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The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research (2017)

Chapter: Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
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Appendix E

Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Marie C. McCormick, M.D., Sc.D. (Chair), is currently the Sumner and Esther Feldberg Professor of Maternal and Child Health in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a professor of pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School, and she is also a senior associate for academic affairs in the Department of Neonatology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. McCormick is a pediatrician with a second doctorate in health services research, with all of her postgraduate training done at Johns Hopkins. In 1987 she joined the faculty of the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and in 1991 she became a professor and the chair of the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and a professor of pediatrics. Her research has focused on the effectiveness of perinatal and neonatal health services on the health of women and children with a particular concern in the outcomes of very premature infants. She has been a senior investigator on the evaluations of two national demonstration programs (the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Perinatal Regionalization Program and, currently, the federal Healthy Start Program). In addition, she has provided significant scientific input, in a variety of roles, to the design and conduct of Infant Health and Development Project, the largest multisite, randomized trial of early childhood educational intervention, in particular, serving as the principal investigator of the follow-up done at 18 years of age. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, among other organizations. Her work

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

on several committees, most notably the Immunization Safety Review Committee, has earned her the David Rall Medal for exceptional service.

Donald I. Abrams, M.D., is chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and a professor of clinical medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He was one the original clinician/investigators to recognize and define many early AIDS-related conditions. He has long been interested in clinical trials of complementary medicine interventions for human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and cancer, including evaluations of medicinal cannabis. In 1997 he received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to conduct a clinical trial of the short-term safety of cannabinoids in HIV infection. Subsequently he was granted funds by the University of California Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research to conduct studies of the effectiveness of cannabis in a number of clinical conditions. He completed a placebo-controlled study of smoked cannabis in patients with painful HIV-related peripheral neuropathy as well as a study evaluating vaporization as a smokeless delivery system for medicinal cannabis. His last National Institute on Drug Abuse–funded trial investigated the safety and pharmacokinetic interaction between vaporized cannabis and sustained-release opioid analgesics in patients with chronic pain. He is currently conducting a translational National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute–funded trial investigating vaporized cannabis in patients with sickle cell disease. He received an A.B. in molecular biology from Brown University in 1972 and graduated from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1977. After completing an internal medicine residency at the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco, he became a fellow in hematology-oncology at UCSF, before joining the faculty. In 2004, he completed a distance learning fellowship in integrative medicine from the University of Arizona and has since been providing integrative oncology consultations at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine.

Margarita Alegría, Ph.D., is the chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Alegría is currently the principal investigator (PI) of four National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded research studies: International Latino Research Partnership; Effects of Social Context, Culture and Minority Status on Depression and Anxiety; Building Community Capacity for Disability Prevention for Minority Elders; and Mechanisms Underlying Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mental Disorders. She is also the co-PI of a William T. Grant Foundation project titled Understanding the Experience of Majority and Minority Sta-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
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tus through Photovoice. Dr. Alegría has published more than 200 papers, editorials, intervention training manuals, and several book chapters on topics such as improvement of health care services delivery for diverse racial and ethnic populations, conceptual and methodological issues with multicultural populations, and ways to bring the community’s perspective into the design and implementation of health services. In 2011, she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Medicine. The recipient of several awards, Dr. Alegría was recently selected as El Planeta’s (Massachusetts’s largest circulating Spanish-language newspaper) 2013’s Powermeter 100 most influential people for the Hispanic community in Massachusetts. Dr. Alegría also received the 2016 Cynthia Lucero Latino Mental Health Award by William James College.

William Checkley, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and has a joint appointment in the Department of International Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. His areas of clinical expertise include epidemiology, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. Dr. Checkley also serves as the medical director for Johns Hopkins International. Dr. Checkley earned his M.D. from Northwestern University and received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He completed his internal medicine residency training at Emory University and his fellowship training in pulmonary and critical care medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His research interests include international lung health, epidemiology, mechanical ventilation, and acute lung injury. Dr. Checkley has been recognized by the National Institutes of Health with the 2007 Postdoctoral National Research Service Award and the 2009 Pathway to Independence Career Award. He is certified in pulmonary disease and internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

