associate producer and director of outreach for the award-winning documentary series Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? also produced by California Newsreel. Ms. Poulain teaches documentary for health and social justice, an innovative trans-disciplinary course offered by the Health Equity Institute and the cinema department at San Francisco State University. Health education students partner with cinema students to work with a community organizations to create short films for social change. Prior to this, Ms. Poulain was a communications associate at the California School Health Centers Association, where she worked to engage and foster advocates for school-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×

based health centers. She began her career in the health communications field as a research associate and communications production manager at PolicyLink, a national research and action institute advancing economic and social equity. Ms. Poulain holds a master of public health degree from San Francisco State University.

Carlos Roig is executive vice president at Home Front, where he leads the Media and Content Strategy Division with a strong emphasis on creative storytelling, strategic distribution, and engagement on multiple platforms. He built and established the agency’s first digital media strategy team before merging the digital, broadcast, and print units into a single, integrated division. In addition to his work with Home Front, Mr. Roig is a recipient of the Teaching Excellence and Service Award for his instruction in Georgetown University’s graduate journalism program. His courses have spanned digital media strategy, entrepreneurial journalism, and project management for news organizations. Prior to joining Home Front, Mr. Roig led the site-wide development of niche-targeted online communities at USAToday.com and directed USA Today’s full digital coverage of the 2008 election cycle.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
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The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Population Health Improvement brings together individuals and organizations that represent different sectors in a dialogue about what is needed to improve population health. On September 22, 2014, the roundtable held a workshop to discuss some of the science of health communication, audiences, and messaging, and to explore what it will take to generate widespread awareness, acceptance, and action to improve health, including through the entertainment media, the news media, and social media. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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