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Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

Gretchen Alkema, Ph.D., M.S.W., serves as vice president of policy and communications for The SCAN Foundation. Prior to joining the foundation, she was the 2008–2009 John Heinz/Health and Aging Policy Fellow and an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, serving in the office of Senator Blanche L. Lincoln (D-Ark.). Dr. Alkema advised Senator Lincoln on aging, health, mental health, and long-term care policy during the 2009 health care reform debate. Dr. Alkema holds a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California’s Davis School of Gerontology and was awarded The John A. Hartford Doctoral Fellow in Geriatric Social Work and AARP Scholars Program Award. She completed postdoctoral training at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence and was a research associate for the California Fall Prevention Center of Excellence. Her academic research focused on evaluating innovative models of chronic care management and translating effective models into practice. Dr. Alkema also earned a master’s degree in social work with a specialist-in-aging certificate from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. As a licensed clinical social worker, she practiced in government and nonprofit settings including community mental health, care management, adult day health care, residential care, and post-acute rehabilitation.

David Baquis is an accessibility specialist with the United States Access Board (Access Board). He delivers presentations, writes technical assis-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

tance materials, and responds to public inquiries on Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and Section 255 of the Telecommunications Act. He is currently involved with updating the Access Board’s rule on information and communication technology accessibility. His background blends experience in health care, consumer education, disability issues, technology, and public policy.

Susan Chapman, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N., FAAN, is a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, and a member of the faculty at the Center for Health Professions and the Institute for Health Policy Studies. She is a co-director of the masters and doctoral programs in health policy at the School of Nursing. Her scholarly work focuses on health workforce research, health policy analysis, and program evaluation. Dr. Chapman’s workforce research focuses on transforming models of primary care to address health reform, education and new roles for allied health workers, and meeting population demands for increased care in home- and community-based services. She served on a committee for the Institute of Medicine (IOM) study on the health care workforce for an aging U.S. population and chaired the planning committee for an IOM workshop on the allied health workforce. Dr. Chapman received her B.S. from the University of Iowa, her M.S. from Boston College, her M.P.H. from Boston University, and her Ph.D. in health services and policy analysis from the University of California, Berkeley.

Henry Claypool, having sustained a spinal cord injury in a snow skiing accident in college, has spent his career advocating for the rights and needs of people living with disabilities. Most recently, he served as the executive vice president of the American Association of People with Disabilities. He was also the senior advisor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, during which time he was a principal architect of the administration’s efforts to expand access to community living services, which culminated in the creation of the Administration for Community Living. He served as a commissioner on the 2013 National Commission on Long-Term Care.

Loren Colman, NHA, has been the assistant commissioner of continuing care for the Minnesota Department of Human Services since early 2003. In that position, he has directed the efforts of many programs that serve the people of Minnesota. These include aging and adult services, disability services, mental health, chemical health, deaf and hard-of-hearing services, state-operated services, and nursing facilities. He has provided focus and leadership for Transform 2010, designed to prepare Minnesota

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

for the age wave of retiring baby boomers. He has provided additional focus on consumer-directed initiatives that will allow Minnesotans to have more decision-making options on what services they need. His other interests have included employment and housing options for people with disabilities. He has more than 25 years of operations experience in directing and managing long-term care facilities.

Adam Darkins, M.D., M.P.H., is a world leader in using information and telecommunication technologies to transform health care organizations to be more efficient and effective and to reduce the costs of care. He is recognized for this from success working in clinical process reengineering, systems redesign, and project management in the United States and United Kingdom. In late 2014 he transitioned to Medtronic, Inc., from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, having created national telehealth platforms providing mission-critical enterprise programs that expanded access to health care, delivering more than 2 million episodes of care to 720,000 patients annually. A telehealth/connected health platform he pioneered reduces hospital admissions by 19 percent and associated bed days of care by 25 percent, with very high levels of patient satisfaction. Dr. Darkins is supporting the ongoing patient-centric development of Medtronic’s existing technologies and is helping create new products and services that will transform the patient care experience. He is based in Washington, DC, and has also worked as a medical director in the UK National Health Service; on policy development at the King’s Fund in London, England; as a neurosurgeon in London; and he researched cognitive and motor function changes associated with Parkinson’s disease at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has a master’s degree in public health medicine from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Richard G. Frank, Ph.D., is the assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In this position, Dr. Frank advises the secretary of health and human services on the development of health, disability, human services, data, and science policy and provides advice and analysis on economic policy. Dr. Frank is on leave from his position as the Margaret T. Morris Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School, a position he has held since 1999. From 2009 to 2011 he served as the deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation, directing the Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy. His research is focused on the economics of mental health and substance abuse care, long-term care financing policy, and disability policy. Until his appointment, Dr. Frank was also a research associate with the National Bureau

