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Engineering Technology Education in the United States (2017)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Appendix A

Committee Biographies

Katharine G. Frase (NAE), committee cochair, is vice president, Education Business Development for IBM. In this capacity she sets strategy for IBM’s education solutions, including partnerships and customer engagement. Prior to this role, as chief technology officer, IBM Public Sector, she provided thought leadership for IBM and its customers on innovation and strategic transformation specific to government, education, life sciences, health care, and cities, driving the creation of new solutions. Earlier roles included industry solutions research, technical and business strategy for IBM’s software business, corporate assignments on technology assessment and strategy, and roles in IBM Microelectronics in the management of process development, design/modeling methodology and production of chip carriers, assemblies and test. She is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology and sits on numerous external committees and boards. She was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006. Dr. Frase received her AB in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and PhD in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

Ronald M. Latanision (NAE), committee cochair, is a senior fellow at Exponent, Inc., an engineering and scientific consulting company, and an emeritus professor at MIT. He was a principal and corporate vice president at Exponent before assuming his current role. Before joining Exponent, he was director of the H.H. Uhlig Corrosion Laboratory in the Department of Mate-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

rials Science and Engineering at MIT, where he was also on the faculty of the Department of Nuclear Engineering. He was director of the MIT School of Engineering’s Materials Processing Center from 1985 to 1991 and the first holder of the Shell Distinguished Chair in Materials Science (1983–1988). In April 2015 he was appointed an adjunct professor in the Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment of the Institute of Metal Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was a founder of Altran Materials Engineering Corporation, established in 1992. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, ASM International, and NACE International. He has served as a science advisor to the US House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, and in 2002 he was appointed by President George W. Bush to membership on the US Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, reappointed for a second four-year term by President Barack Obama. Dr. Latanision received a BS in metallurgy from Pennsylvania State University and a PhD in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University. He is an honorary alumnus of MIT.

Walter Buchanan is a professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution, College of Engineering, Texas A&M University. Previously, he was professor and director of the School of Engineering Technology at Northeastern University. Other academic posts include professor and dean of Engineering and Industrial Technologies at the Oregon Institute of Technology; associate professor and chair of Engineering Technology and Industrial Studies at Middle Tennessee State University; assistant professor and coordinator of the Electrical Engineering Technology Associate Degree Program at the University of Central Florida; and assistant professor of electrical engineering technology at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis. He has also been an electronics engineer for the Naval Avionics Center, an engineering officer for the US Navy, an aerospace engineer for Boeing Co. and Martin Co., and an attorney for the Veterans Administration in Indianapolis. He is a fellow and past president of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), a fellow of the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME). He served on the NSPE board of directors, and chaired the ASEE Engineering Technology Council and NSPE Professional Engineers in Higher Education. He is a past member of the Executive Committee of the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). He has received the ASEE James H. McGraw Award and Frederick J. Berger Award, the NSPE Outstanding Service Award, and the International Conference on Engineering and Computer Education Award. He is on the editorial or advisory boards of several journals, including the Journal of Engineering Technology, American Journal of Engineering Education, and International Journal of Engineering Research & Innovation, and has authored or coauthored more than 200 publications. He has consulted for more than 20 organizations and been a principal investigator for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other grants. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and languages from Indiana University, and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in interdisciplinary engineering from Purdue University, as well as a law degree and PhD in higher education from Indiana University.

Imelda (Mel) E. Cossette is executive director and principal investigator of the National Resource Center for Materials Education Technology, an NSF Advanced Technological Education Center at Edmonds Community College in Lynnwood, Washington, that engages nationally with materials science, advanced manufacturing, and engineering technology programs. Ms. Cossette manages the Materials in STEM (M-STEM) Workshop, a 3-day professional development forum that brings 2- and 4-year instructors, K–12 teachers, and industry together around materials science and STEM education. She is also a co-PI on two other NSF grants: the National Resource Center for Aerospace Technical Education (SpaceTEC), an NSF ATE center in eastern Florida, where she helped develop a national certification for composites and assisted in the development of a national certification examination in manufacturing; and the Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials Engineering Research Center, at North Carolina Agricultural and Technology State University. She was the PI on an NSF-funded project on Proven Practices and Strategies for Recruitment of Women and Underrepresented Populations into STEM Careers. She was previously program manager and trainer with the International Association of Machinists/Boeing Joint Programs and supervisor of work-based learning programs at Lake Washington Institute of Technology. She serves on numerous boards, including the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, PowerAmerica Institute, and the Latino Educational Training Institute. Ms. Cossette has a master’s of education degree from City University of Seattle and a vocational education certificate from Shoreline Community College, both in Washington State.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

Werner Eikenbusch is head of talent management in the Americas for BMW Group Corporate Human Resources, responsible for the development and adaptation of talent management strategies and concepts in the region. Drawing on his experiences in apprenticeship and engineering programs in Germany and the United States, Mr. Eikenbusch helped create new talent development programs for BMW in the Americas. For example, the BMW Scholars program is a dual study/work education program, modeled after the German system, in which students enroll full-time at local technical colleges for 2 years while training as apprentices in the BMW factory in South Carolina for 20 hours a week; and the Engineering & Operations Management Development Program works with recent college graduates through a 2-year rotational program. Mr. Eikenbusch began his career as a manufacturing engineer for BMW in Munich. He has served on several boards for education and workforce development topics. He holds an MS degree in management engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology, where he was a Fulbright Scholar; and a Dipl. Ing. (FH) Maschinenbau, earned in Germany.