R. Lorraine Collins, Ph.D., is a psychologist and professor of community health and health behavior and the associate dean for research at the State University of New York at Buffalo (UB) School of Public Health and Health Professions (SPHHP). For two decades she conducted research as a senior scientist at UB’s Research Institute on Addictions before joining the SPHHP as associate dean for research in 2008. Dr. Collins’s research interests include cognitive and behavioral approaches to the conceptualization, prevention, and treatment of addictive behaviors, particularly among emerging and young adults. Examples of her projects funded by the National Institutes of Health include a study to examine the combined use of alcohol and marijuana and a study of the use of technology in interventions to reduce marijuana use.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

Ziva D. Cooper, Ph.D., is an associate professor of clinical neurobiology in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Cooper’s primary research focus is translational studies investigating the effects of abused drugs and how these effects differ between males and females. For nearly a decade, she has been building on her training in preclinical models of drug dependence and developing an expertise in human laboratory studies on cannabis, cannabinoids, opioids, and cocaine while maintaining research projects in animal models of substance use. Her current research investigates the direct neurobiological effects of emerging drugs of abuse, including synthetic cannabinoids (i.e., K2, Spice) in laboratory animals and the direct physiological and behavioral effects of cannabis and cannabinoids as they pertain to both their abuse potential and potential therapeutic effects in double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory studies.

Adre J. du Plessis, M.B.Ch.B., M.P.H., is the director of the Fetal Medicine Institute, the division chief of fetal and transitional medicine, and director of the Fetal Brain Program at Children’s National Health System. In addition, Dr. Du Plessis is a professor of pediatrics and neurology at the George Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Du Plessis is a leading international expert in the normal and abnormal development of the brain as well as the mechanisms of injury to the immature brain. His career-long research focus has been on the nervous system of the fetus and newborn, the hazards and mechanisms of injury, and the potential prevention of insult to the brain. Under his leadership, the Fetal Medicine Institute provides individualized and specialized care to patients during and after the baby’s birth. Dr. Du Plessis received his M.B.Ch.B. from the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He trained in pediatrics at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and at Penn State University. In addition, he trained in child neurology at the St. Louis and Boston Children’s Hospitals.

Sarah Feldstein Ewing, Ph.D., is a professor at the Oregon Health and Science University. Dr. Feldstein Ewing is a licensed clinical child psychologist with more than a decade of experience using a variety of evidence-based approaches to prevent and intervene with adolescent health risk behavior, including alcohol use, cannabis use, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) risk behavior. At this time, her lab has enrolled more than 1,000 youth within large-scale clinical trials to evaluate the developmental fit and treatment outcomes for motivational interviewing, behavioral skills training, cognitive behavioral approaches, mindfulness, and contingency management. She has published widely regarding the developmental fit, neurocognitive

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

mechanisms, gender differences, and cross-cultural adaptation of these prevention and intervention approaches for this developmental stage. She has also developed a highly innovative National Institutes of Health–funded line of translational research, evaluating the connection between basic biological mechanisms (e.g., functional brain activation, brain structure, genetic factors) and youth health risk behavior (e.g., clinical symptoms, HIV risk behaviors, treatment outcomes). She has conducted this work with alcohol-abusing adolescents, cannabis-abusing adolescents, adolescents engaged in risky sex, and youths with a high body mass index. Ultimately, the goal of her laboratory is to employ translational studies to (1) determine the driving factors underlying successful treatment outcomes, (2) develop more efficacious interventions, and (3) evaluate the efficacy of interventions in order to improve health outcomes and reduce the current disparities for high-risk adolescents of all backgrounds.

Sean Hennessy, Pharm.D., Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and a professor of systems pharmacology and translational therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. His primary field of interest is pharmacoepidemiology, which is the study of the health effects of medications in populations.

Kent Hutchison, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology and neuroscience and the director of clinical training at the University of Colorado Boulder. He completed his Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Oklahoma State University and then subsequently completed an internship at Brown University, where he stayed as a postdoctoral fellow specializing in research on addiction from 1995 to 1998. After leaving Brown University, Dr. Hutchison accepted a faculty position at the University of Colorado Boulder. He was promoted to associate professor in 2002 and full professor in 2007. Dr. Hutchison moved to the Mind Research Network (MRN) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to pursue a program of research combining neuroimaging, clinical outcomes, and genetics in 2007, where he served as the chief science officer for 2 years. In 2011 he returned to the University of Colorado to help set up the Intermountain Neuroimaging Consortium, which involves the operation of two identical magnetic resonance scanners, one in Albuquerque at MRN and one in Boulder at the University of Colorado. He continues to serve as a liaison between the two organizations. Dr. Hutchison has a long track record of funding from the National Institutes of Health and publications. His research combines neuroimaging, epigenetic, pharmacological, and clinical perspectives. Recently he has focused on how inflammatory processes that result from alcohol abuse may damage important executive control circuits in the brain, ultimately contributing to loss of control over alcohol use. In large

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

part because of the change in Colorado law legalizing cannabis, he has also become very interested in cannabinoids and has launched several studies to gather data about the effects of cannabis with different ratios of tetrahydrocannabinol to cannabidiol on a variety of measures, including measures related to cognitive function and immune system inflammation.

