National Academies Press: OpenBook

National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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B

Meetings and Speakers

MEETING 1
February 23-24, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD)

Douglas Loverro, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy

Karen St. Germain, Deputy Director for Mission Analysis

Intelligence Community

Lawrence Gershwin, National Intelligence Officer for Space and Technical Intelligence

Missile and Space Intelligence Center (DIA)

National Air and Space Intelligence Center (Air Force)

Weapons Intelligence Non-Proliferation and Arms Control (CIA)

MEETING 2
March 19-20, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Office of the Secretary of Defense

Thomas Morgan, Chief, Space Capabilities Division, OUSD(I)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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OSD Cost Analysis and Program Evaluation

Steven Miller (SES), Director, Advanced Systems Cost Analysis

Headquarters, U.S. Air Force

Maj Gen Martin Whelan, Director of Space Operations, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force

Headquarters, U.S. Navy

William Flynn (Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service), Senior Advisor for Space, Chief of Naval Operations, N2N6E

Air Force Space Command

Thomas Walker

U.S. Department of State

HON Frank Rose, Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance

National Reconnaissance Office

Stewart Cameron (CIA Senior Intelligence Service), Director, Survivability Assurance Office

MEETING 3
April 7-9, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Inmarsat

Susan Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer

Peter Hadinger, President, U.S. Government Business

Lockheed Martin

Kathy Tobey, Vice President and General Manager

Marc Berkowitz, Strategic Planning Director

Aerospace Corporation

Cathy Steele, Senior Vice President, National Systems Group

Craig Lindsay, Principal Director, Space Control Directorate

Don Lewis, Principal Director, Strategic Awareness and Policy

Northrop Grumman Corporation

Tim Frei, Vice President, Communications Systems

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

The Boeing Company

Umesh Ketkar, Director, Advanced Space and Intelligence Systems

Intelsat

Rory Welch, Director of Business Development

MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Jay Donnelly, Assistant Division Head, Aerospace Division

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Brad Tousley, Director, Tactical Technology Office

Headquarters, U.S. Air Force

Maj Gen Roger Teague, Director, Space Programs, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition

U.S. Strategic Command

Evan Hoapili, Associate Director, Capability and Resource Integration

Office of Science and Technology Policy

Travis Blake, Senior Advisor for National Security Space

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

John Charles, National GEOINT Officer for Commercial Imagery

Office of the Secretary of Defense

Gil Klinger, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space and Intelligence, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics)

Space Security and Defense Program

Andrew Cox, Director

Russell Partch

MEETING 4
May 7-8, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Office of the Secretary of Defense

James Martin (SES), Director of Defense Intelligence for Intelligence Strategy, Programs, and Resources

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

MEETING 5
June 1, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Writing meeting

MEETING 6
July 1-2, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Joint Functional Component Command for Space

Lt Gen John W. “Jay” Raymond, Commander 14th Air Force, Air Force Space Command; Commander, Joint Functional Component Command for Space, U.S. Strategic Command

Space and Missile Systems Center

Col Erik C. Bowman, Deputy Director, Space Superiority Systems Directorate, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California

Air Force Research Laboratory

Brandon Arritt, Program Manager, Space Resilience Technologies Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate

Sandia National Laboratories

John Rowe, Sandia Fellow

David Cox

U.S. Air Force

Scott Hardiman, Deputy Chief, Space, Aerial and Nuclear Networks, U.S. Air Force

MEETING 7
August 27-28, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Naval Research Laboratory

John Schaub

National Security Agency

Ryan Agee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

U.S. Government

Sean R.

MEETING 8
October 8-9, 2015
Washington, D.C.

Writing meeting

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 62
National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report Get This Book
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It is not yet 60 years since the first artificial satellite was placed into Earth orbit. In just over a half century, mankind has gone from no presence in outer space to a condition of high dependence on orbiting satellites. These sensors, receivers, transmitters, and other such devices, as well as the satellites that carry them, are components of complex space systems that include terrestrial elements, electronic links between and among components, organizations to provide the management, care and feeding, and launch systems that put satellites into orbit. In many instances, these space systems connect with and otherwise interact with terrestrial systems; for example, a very long list of Earth-based systems cannot function properly without information from the Global Positioning System (GPS).

Space systems are fundamental to the information business, and the modern world is an information-driven one. In addition to navigation (and associated timing), space systems provide communications and imagery and other Earth-sensing functions. Among these systems are many that support military, intelligence, and other national security functions of the United States and many other nations. Some of these are unique government, national security systems; however, functions to support national security are also provided by commercial and civil-government space systems.


The importance of space systems to the United States and its allies and potential adversaries raises major policy issues. National Security Space Defense and Protection reviews the range of options available to address threats to space systems, in terms of deterring hostile actions, defeating hostile actions, and surviving hostile actions, and assesses potential strategies and plans to counter such threats. This report recommends architectures, capabilities, and courses of action to address such threats and actions to address affordability, technology risk, and other potential barriers or limiting factors in implementing such courses of action.

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