National Academies Press: OpenBook

Engineering Technology Education in the United States (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee's Analyses

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Biographies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee's Analyses." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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Appendix B

Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee’s Analyses

ACS—American Community Survey is the annual, nationally representative household survey conducted by the US Census Bureau. The ACS serves as the “annual census” and is sufficiently large to allow for analysis of relatively small geographies.

B&B—Baccalaureate and Beyond, 2008/09, is a nationally representative survey of college graduates in 2008 and 2009 produced by the National Center for Education Statistics. It provides detailed course taking and employment information on graduates.

CPS—Current Population Survey is the monthly, nationally representative household survey conducted by the US Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. CPS is the principal labor market survey produced by the federal government.

IPEDS—The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System is a detailed annual data file produced by the National Center for Education Statistics reporting degree awards by field and degree level for all accredited colleges and universities in the United States. Numerous additional institutional characteristics are also available.

NAICS—NAICS is the North American Industrial Classification System—the standard used by federal statistical agencies and economists to classify businesses according to the products they produce and their industry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee's Analyses." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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NSCG—National Survey of College Graduates is the irregular survey of 4-year degree holders by the National Science Foundation. NSCG collects information on educational and job experiences and particularly focuses on the science and engineering workforce.

OES—Occupational Employment Statistics are the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ annual estimates of employment and earnings by detailed occupation. OES is produced from an establishment survey, rather than from a household survey.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee's Analyses." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
×
Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Descriptions of Datasets Used in the Committee's Analyses." National Academy of Engineering. 2017. Engineering Technology Education in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23402.
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The vitality of the innovation economy in the United States depends on the availability of a highly educated technical workforce. A key component of this workforce consists of engineers, engineering technicians, and engineering technologists. However, unlike the much better-known field of engineering, engineering technology (ET) is unfamiliar to most Americans and goes unmentioned in most policy discussions about the US technical workforce. Engineering Technology Education in the United States seeks to shed light on the status, role, and needs of ET education in the United States.

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