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

of Economic Research and served as an editor for the Journal of Health Economics. From 1994 to 1999, Dr. Frank was a professor of health economics in the Department of Health Policy at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Frank previously held faculty positions at Johns Hopkins University from 1984 to 1994 and at the University of Pittsburgh from 1980 to 1984. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Botswana from 1975 to 1976. He is the 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from the Mental Health Association of Maryland. Dr. Frank was awarded the Georgescu-Roegen prize from the Southern Economic Association, the Carl A. Taube Award from the American Public Health Association, and the Emily Mumford Medal from Columbia University’s Department of Psychiatry. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1997. He is coauthor with Sherry Glied of the book Better but Not Well (Johns Hopkins Press). Dr. Frank received a B.A. in economics from Bard College and a Ph.D. in economics from Boston University.

Terry T. Fulmer, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is the president of The John A. Hartford Foundation. Previously, she was a professor and dean of the Bouve College of Health Sciences and a professor of public policy and urban affairs in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities at Northeastern University. She received her bachelor’s degree from Skidmore College, her master’s and doctoral degrees from Boston College, and her geriatric nurse practitioner post-master’s certificate from New York University (NYU). She is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and currently serves as vice chair of the New York Academy of Medicine. She is an attending nurse and senior nurse in the Munn Center for Nursing Research at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Fulmer is nationally and internationally recognized as a leading expert in geriatrics and is best known for her research on the topic of elder abuse and neglect, which has been funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute for Nursing Research. She most recently served as the Erline Perkins McGriff Professor of Nursing and founding dean of the New York University College of Nursing. She has held faculty appointments at Boston College, Columbia University, Yale University, and the Harvard Division on Aging. She has served as a visiting professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and Case Western University. Dr. Fulmer is dedicated to the advancement of interprofessional health science education and progress in interdisciplinary practice and research. Her clinical appointments have included the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the NYU-Langone Medical Center. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, The Gerontological Society of America, and the New York Academy of Medicine. She completed a Brookdale National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

Fellowship and is a distinguished practitioner of the National Academies of Practice.

Constance Garner, M.S., R.N., focuses her practice as the policy director and practice leader in the Government Strategies Practice Group, and the executive director for Advance CLASS, Inc. Her areas of expertise include health care, disability, mental health and substance use disorders, long-term care, and education. Prior to rejoining Foley Hoag she was the executive vice president for policy at United Cerebral Palsy, a position she maintains through her current consulting practice. For 17 years, Ms. Garner served as the policy director for disability and special populations to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, and she served as the primary consultant to the Democratic caucus on these issues. She worked with Sen. Christopher Dodd, Sen. Tom Harkin, and primarily with the late Chairman Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. She was the lead Democratic Committee architect for the CLASS Act, the major long-term care legislation that was part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; enactment of the landmark Mental Health Parity Act 2008; the 2006 and 2009 reauthorizations of the $2 billion Ryan White CARE Act; the Family Opportunity Act of 2006; the 2003 (most current) reauthorization of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; and the 1999 Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. Ms. Garner also served in the U.S. Department of Education as Director of the Federal Interagency Coordinating Council for Children with Disabilities, and as the Secretary of Education’s principal liaison to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on interagency health care matters, including early intervention and prevention initiatives across the public health domain. She has practiced as both a hospital and a community public health clinical nurse specialist and continues to work as a hospital-based nurse practitioner in the Washington, DC, area. She earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania and George Mason University, respectively. She also earned an educational specialist degree in special education and is certified as a pediatric and neonatal nurse practitioner.