Christopher Russell Fox (until January 5, 2015) is a former manufacturing engineering teacher at Atholton High School (2009–2013) and technology education teacher at Folly Quarter Middle School (2003–2009), both in Howard County, Maryland. He has helped write curriculum for the Howard County Public School System, the Utah Online Charter Schools (in computer science), the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (Engineering by Design program), and the State of Maryland (Voluntary State Curriculum), and raised money to support student teams participating in FIRST robotics in Howard County. He has advanced degrees in career and technical education from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and in administration and supervision from the Johns Hopkins University. His undergraduate degree is from Western Michigan University in vocational education with a concentration in machine tool technology and computer-aided drafting. He has an associate’s degree in applied science in machine tool technology from Southwestern Michigan College, and a certificate in engineering education through Project Lead the Way, earned at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Joyce M. Gleason has been a science educator for more than 40 years. As an educational consultant, her clients have included Annenberg Media and the Smithsonian Institution, and she has conducted staff development sessions

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

for Boston, Southbridge, and Hadley Public Schools in Massachusetts and strategic planning workshops for the National Science Teachers Association, the Connecticut Science Teachers Association, and the Massachusetts Association of Science Teachers. Previous positions include director of outreach for the Annenberg/CPB Channel (now Annenberg Learner), based at the Science Media Group of Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; science curriculum liaison with the Worcester (MA) public school system, where she helped introduce a K–12 technology/design engineering curriculum; and 26 years as a high school biology teacher. She was in 2000 selected as Science Teacher of the Year by the Massachusetts Association of Science Teachers. She has an AB degree in the biological sciences from Mount Holyoke College, an MALS in science from Wesleyan University, and a CAES in curriculum and instruction from Boston College.

Daniel Hull is the principal investigator and executive director of the NSF/ATE-funded National Center for Optics and Photonics Education (OP-TEC). Prior to his role at OP-TEC, he founded the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD), which focuses on technician preparation, and led it from 1979 to 2006. He also founded the National Coalition for Advanced Technology Centers (NCATC) and National Career Pathways Network (NCPN), and is cofounder of the NSF/ATE HI-TEC Conference. He is the author of seven books on technician education and contextual teaching, including Career Pathways for STEM Technicians (2012), Adult Career Pathways (2007), and Career Pathways: Education with a Purpose (2005). He is a registered professional engineer with 13 years of practice in the laser field and more than 30 years of experience leading education reform efforts in the United States and throughout the world. He is a senior member of the Society for Optics and Photonics, the Optical Society of America, and the Laser Institute of America.

Sharon Levin is professor of economics emerita at the University of Missouri–St. Louis. She joined the department in 1974 and chaired it from 1987 to 1998. Before accepting an early retirement in December 2002, she was also director of graduate studies and department cochair. Her research focuses on factors affecting the productivity, quality, and composition of the scientific workforce. Major themes have been the effects on the careers of US scientists and engineers of the diffusion of information technology and immigration. Her research has been funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Exxon Education Foundation,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

and NSF. She has assisted the National Research Council and has been a member of the Scientific and Engineering Workforce Project sponsored by the National Bureau of Economic Research in conjunction with the Sloan Foundation. She was a consultant to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute on issues concerning scientific productivity over the life cycle. In 1993 she received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research and Creativity from the University of Missouri–St. Louis. She has published numerous articles in journals including The American Economic Review, Management Science, Science, and The Review of Economics and Statistics. In 1992 she coauthored, with Paula Stephan, Striking the Mother Lode in Science (Oxford University Press). Her research on the careers of scientists and engineers has also been the focus of articles in The Economist, Science, The Scientist, and other newspapers and magazines in the United States and abroad. Dr. Levin graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and earned her BA from the City College of New York (Phi Beta Kappa) and her MA and PhD from the University of Michigan, all in economics.

Jeffrey Ray is dean of the College of Engineering and Technology at Western Carolina University (WCU). The College is home to accredited programs in construction, engineering, and technology. He has held several positions in academia including dean of engineering technology and management at Southern Polytechnic State University (now Kennesaw State University) in Marietta, Georgia; and director of Grand Valley State University’s School of Engineering, with responsibility for the interdisciplinary industry-sponsored senior capstone design program. As an educator, Mr. Ray likes to draw on his precollege experience as a journeyman industrial electrician and machinery troubleshooter. His attention to diversity issues, contacts with the K–12 community, and transformative approach to engineering and engineering technology education have had a major impact on thousands of students. He has held leadership positions with the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), including vice president of the executive board and chair of the engineering technology council. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tennessee Technological University and his doctorate from Vanderbilt University, all in mechanical engineering.

