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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
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Appendix A

References

Barry, C. L., V. L. Brescoll, and S. E. Gollust. 2013. Framing childhood obesity: How individualizing the problem affects public support for prevention. Political Psychology 34(3):327–349.

Bergan, D. E. 2012. Partisan stereotypes and policy attitudes. Journal of Communication 62(2):1102–1120.

Bouffard, K. 2014. Surviving through age 18 in Detroit. A Detroit News special report. The Detroit News January 30. http://www.detroitnews.com/article/99999999/METRO01/140127002&template=THEME&theme=SURVIVING-T0-18 (accessed January 29, 2015).

Christenson, W., A. Dawson Taggart, S. Messner-Zidell, M. Kiernan, J. Cusick, and R. Day. 2012. Still too fat to fight. Washington, DC: Mission: Readiness. http://missionreadiness.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/Still-Too-Fat-To-Fight-Report.pdf (accessed February 16, 2015).

Gollust, S. E., and J. N. Cappella. 2014. Understanding public resistance to messages about health disparities. Journal of Health Communication 19(4):493–510.

Gollust, S. E., and P. M. Lantz. 2009. Communicating population health: Print news media coverage of type 2 diabetes. Social Science and Medicine 69(7):1091–1098.

Gollust, S. E., P. M. Lantz, and P. A. Ubel. 2009. The polarizing effect of news media messages about the social determinants of health. American Journal of Public Health 99(12):2160–2167. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2775784 (accessed January 6, 2014).

Gollust, S. E., J. Niederdeppe, and C. L. Barry. 2013. Framing the consequences of childhood obesity to increase public support for obesity prevention policy. American Journal of Public Health 103(11):e96–e102.

Gollust, S. E., H. A. Kite, S. J. Benning, R. A. Callanan, S. R. Weisman and M. S. Nanney. 2014. Use of research evidence in state policymaking for childhood obesity prevention in Minnesota. American Journal of Public Health 104(10):1894–1900.

Harwood, E. M., J. C. Witson, D. P. Fan, and A. C. Wagenaar. 2005. Media advocacy and underage drinking policies: A study of Louisiana news media from 1994 through 2003. Health Promotion Practice 6:246–257.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
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IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2013. Educating the student body: Taking physical activity and physical education to school. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2014. Supporting a movement for health and health equity: Lessons from social movements: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Kennedy, M. G., A. O’Leary, V. Beck, W. E. Pollard, and P. Simpson. 2004. Increases in calls to the CDC national STD and AIDS hotline following AIDS-related episodes in a soap opera. Journal of Communication 54(2):287–301.

Kindig, D., and G. Stoddart. 2003. What is population health? American Journal of Public Health 93(3):380–383.

Lundell, H., J. Niederdeppe, and C. Clarke. 2013. Public views about health causation, attributions of responsibility, and inequality. Journal of Health Communication 18(9):1116–1130.

Lynch, J., and S. Gollust. 2010. Playing fair: Fairness beliefs and health policy preferences in the United States. Journal of Health Policy, Politics and Law 35(6):849–887.

Morgan, S. E., L. Movius, and M. J. Cody. 2009. The power of narratives: The effect of entertainment television organ donation storylines on the attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of donors and nondonors. Journal of Communication 59(1):135–151.

Movius, L., M. Cody, G. Huang, M. Berkowitz, and S. Morgan. 2007. Motivating television viewers to become organ donors. Cases in Public Health Communication and Marketing. http://publichealth.gwu.edu/departments/pch/phcm/casesjournal/volume1/peer-reviewed/cases_1_08.pdf (accessed March 3, 2015).

Niederdeppe, J., M. A. Shapiro, H. K. Kim, D. Bartolo and N. Porticella. 2014a. Narrative persuasion, causality, complex integration, and support for obesity policy. Health Communication 29(5):431–444.

Niederdeppe, J., S. Gollust, and C. L. Barry. 2014b. Inoculation in competitive framing: Examining message effects on policy preferences. Public Opinion Quarterly 78(3):634–655.

Niederdeppe, J., S. Roh, and C. Dreisbach. 2015. How narrative focus and a statistical map interact to shape health policy support among state legislators. Health Communication.

Rigby, E., J. Soss, B. C. Booske, A. M. K. Rohan, and S. A. Robert. 2009. Public responses to health disparities: How group cues influence support for government intervention. Social Science Quarterly 90(5):1321–1340.

Robert, S. A., and B. C. Booske. 2011. U.S. opinions on health determinants and social policy as health policy. American Journal of Public Health 101(9):1655–1663. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3154244 (accessed January 5, 2015).

Wallington, S. F., K. D. Blake, K. Taylor–Clark, and K. Viswanath. 2010. Challenges in covering health disparities in local news media: An exploratory analysis assessing views of journalists. Journal of Community Health 35(5):487–494.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
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Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Communicating to Advance the Public's Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21694.
×
Page 68
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The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Population Health Improvement brings together individuals and organizations that represent different sectors in a dialogue about what is needed to improve population health. On September 22, 2014, the roundtable held a workshop to discuss some of the science of health communication, audiences, and messaging, and to explore what it will take to generate widespread awareness, acceptance, and action to improve health, including through the entertainment media, the news media, and social media. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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