National Academies Press: OpenBook

Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two (2017)

Chapter: Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
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D

Acronyms and Abbreviations

ANSI American National Standards Institute
ARPA-E Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy
ARRA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers

BES

basic energy sciences

BTP Building Technologies Program
Btu British thermal unit
BULB Act Better Use of Light Bulbs Act

CBECS

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

CCT correlated color temperature
cd candela
CFL compact fluorescent light
CIE International Commission on Illumination (Commission Internationale d’Eclerage)
CISPR Special International Committee on Radio Interference (Comité International Spécial des Perturbations Radioélectriques)
CLTC California Lighting Technology Center
CNT carbon nanotube
COB chip on board
CRI color rendering index

DALI

Digital Addressable Lighting Interface

DLA Defense Logistics Agency
DLC Design Lights™ Consortium
DOD Department of Defense
DOE Department of Energy
DSM demand side management
DTV digital television

EBL

exciton blocking layer

EERE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
EIA Energy Information Administration
EISA Energy Independence and Security Act
EML light emissive layer
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
EPACT Energy Policy Act
EPCA Energy Policy and Conservation Act
EQE external quantum efficiency
ERDA Energy Research and Development Administration
ETL electron transport layer

fc

foot-candle

FTC Federal Trade Commission

GAO

Government Accountability Office

GSA General Services Administration

HID

high-intensity discharge

HIL hole injection layer
HP high power
HTL hole transport layer
HVPE hydride vapor phase epitaxy

IALD

International Association of Lighting Designers

ICC International Code Council
IDA International Dark-Sky Association
IEC International Electrotechnical Commission
IECC International Energy Conservation Code
IES Illuminating Engineering Society of North America
IoT Internet of Things
IQE internal quantum efficiency
ISS International Space Station
IT information technology
ITO indium tin oxide

L Prize

Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize

LBNL Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
LED light-emitting diode
LER luminous efficacy of radiation
LES light-emitting surface
LFL linear fluorescent lamp
LIPA Long Island Power Authority
lm lumen
LP low power
LPD lighting power density
LRC Lighting Research Center
LUMEN Lighting Understanding for a More Efficient Nation
lx lux

MCPCB

metal-core printed circuit board

MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey
MOCVD metal-organic chemical vapor deposition
MP mid-power
MQW multiple quantum well
MR multifaceted reflector

NAECA

National Appliance Energy Conservation Act

NEEP Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships
NEMA National Electrical Manufacturers Association
NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology
NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
NRC National Research Council
NYSERDA New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

OLED

organic light-emitting diode

ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory
OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense
OVPD organic vapor phase deposition

PAR

parabolic aluminized reflector

PCAST Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology
PF power factor
PFS potassium fluorosilicate
PG&E Pacific Gas & Electric Company
PHOLED phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode
PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

QD

quantum dot

R&D

research and development

RD&D research, development, and demonstration
RECS Residential Energy Consumption Survey
RGB red, green, and blue
RGBY red, green, blue, and yellow
RoHS restriction of hazardous substances

SBIR

Small Business Innovation Research

SCHER Scientific Committee on Health and Environmental Risks
SOLED stacked organic light-emitting diode
SPD spectral power distribution
SSL solid-state lighting

TCO

transparent conductive oxide

THD total harmonic distortion
TIM thermal interface material
TIR total internal reflection
TLED tubular light-emitting diode
TWh terawatt-hours (1012 watt-hours)

UL

Underwriters Laboratories

UV ultraviolet

VLC

visual light communication VTE vacuum thermal evaporation

WOLED

white organic light-emitting diode

YAG

yttrium-aluminum garnet

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
Page 102
Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two Get This Book
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The standard incandescent light bulb, which still works mainly as Thomas Edison invented it, converts more than 90% of the consumed electricity into heat. Given the availability of newer lighting technologies that convert a greater percentage of electricity into useful light, there is potential to decrease the amount of energy used for lighting in both commercial and residential applications. Although technologies such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) have emerged in the past few decades and will help achieve the goal of increased energy efficiency, solid-state lighting (SSL) stands to play a large role in dramatically decreasing U.S. energy consumption for lighting.

Since the publication of the 2013 National Research Council report Assessment of Advanced Solid-State Lighting, the penetration of SSL has increased dramatically, with a resulting savings in energy and costs that were foreshadowed by that study. What was not anticipated then is the dramatic dislocation and restructuring of the SSL marketplace, as cost reductions for light-emitting diode (LED) components reduced profitability for LED manufacturers. At the same time, there has been the emergence of new applications for SSL, which have the potential to create new markets and commercial opportunities for the SSL industry.

Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two discusses these aspects of change—highlighting the progress of commercialization and acceptance of SSL and reviewing the technical advances and challenges in achieving higher efficacy for LEDs and organic light-emitting diodes. This report will also discuss the recent trends in SSL manufacturing and opportunities for new applications and describe the role played by the Department of Energy (DOE) Lighting Program in the development of SSL.

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