Michael Richey is an associate technical fellow assigned to support technology and innovation research at the Boeing Company. He leads a team conducting engineering education research to improve the learning experience for students, incumbent engineers, and technicians. His research encom-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

passes sociotechnical systems, learning curves, and engineering education. His responsibility to provide business leadership for engineering technical and professional educational programs includes development of certificate and master’s engineering programs in advanced aircraft construction, composite structures, systems engineering, product lifecycle management, and digital manufacturing. Under his leadership, the Boeing Company has won multiple awards for excellence and innovation for industry academic partnerships and joint programs. Dr. Richey has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Engineering Education, Boeing Higher Education Integration Board, American Society for Engineering Education Project Board, and the NSF Industry-University Collaborative Research Center (I-UCRC) Advisory Board. He has authored or coauthored more than 30 publications in leading journals, including Science and The Journal of Engineering Education, addressing topics in large-scale system integration, learning sciences, and systems engineering. He often represents Boeing internationally and domestically as a speaker and has authored multiple patents on computer-aided design/manufacturing, with disclosures focused on system engineering and elegant design. He holds a BA and MS from ESC Lille in program project management and a PhD from SKEMA Business School with a focus on engineering education research.

Melvin L. Roberts is a registered professional engineer and immediate past dean of the Division of Business, Computer, and Technical Studies at Camden County College, in Blackwood, New Jersey. Since November 2013 he has also been dean of Occupational Skills & Customized Training at the college. Before those assignments, he spent a combined 17 years as associate professor and then chair of the college’s Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Engineering Technology program, where he taught courses in PLC programming and industrial automation. After 7½ years as dean, he returned to the faculty ranks in August 2014, and was recently promoted to professor of engineering science and computer-integrated manufacturing engineering technology. From 2007 through 2014, Dr. Roberts was program chair of the ASEE Two-Year College (TYC) Division and he has been the TYC Division Chair as well since 2009. He holds a BS in mechanical engineering cum laude from Howard University, an MS in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a PhD in educational leadership from Wilmington University, Delaware.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

James R. Stone III is director of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) at the Southern Regional Education Board. NRCCTE is the nation’s primary agent for research in career and technical education (CTE) and an important source of professional development and technical assistance for CTE professionals, particularly at state and local leadership levels. Dr. Stone’s research has focused on strategies that improve the capacity of CTE programs to improve the engagement, achievement, and transition of secondary and postsecondary CTE participants, including longitudinal studies on the effects of work-based learning and the effect of whole-school, CTE-based school reforms on educational outcomes of youth in high-poverty communities. Dr. Stone led an interdisciplinary team in a randomized controlled trial of an innovative pedagogic and professional development strategy to integrate mathematics into high school CTE curricula (Math-in-CTE). A former editor for the Journal of Vocational Education Research, he has published numerous articles, books, and book chapters on CTE. His most recent book is College and Career Readiness for the 21st Century: Making High School Matter (2012, Teacher’s College Press). He was previously a professor and Distinguished University Scholar, Department of Leadership, Foundations & Human Resource Education, College of Education and Human Development, University of Louisville, and is now professor emeritus, University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development. He holds an Ed.D. in vocational-technical education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, an M.Ed. in school administration from George Mason University, and a BS degree in distributive education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University.

Will Tyson is an associate professor of sociology at the University of South Florida. His research examines STEM educational and career pathways with a focus on student- and institutional-level influences on high school and college science and math course taking and STEM degree attainment. He was the principal investigator of the NSF-funded project “Successful Academic and Employment Pathways in Advanced Technologies” (PathTech; 4 years, $1.2 million), a collaboration with Tampa Bay area high schools, community colleges, and local technology and manufacturing industry to better understand pathways to engineering technology AS degree and certificate programs and back into the local workforce. Dr. Tyson is also the PI of the follow-up study “PathTech LIFE: A National Survey of LIFE (Learning, Interests, Family, and Employment) Experiences Influencing Pathways into Advanced Technologies” (3 years, $776,888), involving a national survey of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

community college students who are completing coursework, certificates, and degrees in engineering technology and related technology fields. He is coeditor of Becoming an Engineer in Public Universities: Pathways for Women and Minorities (2010) based on NSF-funded research in colleges of engineering in Florida universities and has published on secondary and postsecondary pathways to engineering and other STEM bachelor’s degrees as well as faculty climate in STEM programs. He holds PhD and master’s degrees in sociology from Duke University and a BA in sociology and psychology from Wake Forest University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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The vitality of the innovation economy in the United States depends on the availability of a highly educated technical workforce. A key component of this workforce consists of engineers, engineering technicians, and engineering technologists. However, unlike the much better-known field of engineering, engineering technology (ET) is unfamiliar to most Americans and goes unmentioned in most policy discussions about the US technical workforce. Engineering Technology Education in the United States seeks to shed light on the status, role, and needs of ET education in the United States.

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