Norbert E. Kaminski, Ph.D., is the director of the Institute for Integrative Toxicology and a professor of pharmacology and toxicology in the Cell and Molecular Biology Program at Michigan State University. Research being conducted in his laboratory is in the general areas of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology and encompasses a number of extramurally funded projects. A major emphasis of all of these projects is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the impairment of signal transduction cascades and gene expression during lymphocyte activation by drugs and chemicals. One major research focus is to characterize the mechanism for immune modulation by cannabinoid compounds. This effort has led to the first characterization of cannabinoid receptors within the immune system. Current goals include elucidation of signal transduction events initiated through—as well as independently of—cannabinoid receptors, including the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARy), leading to aberrant cytokine gene expression by T lymphocytes. A second major research focus is the characterization of the molecular mechanism responsible for altered B cell function produced by halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, including dioxins and polychlorinated biphenols. This research, which resulted in the first characterization of the aryl hydrocarbon (AH) receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator in B cells, has led to testing of the hypothesis that dioxin and dioxin-like compounds suppress antibody responses by impairing B cell differentiation in an AH receptor-dependent manner. A third area of his research concerns studies aimed at characterizing the role of cytokine expression patterns in airway remodeling induced by chemical and protein respiratory allergens as well as by respiratory pathogens.

Sachin Patel, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of molecular physiology and biophysics and director of the Division of Addiction Psychiatry at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Patel’s overall research goal is to understand the role of neuronal cannabinoid signaling in brain function relevant to psychiatric disorders. His lab has recently focused specifically on the role of the cannabinoid system in the regulation of stress response physiology and the subsequent development of anxiety and depressive phenotypes relevant to affective disorders. The lab is using animal models to examine the effects of adolescent stress exposure on the cannabinoid system and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

cannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity in the amygdala, a key brain region implicated in affective disorders and developmental disorders, including autism. His lab is also interested in the role of cannabinoid signaling in modulating behavioral and synaptic alterations induced by very early life stress. Given that stress, especially early life stress, is associated with significantly higher rates of psychiatric disorders, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, understanding the cellular and molecular adaptations induced by stress exposure could provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic interventions for stress-related psychiatric disorders in children and adults. Another major focus of Dr. Patel’s research is understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and how these forms of plasticity change during development. Understanding how the cannabinoid system modulates synaptic efficacy within emotional centers of the brain could provide mechanistic insight into developmental alterations induced by cannabis use during adolescence, which has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. His lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms by which cannabis exposure early in life leads to an increased risk for the development of psychiatric disorders during adulthood.

Daniele Piomelli, Ph.D., is a professor of anatomy and neurobiology, has joint appointments in biological chemistry and pharmacology, and holds the Louise Turner Arnold Chair in Neurosciences at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), School of Medicine. Dr. Piomelli was trained in neuroscience and pharmacology. Research in his lab is focused on the function of lipid-derived messengers, with particular emphasis on the endogenous cannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Current research efforts converge on three areas: the formation and deactivation of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; physiological roles of the endogenous cannabinoid system; and development of therapeutic agents that target anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol metabolism. Primary neural cell cultures and state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as liquid chromatography/mass-spectrometry are used to investigate the formation and deactivation of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in brain cells. Protein purification and cloning approaches are employed to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. Cellular pharmacology and medicinal chemistry, in collaboration with leading international labs, are used to identify pharmacological agents that interfere with various aspects of endogenous cannabinoid function, and their therapeutic potential is explored in vitro and in vivo.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of research clinics at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, where he has been conducting epidemiological studies since 1982. He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is a fellow of the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention. Dr. Sidney’s research interests include cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, physical activity and fitness, cognitive function, and obesity, with an emphasis on health disparities. He conducted a National Institute on Drug Abuse–funded study from 1991 to 1994 on health outcomes associated with marijuana use utilizing survey and health outcome data from Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care system. He is the principal investigator of the Oakland field center of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute–funded Cardiovascular Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, an ongoing 30-year longitudinal study of cardiovascular risk and disease development in individuals who were 18–30 years old at baseline, which includes marijuana use data collected throughout the study period. Dr. Sidney has authored or co-authored more than 360 peer-reviewed scientific publications covering a diverse range of topics, primarily in the area of cardiovascular epidemiology and also including more than 20 articles regarding epidemiological aspects of cannabis use and health outcomes. He received a B.A. in mathematics from Yale University, an M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine, and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health.