Kathy Greenlee, J.D., serves in the dual roles of administrator of the Administration for Community Living (ACL) and assistant secretary for aging at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, for which she was appointed by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate in June 2009. ACL was created in 2012, bringing together the federal government’s work on behalf of older adults and people with disabilities. From the beginning, ACL was based on a commitment to one fundamental principle—that people with disabilities and older adults should be able

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

to live independently and participate fully in their communities. ACL works with states, tribes, community providers, researchers, universities, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and families to achieve that vision. ACL’s programs work collaboratively to enhance access to health care and long-term services and supports, while also promoting inclusive community living policies, such as livable communities and competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities. Assistant Secretary Greenlee believes that people with functional support needs should have the opportunity to live independently in homes of their choosing, receiving appropriate services and supports. She is committed to building the capacity of the national aging and disability networks to better meet that need. She served as secretary of aging in Kansas and, before that, as the Kansas State long-term care ombudsman. She also served as the general counsel of the Kansas Insurance Department and served as chief of staff and chief of operations for then-Governor Kathleen Sebelius. She is a graduate of the University of Kansas with a bachelor of science degree in business administration and a Juris Doctor degree in law.

Robert Jarrin, J.D., is senior director of government affairs for Qualcomm Incorporated. He is based in Washington, DC, and represents Qualcomm on U.S. domestic regulatory matters relating to wireless health and life sciences. Jarrin’s areas of responsibility include wireless health policy, U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory oversight of converged medical devices, health care legislative affairs, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services telehealth reimbursement, and the regulation of health information technology. Externally, Jarrin has served as co-chair of the U.S. Policy Working Group for the Continua Health Alliance, leads the American Telemedicine Association Policy A-Team on Telehealth and Meaningful Use, is the U.S. chair for the European-American Business Council eHealth Policy Group, serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of Medical Automation, is a member of the mHIMSS Advisory Council, and is seated on the board of directors for Vida Senior Centers, the oldest Latino nonprofit organization in the District of Columbia. Jarrin frequently lectures on mobile health and medical device regulations for the George Washington University Health Policy Department and the Case Western Reserve University, Case School of Engineering. Prior to joining Qualcomm, Jarrin worked as a manager of strategic partnerships for Ericsson Wireless Communications, served as a law clerk in the White House Office of Counsel to President Clinton, and also served as a law clerk and subsequent consultant in the U.S. Department of Justice to Attorney General Janet Reno. Jarrin holds a bachelor of arts degree in government and politics from the University of Maryland at College Park and a Juris Doctor degree from Northeastern University School of Law.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

H. Stephen Kaye, Ph.D., is a professor at the Institute for Health & Aging and the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He serves as director and principal investigator of the Community Living Policy Center, a national research center funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research and the Administration for Community Living. Previously, he led the Center for Personal Assistance Services and was co-director of the UCSF Disability Statistics Center. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1983. His primary research interests focus on the community-based long-term services and supports needed by people with disabilities of all ages, employment issues among people with disabilities, the use of information and assistive technology, and disability measurement and data collection.

Teresa L. Lee, J.D., is the executive director of the Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation (the Alliance). She joined the Alliance in June 2011. As a graduate of Harvard University’s School of Public Health and with formal training as an attorney, Ms. Lee is a recognized professional in the fields of Medicare reimbursement and health law and policy. She brings to the Alliance a thorough understanding of the critical intersection between health policy, health care reform, and the law. As executive director, Ms. Lee hopes to support skilled home health’s critical and valuable role as the U.S. health care delivery system changes to improve both the quality and efficiency of patient-centered care. Ms. Lee has a strong background in health care policy and association management experience. Prior to her work for the Alliance, Ms. Lee served as a senior vice president at the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed) in Washington, DC. Her career at AdvaMed included her tenure as vice president and associate vice president of payment and health care delivery policy. Ms. Lee has also served as a senior counsel in the Office of the Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A lifelong resident of the Washington, DC area, Ms. Lee earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley; a master of public health degree from the Harvard University’s School of Public Health; and a law degree from The George Washington University Law School.

Shari M. Ling, M.D., is the deputy chief medical officer for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and a medical officer in the Center for Clinical Standards and Quality. Dr. Ling is a geriatrician and rheumatologist who received her medical training at Georgetown University School of Medicine and graduated as a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dr. Ling received her clinical training in internal medi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

cine and rheumatology at Georgetown University Medical Center, and completed geriatric medicine training at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining the National Institute on Aging as a clinician to study human aging and age-associated chronic diseases with attention to musculoskeletal conditions and morbidity function, which she did for 8 years, she served on faculty at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She also served as the clinical services co-director of the Andrus Older Adult Counseling Center. Dr. Ling maintains an affiliation as a part-time faculty member in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and as a volunteer faculty member of the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology at the University of Maryland and continues to see patients at the Veterans Health Administration Medical Center in Baltimore. Dr. Ling’s focus is on the achievement of meaningful health outcomes through delivery of high-quality, person-centered care, with special interests in the care of persons with dementia, multiple chronic conditions, functional limitations, and reducing health disparities.

