National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix B - Projects with Different Service Lives (EANB and CMPD)
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Residual Values." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Analyses of Multimodal, Multijurisdictional Freight Corridor Investments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24680.
×
Page 131
Page 132
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Residual Values." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Analyses of Multimodal, Multijurisdictional Freight Corridor Investments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24680.
×
Page 132

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

131 A p p e n d i x C Table C1 provides commonly used service lives used in residual value calculations as discussed in one source. Residual Values Sources: Jones et al. (1), review of RailPAG (2), European Commission (3 ). Project Type Project Lifetime Airport extension 38 years Freight rail 35 years High speed rail 30–40 years High speed rail link 30 years Rail do-minimum line upgrade 40 years Rail grade crossing elimination 20 years Rail line renewal 38 years Rail line upgrade 40 years Rail line link 30 years Rail link to terminal 65 years Rail terminal development 50 years Freight transfer center 25 years Waterway and channel deepening 25 years or infinite Other port projects 30 years Typical Service Lives Used in Transportation Projects as reported by European Commission Port and airport 25 years Highways 25 years Rail 30 years Water and environment 29 years Table C1. Service lives for infrastructure. Component Project Lifetime Land 150 years Earthworks, protection, blanketing, bridges, station and buildings, and tunnels 50-60 years Tunnels, bridges 43 years Maintenance facilities 50 years Source: Adapted from Jones et al. (1) and RailPAG (2). Table C2. Service lives for infrastructure components.

132 Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Analyses of Multimodal, Multijurisdictional Freight Corridor investments References 1. Jones, H., T. Domingos, F. Moura, and J. Sussman. Transport Infrastructure Evaluation Using Cost-Benefit Analysis: Improvements to Valuing the Asset through Residual Value-A Case Study. ESD Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology Working Paper. 2013. 2. Railway Project Appraisal Guidelines. European Commission and European Investment Bank. 2003. Accessed 2015. http://www.eib.org/attachments/pj/railpag_en.pdf 3. European Commission. Guide to Cost-Benefit Analysis of Investment Projects-Structural Funds, Cohesion Fund and Instrument for Pre-Accession. Brussels: European Commission. 2003.

Next: Appendix D - Logsum Evaluation, Diversion Parameters, and Examples »
Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Analyses of Multimodal, Multijurisdictional Freight Corridor Investments Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's National Cooperative Freight Research Program (NCFRP) Research Report 38: Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Analyses of Multimodal, Multijurisdictional Freight Corridor Investments explores how to conduct benefit-cost analyses (BCAs). A BCA is an analytical framework used to evaluate public investment decisions including transportation investments. BCA is defined as a collection of methods and rules for assessing the social costs and benefits of alternative public policies. It promotes efficiency by identifying the set of feasible projects that would yield the largest positive net benefits to society.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!