Robert B. Wallace, M.D., M.Sc., is the Irene Ensminger Stecher professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine. He has a variety of public health experiences. He was an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has conducted many population health studies as well as clinical trials, focusing on the prevention and control of chronic illnesses and other disabling conditions of older persons. These have included neurological conditions, fracture, cancers, coronary disease, mental illnesses, and the health of older women. He has continuing experience with community interventions related to the prevention of falls and motor vehicle injuries in older persons. He was a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institute on Aging (National Institutes of Health [NIH]). He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and has been a past chair of National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and Board on the Health of Select Populations and he has had substantial experience with National Academies studies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

and panels. He is currently involved in several actively funded research projects by NIH, including several related to nutritional issues.

John Wiley Williams, M.D., M.H.S., is a professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center and a past recipient of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Services Career Development Award and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Faculty Scholar Award. He received his bachelor and M.D. degrees from the University of North Carolina. Dr. Williams completed residency training at the University of Iowa and a research fellowship at Duke University. He is a primary care internist who is trained in epidemiology, biostatistics, and literature synthesis. Dr. Williams’s topical interests include depression, mental health services, dementia, and the implementation of best practices. He is scientific editor for the NC Medical Journal and a medical editor for the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making. Dr. Williams directs the Durham VA Evidence Synthesis Program and has led numerous systematic reviews, many focusing on mental health services. Dr. Williams is board certified in internal medicine and active in clinical practice and resident physician education at the Durham VA Medical Center.

STUDY STAFF, FELLOW, AND ADVISOR

Jennifer A. Cohen, M.P.H., is a program officer in the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She received her undergraduate degree and her M.P.H. from the University of Maryland. Ms. Cohen has been involved with the National Academies committees that produced Organ Procurement and Transplantation; Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures; Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000; Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2004; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2008; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2010; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2012; Post-Vietnam Dioxin Exposure in Agent Orange-Contaminated C-123 Aircraft; and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2014. She was also rapporteur for Challenges and Successes in Reducing Health Disparities.

Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, M.D., M.S., M.P.H. (Norman F. Grant/ American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fellow) is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, she received

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

her undergraduate degree in Community Health and African American Studies at Brown University. She went on to receive her medical degree from Brown Medical School, and, concurrently, completed a master’s in public health at the Harvard School of Public Health with a concentration in quantitative methods. Dr. Tucker Edmonds trained in obstetrics and gynecology at Duke University Medical Center, where she served as an administrative chief resident in her final year. She then entered the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, where she received health services research training and a master’s in health policy research. Most recently, she completed a clinical ethics fellowship through the Indiana University Health Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. Her work currently focuses on communication and decision making in the management of periviable deliveries—when end-of-life decisions are made at the very beginning of life.

Kelsey Geiser, M.A., is a research associate with the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Previously, she worked in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families on two consensus studies: Parenting Matters: Supporting Parents of Children Ages 0–8 and Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice. Prior to her work at the National Academies, Ms. Geiser wrote for the Stanford News Service and worked in the Palo Alto district office of Congresswoman Anna Eshoo. She has a B.A. and an M.A. in history from Stanford University with a focus on the historical treatment of women’s and family health issues.

Hope R. Hare, M.F.A., is the administrative assistant for the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She keeps the board information updated, administers the twice-yearly board meeting, and provides support for the board director and staff. Ms. Hare has worked for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine since 2001. She holds an M.F.A. from Cornell University.

Leigh Miles Jackson, Ph.D. (Study Director), is a senior program officer in the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Previously, she worked in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She has served as the study director for the Committee on the Use of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families and as the program officer for the Roundtable on the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

Communication and Use of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was a developmental psychopathology and neurogenomics research fellow at Vanderbilt University, where she investigated the role of chronic sleep disturbance and specific epigenetic modifications on the health outcomes of adolescents. She has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in molecular and systems pharmacology from Emory University.

Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D. (Senior Board Director), has been the director of the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice since 1999. Prior to joining the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Dr. Martinez was a senior health researcher at Mathematica Policy Research (1995–1999), where she conducted research on the impact of health system change on the public health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health care workforce. She is a former assistant director for health financing and policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office and served for 6 years directing research studies for the Regional Health Ministry of Madrid, Spain.

Matthew Masiello, is a research assistant for the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. He recently graduated from American University with a B.A. in international studies and a minor in public health. Prior to the working at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, he worked within several health-focused organizations, including the American Cancer Society and the Windber Research Institute.

Marjorie Pichon, is a senior program assistant for the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. While at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine she has contributed to projects such as a National Strategy for the Elimination of Hepatitis B and C, Public Health Approaches to Reduce Vision Impairment and Promote Eye Health, and a workshop on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Pinchon served as a Community Health Corps volunteer for Med-Star PromptCare, assisting underserved members of the community gain access to medical care. She graduated from Lewis & Clark College in May 2014 with a B.A. in psychology and a minor in rhetoric and media studies. During this time she collaborated on research in the college’s Human Computer Interaction Lab studying how the structure of play influences creativity in children.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×

Kathleen Stratton, Ph.D. (Advisor), began her career at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in 1990 in what was known at the time as the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She has spent most of her time with the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She has staffed committees addressing vaccine safety and development, pandemic preparedness, environmental and occupational health, drug safety, Medicare payment programs, and tobacco control. She was given the IOM Cecil Research Award in 2002 for sustained contributions to vaccine safety and was made a staff scholar in 2005. After 2 years at The Pew Charitable Trusts working on U.S. Food and Drug Administration reform, she returned to the National Academies in Fall 2013. She received a B.A. in natural sciences from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. She conducted postdoctoral research in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Sara Tharakan, was a research associate for the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. While at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, she worked on a number of projects, including Comprehensive Cancer Care for Children and Their Families: Summary of a Joint Workshop; Policy Issues in the Development and Adoption of Biomarkers for Molecularly Targeted Cancer Therapies: Workshop Summary; and Speech and Language Disorders in Children: Implications for the Social Security Administration’s Supplemental Security Income Program. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as an assistant researcher for the EKAM Foundation. Ms. Tharakan has a B.A. in political science and government from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is pursuing an M.Sc. at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

R. Brian Woodbury, is a research associate for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Health and Medicine Division. Here he has contributed to projects on nurse credentialing research, health standards for long-duration and exploration spaceflight, public health approaches to reduce vision impairment and promote eye health, and treatment of cardiac arrest. Prior to his work at the National Academies, Mr. Woodbury served in the U.S. Army as a combat medic and licensed practical nurse, and he later co-founded and managed a public health–oriented developmental aid project in Nepal. Mr. Woodbury’s academic background is in philosophy, classics, and the history and philosophy of mathematics and science at St. John’s College, as well as premedical studies at Johns Hopkins University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
Page 465
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
Page 466
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
Page 467
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches for Committee Members, Staff, Fellow, and Advisor." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24625.
×
Page 468
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Significant changes have taken place in the policy landscape surrounding cannabis legalization, production, and use. During the past 20 years, 25 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis and/or cannabidiol (a component of cannabis) for medical conditions or retail sales at the state level and 4 states have legalized both the medical and recreational use of cannabis. These landmark changes in policy have impacted cannabis use patterns and perceived levels of risk.

However, despite this changing landscape, evidence regarding the short- and long-term health effects of cannabis use remains elusive. While a myriad of studies have examined cannabis use in all its various forms, often these research conclusions are not appropriately synthesized, translated for, or communicated to policy makers, health care providers, state health officials, or other stakeholders who have been charged with influencing and enacting policies, procedures, and laws related to cannabis use. Unlike other controlled substances such as alcohol or tobacco, no accepted standards for safe use or appropriate dose are available to help guide individuals as they make choices regarding the issues of if, when, where, and how to use cannabis safely and, in regard to therapeutic uses, effectively.

Shifting public sentiment, conflicting and impeded scientific research, and legislative battles have fueled the debate about what, if any, harms or benefits can be attributed to the use of cannabis or its derivatives, and this lack of aggregated knowledge has broad public health implications. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids provides a comprehensive review of scientific evidence related to the health effects and potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis. This report provides a research agenda—outlining gaps in current knowledge and opportunities for providing additional insight into these issues—that summarizes and prioritizes pressing research needs.

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