Anne Montgomery, M.S., is a senior analyst at Altarum Institute’s Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness and a visiting scholar at the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI). At Altarum, she oversees a portfolio of work primarily aimed at helping to establish policy frameworks for the delivery of services spanning medical and long-term services and supports. From 2007 to 2013, Ms. Montgomery served as senior policy advisor for the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, where she developed hearings and policy enacted as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to upgrade quality in nursing homes; widen options for states to offer home- and community-based services; improve geriatric competence in the health care workforce; and establish standardized assessment processes, centralized access points, and improved case management protocols in programs offering health care and social support services to older adults. Ms. Montgomery has also served as a senior health policy associate with the Alliance for Health Reform in Washington, DC; as a senior analyst in public health at the U.S. Government Accountability Office; and as a legislative aide for the Ways and Means Health Subcommittee. Based in London, England as an Atlantic Fellow in Public Policy in 2001–2002, she undertook comparative policy analysis of the role of family caregivers in the development of long-term care in the United Kingdom and the United States. During the 1990s, Ms. Montgomery worked as a health and science journalist covering the National Institutes of Health and Congress. A member of NASI, Academy Health, and the American Society on Aging, Ms. Montgomery has an M.S.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

from Columbia University and a B.A. from the University of Virginia and has taken gerontology coursework at Johns Hopkins University.

Patricia (Polly) Pittman, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, and the director of the Health Resources and Services Administration Health Workforce Research Center. Professor Pittman teaches and focuses her research on health workforce policy. She has provided research support for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing and, with support from the MacArthur Foundation, has led a series of studies examining the recruitment of foreign-educated health professionals to the United States. Prior to joining the Department of Health Policy in 2010, she taught comparative health systems at the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies and served as the executive vice president of Academy-Health. Over the years, she has worked as a consultant on health systems research for the Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization’s Tropical Disease Research Program, the World Bank, Johns Hopkins University, and multiple foundations. In the early part of her career she lived in Argentina, where she worked in human rights and later as the director of social programs for the Province of Buenos Aires.

Jodi M. Sturgeon is president of the Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute (PHI). As president, she is responsible for the organization’s programmatic and strategic direction, as well as its operations. Under her leadership, PHI is promoting a strategic understanding of direct-care work as one of few growing employment opportunities for women and families in low-income communities. She has two decades of nonprofit management experience, bringing 8 years of executive experience to her role as president. Prior to her position as PHI vice president, she was the organization’s chief operating and financial officer, introducing innovations that strengthened PHI’s infrastructure and mission. She served formerly as vice president for a statewide community development financial institution, helping to strengthen housing, community facilities, jobs, and services for low-income individuals and families in New Hampshire. She currently serves as the board treasurer for PHI’s founding affiliate, the Bronx, New York-based Cooperative Home Care Associates, and serves on the board of Directors for PHI, its affiliate managed long-term care plan Independence Care System in New York, and its affiliate Home Care Associates of Philadelphia. She has a B.S. in accounting, and did graduate work at Southern New Hampshire University, with a concentration in nonprofit finance that included an advanced certificate in governmental finance.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

Fernando Torres-Gil, Ph.D., is a professor of social welfare and public policy at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), an adjunct professor of gerontology at the University of Southern California, and the director of the UCLA Center for Policy Research on Aging. He has served as an associate dean and acting dean at the UCLA School of Public Affairs and as the chair of the Social Welfare Department. His research spans topics of health and long-term care, disability, entitlement reform, and the politics of aging. In 1978 he was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to the Federal Council on Aging. He was selected as a White House Fellow and served under Joseph Califano, then Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), and continued as a special assistant to the subsequent secretary of HEW, Patricia Harris. He was appointed (with Senate confirmation) by President Bill Clinton as the first U.S. assistant secretary on aging in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In this position, Dr. Torres-Gil played a key role in promoting the importance of the issues of aging, long-term care and disability, community services for the elderly, and baby boomer preparation for retirement. He served under HHS Secretary Donna Shalala, managing the Administration on Aging in addition to serving as a member of the President’s Welfare Reform Working Group. In 2010 he received his third presidential appointment (with Senate confirmation) when President Barack Obama appointed him as vice chair of the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency that reports to the Congress and White House on matters related to disability policy. He also served as the staff director of the U.S. House Select Committee on Aging under Congressman Edward R. Roybal. At the state level, he was appointed by former Governor Gray Davis to the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on Veterans’ Homes. He is also a board member of the AARP Foundation. Dr. Torres-Gil earned his A.A. in political science at Hartnell Community College, a B.A. in political science from San Jose State University, and an M.S.W. and a Ph.D. in social policy, planning, and research from Brandeis University.

