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A Debris Management Handbook for State and Local DOTs and Departments of Public Works (2014)

Chapter: Appendix E - Curbside Collection Program Checklist

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Curbside Collection Program Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. A Debris Management Handbook for State and Local DOTs and Departments of Public Works. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22239.
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Page 150
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Curbside Collection Program Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. A Debris Management Handbook for State and Local DOTs and Departments of Public Works. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22239.
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E-1 A P P E N D I X E 7: Identify/quantify material to be collected (by type and quantity). Recognize that the waste stream is likely to change over time as removal progresses. 7: Determine processing and facility needs. Determine if any facilities in the area have capabili- ties to process certain types of debris. Evaluate landfill capacities, capabilities to separate and/ or recover materials. Evaluate recycling capabilities. 7: Identify labor and equipment needs. Determine what is available in-house, through mutual aid, and through contracts and other resources. 7: Secure funding for the program. Even if the operations are reimbursable through a federal agency, the jurisdiction must provide funds up-front and then seek reimbursement. 7: Review eligibility requirements. Ensure a common understanding of what will and will not be eligible for pickup. If federal reimbursement will be sought, review program eligibility requirements. 7: Select method to locate curbside waste. Determine how curbside waste piles will be identified for pickup (e.g., at street level using staff to do canvassing, use of GIS, etc.). 7: Determine method of implementation. Determine who will conduct pickup (e.g., force account or contractor). Determine if mixed waste streams or segregated material will be picked up at the curb. Determine the number of passes that will be completed. 7: Use drop-off locations, if appropriate. As operations progress, curbside pickup might become inefficient, necessitating the use of drop-off sites to collect remaining debris. 7: Identify temporary storage areas as necessary. Determine if waste will be hauled directly to processing facilities and landfills, or if a debris management site (DMS) will be used to stage and process debris. 7: Identify/establish markets for collected materials. Determine if there is a market or other end use for some of the disaster debris. Consider implementing an incentive program for haulers. 7: Develop methods to encourage reuse or recycling of debris materials. Educate haulers and the public about the benefits of recycling and how to accomplish. 7: Review contract requirements. If contracts will be issued, determine scopes of work. Ensure compliance with all pertinent (e.g., local, state, federal) contracting requirements. As appro- priate, have purchasing departments establish prior claim on contractors through Letters of Agreement. Curbside Collection Program Checklist

E-2 A Debris Management Handbook for State and Local DOTs and Departments of Public Works 7: Develop tracking/documentation system. Track progress to understand accomplishments and work remaining. Document work to ensure the program is being implemented correctly. Also, maintaining documentation of labor and equipment hours is important for seeking federal reimbursement. 7: Develop a public information program/strategy. Determine messaging, media outlets that will be used to inform the public and other stakeholders about the program, including what will be picked up, a schedule, and an end date for the program. Consider how communication with non-English speaking sectors of the community will be accomplished. 7: Develop monitoring and enforcement programs as required. Inspectors and load tickets are two commonly used methods for monitoring a curbside debris collection program. 7: Establish a transportation network with well-defined uses. Classify roads according to their use, vehicle speed, and destination linkage. 7: Consolidate a transportation network, and then clear entire sectors. Transportation corridors progress from primary routes to secondary feeder roads to residential streets. 7: Assign contractors to sectors. Sectors are prioritized so that access to essential services build- ings are cleared first. 7: Mark vehicles used in the transportation of debris (government, contractors, and others) by an easily identifiable permit or bar code to ensure unimpeded access to disaster areas. 7: Handle all soft goods such as bedding, mattresses, curtains, carpeting, and clothes as soon as possible. No salvageable material are collected from these items, which are extremely heavy and hard to handle and need to be mechanically loaded by bucket loaders and/or excavators with grapples. 7: Machine-load trucks hauling debris to maximize space efficiency for each load. Sources: Solis, GY; Hightower, HC; Sussex, J; and Kawaguchi, J (1995) Disaster Debris Management. The Disaster Preparedness Resources Center, The University of British Columbia for Emergency Preparedness Canada, British Columbia. State of Arizona Division of Emergency Management Recovery Section SOP PA, Section 9, Debris Management (May 2008).

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 781: A Debris Management Handbook for State and Local DOTs and Departments of Public Works provides debris management practices for local, tribal, and state departments of transportation and for public works agencies. A PowerPoint presentation and a final report describing the methodology of the project are available online.

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