Anne Tumlinson has more than two decades of research and consulting experience in post-acute and long-term care financing and delivery. Her consulting firm, Anne Tumlinson Innovations, helps organizations respond to demographic changes and delivery system reform, with a special emphasis on innovations in the design of aging services and products to better meet consumer needs. Ms. Tumlinson has testified before Congress on long-term care financing reform and appeared before the Long-Term Care Commission and the Bipartisan Policy Center. Her testimony has consistently emphasized that the under-financing of long-term care is an economic problem for families and caregivers and stifles the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

innovation needed to help them. Ms. Tumlinson has also created a consumer website, www.daughterhood.org, to generate better content and information for consumers navigating the health and elder care systems on behalf of their parents; and to create a community of women who can educate and inform each other. The daughterhood blog is distributed to subscribers and HuffPost50 readers as well as to a growing social media following. In support of this work, Ms. Tumlinson researches, writes, and speaks about innovation in aging services product and content design, with blogs in Health Affairs and McKnights. Ms. Tumlinson served previously as a senior vice president at Avalere Health, where she founded and led Avalere’s post-acute and long-term care consulting practice for 14 years. There she created, developed and launched a data-based provider navigation tool for post-acute-care placement and led many analytic and modeling projects for a wide variety of clients. Prior to that, she led Medicaid program oversight at the federal Office of Management and Budget.

Michelle M. Washko, Ph.D., M.S., is a deputy director in the Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In her role at the Center for Disability and Aging Policy, she provides substantive expertise in the areas of workforce, health promotion and prevention, and research translation. She came to HHS from the U.S. Department of Labor, where she worked with the Senior Community Service Employment Program, along with developing demonstration grants and conducting analyses on the aging workforce. Previously, she served as a senior research associate at the Institute for the Future of Aging Services, conducting applied research on issues regarding the long-term care workforce and affordable senior housing. She was also an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology and an instructor to older learners in the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Dr. Washko holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in gerontology from the University of Massachusetts, and a masters degree in individual and family studies from the University of Delaware. Along with her work, Dr. Washko is actively engaged in several professional organizations. Since 2000 she has held various appointed and elected positions in The Gerontological Society of America, and was one of the founding members of the International Council of Gerontological Student Organizations in the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics.

Thomas Wlodkowski is the vice president of accessibility at Comcast. Before joining Comcast, Mr. Wlodkowski was at AOL, Inc., where he led accessibility for a decade. Among his many accomplishments there, he

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×

oversaw the launch of AIM Relay, which allows people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech disabled to place phone calls to their friends and family through telecommunication relay services. He has managed a wide scope of projects including development of the cable industry’s first accessible set-top-box interface; the design of accessible user interfaces for Web, mobile, and desktop applications; the opening of a dedicated service center to support customers with disabilities; and consulting on accessible technology to corporations. He is an active participant in public policy initiatives designed to further access to mainstream information and communications technologies. Mr. Wlodkowski holds a bachelor of arts degree from Boston College. He currently sits on the board of trustees for the American Foundation for the Blind and is a member of the Loudoun County Disability Services Board. He previously served on the Federal Communications Commission Consumer Advisory Committee and the board of trustees for the National Braille Press.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and Support Community Living: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21893.
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Living independently and participating in one’s community are priorities for many people. In many regions across the United States, there are programs that support and enable people with disabilities and older adults to live where they choose and with whom they choose and to participate fully in their communities. Tremendous progress has been made. However, in many cases, the programs themselves – and access to them – vary not only between states but also within states. Many programs are small, and even when they prove to be successful they are still not scaled up to meet the needs of the many people who would benefit from them. The challenges can include insufficient workforce, insufficient funding, and lack of evidence demonstrating effectiveness or value.

To get a better understanding of the policies needed to maximize independence and support community living and of the research needed to support implementation of those policies, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a public workshop in October 2015. Participants explored policies in place that promote independence and community living for older adults and people with physical disabilities, and identified policies and gaps in policies that can be barriers to independence and the research needed to support changing those policies. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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